Results 81–100 of 1533 for speaker:Sir George Benson

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) ( 4 Dec 1956)

Sir George Benson: In that case, the hon. Member is at odds with his own Government.

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) ( 4 Dec 1956)

Sir George Benson: It shows that the Government, in trying to retain some semblance of the death penalty, are landing their own supporters in very great difficulty. The hon. Gentleman quoted as evidence that rape was the worst crime—and I am not for a moment challenging the fact that it is—that it was one of the few offences that carried the heavy sentence of life imprisonment. One cannot attempt to judge...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) ( 4 Dec 1956)

Sir George Benson: That was an example of the illogicality of the law, and I used it to warn hon. Members opposite not to take the maximum penalty as the true guide to the seriousness of the offence. If we are to have capital murder and non-capital murder there is possibly one guide that we can accept—it is, I think, a logical guide—namely: what is likely to be the subsequent conduct of a person who...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) ( 4 Dec 1956)

Sir George Benson: No, I am only applying this particular test to the Amendment of the hon. Member for Chichester. He has unfortunately chosen a very bad example of that test. The curious thing is—he may not know it—that sexual crimes and crimes of violence are particularly the crimes in relation to which subsequent conduct is better than it is after crimes against property. That is an extraordinary thing,...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) ( 4 Dec 1956)

Sir George Benson: I am not discussing—it would not be in order for me to do so—the penalties for rape, except in so far as the hon. Member's Amendment concerns murder. I am trying to point out that for his particular choice of capital murder he has no evidence—it is merely that he revolts, as we all do, against the crime of rape—and if he is attempting to build a logical case for including rape and...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) ( 4 Dec 1956)

Sir George Benson: Why should the hon. Gentleman say that? Practically the whole of our society runs on the fact that we rely on the average conduct of the average individual.

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) ( 4 Dec 1956)

Sir George Benson: Of course it is a deterrent. Nobody denies that.

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 3. — (Provocation.) (28 Nov 1956)

Sir George Benson: I quite agree with the Attorney-General that this is a very difficult problem. I doubt very much whether the two sides of the Committee will ever see eye to eye upon it, because they are fundamentally divided on the basic problem, that is, of the death penalty. In effect, the Attorney-General's case is that the only possible criterion is whether a perfectly normal man would be so irritated...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill (15 Nov 1956)

Sir George Benson: The House is in process of re-enacting with extraordinary fidelity a series of events which took place in 1948. In that year the House carried an Amendment to the Criminal Justice Bill, against the Government, in favour of the abolition of capital punishment. When the Measure went to another place, the Amendment was deleted. When the Bill returned to us, we attempted to meet the objections...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill (15 Nov 1956)

Sir George Benson: The fact that the right hon. and learned Gentleman regards the other place as vitally important is surely an argument for sending the Silverman Bill to it and not risking a clash between this House and the other place.

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill (15 Nov 1956)

Sir George Benson: And vice versa.

Home Office ( 2 Jul 1956)

Sir George Benson: Without wishing to be controversial, I must say that I was struck by the different angle from which the Home Secretary approached the problem of the purposes of prison from that which he adopted in his speech on Thursday on the death penalty. Not one word was said this afternoon about deterrence. Indeed, I doubt very much whether anybody who knows much about our penal system will discuss...

Home Office ( 2 Jul 1956)

Sir George Benson: I said 40 years.

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of Death Penalty. (16 May 1956)

Sir George Benson: I think that perhaps this Amendment is one of the least easy to give a reply to—not the most difficult, but the least easy. The reply to previous Amendments is quite overwhelming, although hon. Members do not accept this. In no case where capital punishment has been abolished has there been any increase in murder in general, and on the last case we were considering in so far as it dealt...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of Death Penalty. (16 May 1956)

Sir George Benson: I do not know; it may be. In dealing with the murder of another prisoner or a prison officer the real argument is the fact that murders have never taken place in prison, as the hon. Baronet the Member for Hendon, South (Sir H. Lucas-Tooth) said. I will give what seems to me the reason, but, before I deal with that point, I should like to refer to the suggestion that if a man is serving a life...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of Death Penalty. (16 May 1956)

Sir George Benson: I have said that I wanted to talk about prison discipline in general, because I wanted to make the point, which I made on Second Reading, that the deterrent effect is not dependent upon the severity of the punishment. I have pointed out that where countries have had experience of flogging, like Scotland, they had abolished it, because they found that they could deal with the discipline...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of Death Penalty. (16 May 1956)

Sir George Benson: The ordinary run of prison offences—the ordinary trivial, disciplinary offences, such as insulting language to an officer or disobeying an order. But nobody pretends that the discipline in Scottish prisons is any worse than the discipline in English prisons. There is one even more striking comparison. I will mention no names, but I know of a large English prison which had an extremely good...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of Death Penalty. (16 May 1956)

Sir George Benson: Practically every other country in Europe has met this problem successfully without retaining the death penalty for the murder of prison officers. I quoted the Swedish prison officers who did not want the death penalty retained at any price because they thought it would do more harm than good.

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill: Clause 1. — (Abolition of Death Penalty. (16 May 1956)

Sir George Benson: Clearly, every prisoner sentenced to life imprisonment assumes and hopes that he will be released some day. One does not pass two types of life sentence, telling one prisoner he will come out in ten years and another he is in for life. A life sentence is passed; it is then up to the prisoner to make good in goal. As has been said before during this debate, that is what definitely does...

Orders of the Day — Death Penalty (Abolition) Bill (12 Mar 1956)

Sir George Benson: rose—


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