Results 101–120 of 1533 for speaker:Sir George Benson

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill (12 Mar 1956)

Sir George Benson: Before I address myself to the problem before the House, I wish to refer to an incident which was mentioned by the hon. Member for Westbury (Sir R. Grimston), who moved the Amendment. That was a quotation from a publication of the Howard League. I have been chairman of the Howard League for nearly 20 years, and I assure the hon. Member, if that is necessary, that the Howard League was not...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill (12 Mar 1956)

Sir George Benson: I now want to pick another quarrel with the hon. Member. He said that he supported capital punishment because he wished to have the maximum protection for the community and capital punishment was a unique deterrent. I want to examine that question of deterrents and to consider capital punishment merely as one form of a severely deterrent punishment. I want to examine the general question of...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill (12 Mar 1956)

Sir George Benson: One cannot go back to 1812 and the position in a foreign country.

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill (12 Mar 1956)

Sir George Benson: I am making a general case that the effect of abolition in foreign countries has never led to an increase in murders.

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill (12 Mar 1956)

Sir George Benson: The Royal Commission point out that when the death penalty was abolished there was no increase in the number of murders. Again, just over a century ago more than 200 crimes against property carried the death penalty. After a bitter fight it was abolished for those crimes, and remained practically for murder alone. Everybody knows that after the abolition of capital punishment for these...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill (12 Mar 1956)

Sir George Benson: Then all I can say is, heaven help the hon. Member. Those legends provide a marvellous example of the power of the myth. Hon. Members, apparently, still believe that corporal punishment is an effective deterrent. The report of the Departmental Committee was roughly the same as that of the Royal Commission on Capital Punishment: it could find nothing in the history of the last century which...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill (12 Mar 1956)

Sir George Benson: I felt sure that I should get exactly that comment from the hon. Member for Ayr. This is a very difficult and complex subject, and if I have to offer any explanation of it, I do so very tentatively and would say that what appears to me to be the explanation is this. There are two types of offenders—the type of offender whom we cannot deter, no matter what we do, and the type of offender who...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: New Prisons (Building Programme) ( 9 Dec 1954)

Sir George Benson: I notice that the list of proposed new prisons and Borstals given by the Home Secretary did not include one institution which was foreshadowed in the last Report of the Prison Commissioners—a prison for aged and decrepit prisoners, now kept in maximum security cells. Has that been abandoned?

Clerk of the House (Retirement) (29 Jul 1954)

Sir George Benson: I think it fitting that a back bencher on this side of the House should also express his appreciation of the services rendered by Sir Frederic to back benchers. It is a long time since I first came into this House, and in those days Sir Frederic was Second Clerk Assistant. I can remember the advice which I received as a new Member, completely muddled and befuddled by our procedure and in...

Orders of the Day — House of Commons Accommodation (22 Jul 1954)

Sir George Benson: I should not have risen had not the Library been mentioned. My hon. Friend the Member for East Ham, North (Mr. Daines) hoped that my feelings would not be hurt by what he said, but nobody could have been a member of the Library Committee for the last eight years if he had had any feelings left to be hurt. I was pleased to hear my hon. Friend suggest that there should be a real and effective...

Orders of the Day — House of Commons Accommodation (22 Jul 1954)

Sir George Benson: It is suggested that the Library should give up its reference section. My answer is: Give us the rooms and the staff and we will produce you a decent, reasonable reference and research section. The right hon. Member for Epsom (Mr. McCorquodale) was entirely wrong in thinking that the research department, trivial though it may be, has not been thought out. All questions such as what we shall...

Orders of the Day — House of Commons Accommodation (22 Jul 1954)

Sir George Benson: At the present moment the Library Committee has to wrestle alone with those problems. The key to everything in this Palace is more floor space. Suggestions about pushing people around cause almost as much trouble as they alleviate, because we cannot get a quart into a pint pot. The suggestion that we should build over Star Chamber Court and provide a writing room is only playing with the...

Orders of the Day — House of Commons Accommodation (22 Jul 1954)

Sir George Benson: I am not responsible for that. There is no reason why we should not have two floors between the Chamber and the Tea Room. If we are going to increase our accommodation, let us do it on a proper scale and not have to take about half a dozen bites at the cherry at intervals of years. It is very easy to talk about what we ought to do, but it has been a very hard fight to get what we have got....

Orders of the Day — House of Commons Accommodation (22 Jul 1954)

Sir George Benson: The reference room.

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: I am very pleased that the House is being given this opportunity of discussing our prison system because, apart from the two or three hours' debate which we had on the subject last March, this is the first time for 20 years that we have discussed the matter. It strikes me as being most logical to start at the beginning, and, therefore, I propose, first, to look at the people sent into our...

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: I suggest that my hon. Friend reads that paragraph rather more carefully than he has done.

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: I do not know the page. The Report contains many paragraphs, but I know the one to which my hon. Friend is referring. The Prison Commissioners have been allowed to introduce the three-shift system into Dartmoor and similar prisons, but they are not allowed to recruit adequate staffs for local prisons. The whole attitude of the Treasury towards Civil Service and Government staffs is quite...

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: I am quite ready to give way, if the Minister wishes to intervene. I want now to turn to Dartmoor. What has happened to C Hall? It was pulled down some time ago for the purpose of making workshops and classrooms. Has it been rebuilt for that purpose and has prison labour been used on it? I think it ought to have been. Having mentioned Dartmoor, there are one or two things I want to say...

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: It depends on what time of the year one goes to Dartmoor. I went there in January. I chose that time because I wanted to see what Dartmoor weather was like. In the three days I was there we had snow, hail, rain, a blizzard and sunshine. The weather is indescribably foul. I forget the number of days in which the men cannot go out of the prison, but I think that it is something like 120 to 150...

Prisons (Overcrowding) ( 5 Feb 1954)

Sir George Benson: Has my right hon. Friend been there?


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