Results 61–80 of 1533 for speaker:Sir George Benson

Orders of the Day — Exchequer and Audit Departments Bill ( 9 Jul 1957)

Sir George Benson: He does not. They are voluntary. I would not mind if he did, for I have never felt that it was economy to try to buy brains cheaply. I was glad to see that civil servants have received an increase in remuneration and I am glad that the Comptroller and Auditor General is now to share it.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 38. — (Reduction of National Land Fund.) ( 1 Jul 1957)

Sir George Benson: I listened to the long and eloquent speech of my hon. Friend the Member for Newcastle - upon - Tyne, East (Mr. Blenkinsop), but I found it extraordinarily difficult to relate anything he said to the Clause. One thing for which the National Land Fund cannot be used is the establishment and development of national parks. My hon. Friend talked about nothing else. We are discussing a very narrow...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 38. — (Reduction of National Land Fund.) ( 1 Jul 1957)

Sir George Benson: My hon. Friend did not resign at that meeting and he did not exercise his right, which was exercised by a number of other members at that meeting, of voting against the Chairman's draft report. If I remember rightly, he had put down an Amendment, which was entirely out of order, because it was contrary to the law, and I ruled it out of order; but the hon. Member did not stay to oppose the...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 38. — (Reduction of National Land Fund.) ( 1 Jul 1957)

Sir George Benson: No, I did not oppose it. I merely say that it was bad finance. If I were to oppose bad finance every time it appears in Finance Bills, I should make one long continuous speech lasting years.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 38. — (Reduction of National Land Fund.) ( 1 Jul 1957)

Sir George Benson: I do not have the fluency of my hon. Friend. I wish I had. Again, one of the criticisms of this Fund could not emerge until some years after it had been in existence. The Fund amounts to £50 million and has accumulated interest of nearly £10 million and during the twelve years of its existence only about £750,000 has been spent from it. Had the Fund been necessary, had it served an...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 38. — (Reduction of National Land Fund.) ( 1 Jul 1957)

Sir George Benson: If this is a good policy for landed families, why not vote thousands of millions for the Army?

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 38. — (Reduction of National Land Fund.) ( 1 Jul 1957)

Sir George Benson: My right hon. Friend is perfectly correct. I live and learn.

Orders of the Day — Supply: Vote 4. Prisons, England and Wales (13 Mar 1957)

Sir George Benson: The remarks of the Home Secretary on the subject of research were most heartening. Probably they formed the most important things he said. One of the main troubles of the penal system has always been that everybody knows exactly how to treat criminals. The re- suit is that nobody has ever troubled to find out anything and probably we know next to nothing. I was surprised that the right hon....

Orders of the Day — Supply: Vote 4. Prisons, England and Wales (13 Mar 1957)

Sir George Benson: That is even better. I wish to call attention to the immense number of items which in the original Estimate were comprised in the section dealing with new buildings. Everthorpe is one prison, but there are forty or fifty prisons. Every one of them either needs most drastic alteration and modification or rebuilding. We have a programme for rebuilding which would take years to accomplish. It...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill ( 6 Feb 1957)

Sir George Benson: I am afraid that I cannot agree with the hon. Member for Gravesend (Mr. Kirk), who said that it would have been better to have proceeded by having a wise Home Secretary who would have reprieved everybody. To begin with, one has to have a wise Home Secretary and, after that, a continued series of wise Home Secretaries. I think that that is asking too much of this House on such a serious...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill ( 6 Feb 1957)

Sir George Benson: The question of the number of murders is not really relevant. What is relevant is the number of murderers. We get the case where a man wipes out his whole family. The number of murders is always very much greater than the number of murderers. That is the important point.

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) (24 Jan 1957)

Sir George Benson: The speech of the hon. Member for Surbiton (Mr. Fisher) repeats the statement which is made so frequently, that the death penalty is the only effective deterrent. That is not a matter of knowledge; it is an act of faith. That is what I complain about. Hon. Gentlemen never have adduced any evidence whatsoever that the death penalty is more effective than a long term of imprisonment in any...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) (24 Jan 1957)

Sir George Benson: I was, in fact, about to deal with that point. We have compared like with like, because the police are armed in States where the death penalty is retained and in States where it is not. That is a common factor when we are comparing its effect, and that is what we are considering. We are comparing the murder rate in respect of policemen in the States where there is no death penalty with the...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) (24 Jan 1957)

Sir George Benson: What happened was that certain high officials of the Ministry of Justice came to this country to address hon. Members. The Swedish Prison Officers' Association passed a resolution, unasked, hoping that the English prison officers would not ask for the protection of the death penalty, on the ground that the Swedish prison officers who have had this experience had come to the conclusion that...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) (24 Jan 1957)

Sir George Benson: Certainly, but not all of them.

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) (24 Jan 1957)

Sir George Benson: The most striking figure which the Joint Under-Secretary gave was the number of assaults on prison officers which took place in 1955, namely, 123. That is staggering evidence of the extraordinary good discipline in our prisons. There is a daily average population of 24,000, and a throughput of very nearly 40,000; yet, with that population, there were only 123 assaults, of which the vast...

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) (23 Jan 1957)

Sir George Benson: Why does the right hon. and learned Gentleman say that?

Orders of the Day — Middle East ( 6 Dec 1956)

Sir George Benson: Who would have destroyed the oil installations?

Orders of the Day — Homicide Bill: Clause 5. — (Death Penalty for Certain Murders.) ( 4 Dec 1956)

Sir George Benson: The speech of the hon. Member for Chichester (Sir L. Joynson-Hicks) brings out very clearly the difficulty in which the Bill has placed hon. Members. It is an attempt to separate from the various types of murder one specific type which shall carry the death penalty. The fact that it does so surely marks the abandonment of the idea that the death penalty is the supreme deterrent. It also lands...


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