Results 121–140 of 1533 for speaker:Sir George Benson

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: Exactly. That is what I was going to point out. One of the things I did at the prison was to examine the walls of the cells. Even the walls of the unoccupied cells in winter were dry. There is condensation there during the summer; that is true. It is unpleasant, but I think that I am correct in saying that Dartmoor is one of the healthiest prisons in England, despite that. I know that the...

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: I am not sure that the prison is not drier than some of the prison officers' houses. In winter Dartmoor prison is dry; the trouble is condensation in the summer.

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: If my hon. Friend were serving a 10 years' sentence, would he prefer to be in Dartmoor, with the opportunity of getting on to the moor in some semblance of freedom, or would he rather be in Manchester Prison, behind Manchester Prison walls?

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: My hon. Friend has not answered my question.

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: I did not mention the reformative effect of Dartmoor, but has my right hon. Friend any idea of the result of imprisonment in Dartmoor and Parkhurst? Has he any figures to show what happens to the habitual criminal? I have.

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: Nonsense.

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: My right hon. Friend has challenged me. He said, "Ask the people who have been in Dartmoor." While I was in Dartmoor I had a discussion with a group of prisoners, and the question arose whether Wandsworth or Dartmoor was the better prison. The group split 50–50.

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: Three days in the prison

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: The rest of the time in hospital.

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: Are there long-term contracts yet?

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: Of the seven acres about one acre has already been enclosed with an unclimbable fence. I am extremely disappointed that the work cannot be done by prisoners, and I am not prepared to accept that it cannot be done with adequate security.

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: The Under-Secretary used one phrase to which I should like to refer. He said that psychiatric treatment was available for those who will require it and who will co-operate. That will give another opportunity to the judges to say, "We are going to send you down for five years in order that you will get treatment." The hon. Gentleman knows that psychiatric treatment in prisons is in a very...

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: It is not.

Orders of the Day — Prisons ( 2 Mar 1953)

Sir George Benson: My hon. Friend is making charges of ill-discipline in the prisons. Is he aware that the rate of punishment, which is the best guide, was one per 1,000 of the prison population per day from 1931 to 1935 and was exactly the same in 1951, so that there has been no decrease in discipline despite the enormous overcrowding?

Orders of the Day — Prisons ( 2 Mar 1953)

Sir George Benson: I have a great deal of sympathy with practically everything said by the hon. Member for Wavertree (Mr. Tilney). I am pleased that he raised the question of after-care because our after-care system at present is entirely obsolete and is based on the local prison in its operation. Fortunately, there is a committee sitting consisting of the Discharged Prisoners' Aid Society, the After-care...

Orders of the Day — Prisons ( 2 Mar 1953)

Sir George Benson: I am well aware of that, and particularly in Wandsworth, which is one of the most difficult prisons in the country. But the proof of the pudding is in the eating: that is, that the numbers of offences reported to the governors are no higher than in 1930, 1935 and 1936. That is evidence that discipline is being maintained. There are two specific problems with which I want to deal: one is...

Orders of the Day — Prisons ( 2 Mar 1953)

Sir George Benson: —but possibly he has seen the unclimbable wire fence which has been put round part of the croft. That makes a very formidable barrier to escape. If the right hon. and learned Gentleman requires a greater security camp, that unclimbable wire fence is ideal for the purpose. If he wants double security, all that he has to do is to put in two concentric rings and electrical alarms, and he has...

Orders of the Day — Prisons ( 2 Mar 1953)

Sir George Benson: Preston and Northallerton, both maximum security prisons.

Orders of the Day — Prevention of Crime Bill (26 Feb 1953)

Sir George Benson: In the debate on corporal punishment, the point that was made was that the crime which was a floggable offence—that is, robbery with violence—had decreased since 1948. There was no suggestion whatever that all crimes of violence had decreased. It was merely that the crime that had been floggable had decreased from the time that corporal punishment was abolished.

Orders of the Day — Prevention of Crime Bill (26 Feb 1953)

Sir George Benson: In 1951, there were 800 crimes of robbery, over 1,000 crimes of felonious violence and over 4,000 crimes of malicious violence. Crimes for neither felonious nor malicious violence were floggable. The hon. Gentleman must not confuse general crimes of violence with the particular crime of violence—robbery—which was floggable.


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