Results 161–180 of 1533 for speaker:Sir George Benson

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals (12 Mar 1952)

Sir George Benson: It falls to me to undertake the very pleasant duty of congratulating the hon. Member for Blackley (Mr. E. Johnson) upon a very excellent maiden speech. I have spoken on more Budgets than I like to remember, but even now I envy the ease and confidence with which he addressed the Committee. I feel sure that we shall hear him again, and I hope frequently. I now turn to a more aggressive topic....

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals (12 Mar 1952)

Sir George Benson: I am dealing with the actual cost of the social services during those four years.

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals (12 Mar 1952)

Sir George Benson: The hon. and gallant Gentleman has merely raised a red herring. He has not attempted to answer my argument. The real reason the Tory Party, if they wanted drastically to reduce expenditure on civil account, have had to cut food subsidies and to run down the reserves and, in the Chancellor's own words, to postpone many useful services, is that there was no waste to be cut out and that, despite...

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals (12 Mar 1952)

Sir George Benson: The point which the Chancellor was making was that it would be rather ridiculous to raise the cost of living on the one hand and reduce taxation on the other, and he chose those two particular taxes—Income Tax and petrol duty—but he had completely forgotten what he himself said in 1950. Indeed, if the hon. and gallant Gentleman opposite does not like that, I would remind him that my right...

Orders of the Day — Licensed Premises in New Towns Bill (27 Feb 1952)

Sir George Benson: Has anybody applied?

Orders of the Day — Rivers (Prevention of Pollution) Bill: Clause 2. — (Prohibition on Use of Stream for Disposal of Polluting Matter, Refuse, etc.) (31 May 1951)

Sir George Benson: If the Amendment were accepted, in the opinion of the hon. and gallant Member, would it apply to "the usual channels"?

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: Before I congratulate the Chancellor, I would like to deal with the point regarding the Select Committee on National Expenditure. It did extremely valuable work during the war and it was for that reason that the Estimates Committee has since taken over its work. The Estimates Committee is doing exactly the same work—

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: It goes right to the spot in investigating the actual activities of Government Departments. Its function is much the same as that of the old Committee on National Expenditure and is quite different from that of the Public Accounts Committee. In addition to congratulating the Chancellor on his brilliant speech, I should also like to congratulate him on the extreme ingenuity of his Budget....

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: The fact that we have been able to meet this enormous increase in expenditure with a Budget which I would hardly describe as harsh or savage, is a tribute not merely to the Chancellor but to the extraordinary resilience and vitality of this country, and also to the part that six years of Labour policy has played in that. The right hon. and learned Member for Montgomery mentioned that our...

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: The right hon. Member is quite wrong. The number of non-industrial civil servants is something like between 420,000 and 440,000. [An HON. MEMBER: "What about the Post Office?"] In the 600,000 or 700,000 there are the Post Office—I think I am correct; I looked at the figures yesterday. A saving of £50 million, therefore, would involve, quite definitely, a cut of 25 per cent.

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: We have dispensed with 20,000 civil servants in the last 12 months, There would be subsidiary savings by dispensing with their services, but the broad fact remains that we have to make a cut of something like the kind I have mentioned before we could get the savings suggested by the right hon. Member for Aldershot. I was not quite sure what the right hon. Member for Ormskirk (Sir A. Salter)...

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: The major trouble with regard to a shortage of raw materials is, of course, the Korean war. The right hon. Member for Aldershot himself said that prior to that war, exporters were getting worried about whether they would be able to maintain their markets; there was the possibility of a recession. The time when there is a possibility of a recession is not the time to buy raw materials. The...

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: It certainly would have been a good thing, but whether it was physically possible is a matter which I cannot answer. That question must be asked of the appropriate Government Departments. A major argument used by the right hon. Member for Aldershot was the disastrous effect of the high level of taxation. He said, I think, that taxes are so high that there is nothing left for emergency. A...

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: The bulk of the taxation is returned to the community and redistributed. Taxation is the method by which we have given the community social security. The burdens we are putting on them in this Budget and in future Budgets are burdens which, we hope, will bring them, not merely social security, but international security.

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: I quite agree, and that makes the way in which we have built it up all the more extraordinary.

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: The hon. Gentleman is wrong. It is at least three-fifths that is returned to the taxpayers, and with regard to the loss on groundnuts, it was, it is true, £30 million, but that was spread over five years.

Orders of the Day — Budget Proposals and Economic Survey (11 Apr 1951)

Sir George Benson: Transfer payments.

Orders of the Day — Festival of Britain (Sunday Opening) Bill (23 Nov 1950)

Sir George Benson: Does the hon. Gentleman suggest that nobody is employed in his golf club on Sundays as a result of his being on the course?

Orders of the Day — Public Works Loans Bill (21 Nov 1950)

Sir George Benson: I do not think there is any great principle involved in the question of the rate at which local authorities can borrow. The right hon. Member for Leeds, North (Mr. Peake) will remember, if he casts his mind back, that we have completely altered the whole basis on which the local loans fund is fortified, and also the methods by which local authorities can borrow. Prior to the war the local...

Orders of the Day — Public Works Loans Bill (21 Nov 1950)

Sir George Benson: Certain smaller local authorities are borrowing much more cheaply under the present arrangement. If there is borrowing for a housing estate, it means borrowing for the amortisation period. Great local authorities like Manchester, with many millions of pounds of debt, could borrow on short-term for very favourable rates of interest, and the effect of compelling Manchester to borrow from the...


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