Results 141–160 of 1533 for speaker:Sir George Benson

Orders of the Day — Prevention of Crime Bill (26 Feb 1953)

Sir George Benson: I feel as the hon. and learned Gentleman feels. I do not think anybody likes the imposition of the duty of proving that he is innocent, but is not the hon. and learned Gentleman rather exaggerating when he says that there have not been encroachments in the past? What about loitering with intent, which is a very common charge?

Orders of the Day — Prevention of Crime Bill (26 Feb 1953)

Sir George Benson: What about the intention?

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice (Amendment) Bill (13 Feb 1953)

Sir George Benson: ; In 1863 a Private Member's Bill re-introduced corporal punishment into our penal code. It was passed against the wishes of the then Home Secretary, who denounced it as panic legislation. Exactly 90 years later some hon. Members are attempting once again to re-introduce corporal punishment into our penal system—and they also are doing it in a sense of panic. Throughout the country at the...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice (Amendment) Bill (13 Feb 1953)

Sir George Benson: I will deal with that. The fact that the judges passed only that tiny number of sentences for these two crimes of violence shows how exaggerated a picture the Press has been drawing for the past two years. Nobody denies that there are a number of very vicious and disgusting crimes committed in this country every year. The question before us is this: is corporal punishment the way to deal with...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice (Amendment) Bill (13 Feb 1953)

Sir George Benson: The right hon. and gallant Member may shake his head, but he cannot get away from the fact that robbery with violence increased from 1939 to 1948 when it was floggable and when the judges were flogging more frequently than they had ever flogged in any previous period of this century. It increased by four times. As soon as flogging was abolished, the amount of robbery started to fall.

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice (Amendment) Bill (13 Feb 1953)

Sir George Benson: It may be nothing to the right hon. and gallant Gentleman, but it is a confirmation of the findings of the Departmental Committee that the use of corporal punishment has no bearing on the crime rate. Captain Waterhouse: There were more cases of robbery with violence in 1948, when the punishment was abolished, than ever before. As has been said, in subsequent years the courts no longer made...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice (Amendment) Bill (13 Feb 1953)

Sir George Benson: The hon. Gentleman is completely muddled. The figures which have been provided are those of crimes known to the police. Those are the figures which the Home Secretary quoted. The courts do not compile the list of crimes known to the police; that is done by the police forces. Those crimes are compiled and entered into the register long before the case comes to court. The police authorities...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice (Amendment) Bill (13 Feb 1953)

Sir George Benson: I am afraid I cannot explain to the right hon. and gallant Gentleman the difference between crimes known to the police and persons charged, but will he take it from me that there is a difference and that every other hon. Member understands it? In view of our 90 years' experience, it is quite fantastic to suggest that corporal punishment is the answer to violent crime. What interests me about...

PRISON BILL [Lords] (15 Jul 1952)

Sir George Benson: On a point of order. I submit, Mr. Speaker, that the Bill is not a Consolidation Bill. I do so on the ground that it makes a major change in the law of this country. I know that there are a number of slight Amendments—"corrections and improvements" is the phrase, I think—embodied in the Bill, but when a Bill contains a very serious alteration in the law of the land I do not think it can...

PRISON BILL [Lords] (15 Jul 1952)

Sir George Benson: Without in any way reflecting upon you, Mr. Speaker, I suggest that the Lord Chancellor has made a very bad mistake in certifying the Bill as a Consolidation Measure and that the Bill is not a Consolidation Bill because it makes a major change in the law. If the Lord Chancellor has made a mistake this House has no right to be robbed of its powers to debate a Bill which makes a radical change...

PRISON BILL [Lords] (15 Jul 1952)

Sir George Benson: The statute to which I have referred was repealed after 1877, and prior to the introduction of the Bill.

Civil List ( 9 Jul 1952)

Sir George Benson: Mr. George Benson (Chesterfield) rose—

Civil List ( 9 Jul 1952)

Sir George Benson: Perhaps I might thank the Lord Privy Seal on behalf of the hon. Member for Twickenham (Sir E. Keeling). Speaking for one Member of the Select Committee, I am very pleased indeed that the Government have agreed to do something which the Select Committee itself might have done had it thought about it. This debate must be the quietest debate on a Civil List which has ever taken place. Even my...

Civil List ( 9 Jul 1952)

Sir George Benson: The right hon. Gentleman is quite wrong. I have been pointing out that the revenue of the Crown Lands was the revenue for the purpose of running the country as a whole, and what has happened is this, that the Crown has surrendered approximately £1 million a year and the country bears £4,000 million for the Crown. I think the Crown has got a good bargain.

Civil List ( 9 Jul 1952)

Sir George Benson: As I pointed out a moment ago, in the reign of William IV, which was in the 19th Century, revenue from the Crown Lands was used to pay the salary of Mr. Speaker and the salaries of other officials as well as certain expenses. But even in the 13th Century it will be found that the revenue from the Crown Lands was inadequate, except in most favourable circumstances, to enable the Crown to pay...

Civil List ( 9 Jul 1952)

Sir George Benson: May I give the answer to that by putting another question? Why is it that the House asks permission from the Sovereign to spend or raise money?

Civil List ( 9 Jul 1952)

Sir George Benson: Certainly it has. Let me put it another way.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: New Clause. — (Power to Require Production of Books and Accounts.) (28 May 1952)

Sir George Benson: We on this side of the Committee welcome the speech of the hon. Member for Canterbury (Mr. Baker White) because we are asking for certain additional powers for inspectors of taxes, including the power to inspect the books. The hon. Member has told us that in the markets there are two bodies who have power to inspect the books of the traders, the Ministry of Food and apparently the National...

Orders of the Day — EALING CORPORATION BILL (By Order) (26 Mar 1952)

Sir George Benson: The detailed exchanges between my hon. Friend the Member for Southall (Mr. Pargiter) and the hon. Member for Ealing, South (Mr. Maude) show quite clearly that this House is not the place where a final decision should be taken on a complex problem like this. If this Bill is given a Second Reading, it will go upstairs to a Committee and the Committee will be able to deal in far more detail than...

Orders of the Day — EALING CORPORATION BILL (By Order) (26 Mar 1952)

Sir George Benson: I am arguing the general case why the House should pass these Bills of non-county boroughs so that they may go to the Committee. I am not arguing the case of Ealing; I am arguing the general case, which involves Ealing. If we are to have a large scheme of local government reform, or even if Middlesex as a unit were to be considered, the case for this Bill might be weakened; but at present...


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