Results 21–40 of 1533 for speaker:Sir George Benson

Business of the House (20 Jul 1961)

Sir George Benson: Is the Leader of the House aware of the Report of the Estimates Committee on the Library, and of the Library Committee's reply thereto? As both Committees are very desirous of a debate in the House, is it possible to arrange one at an early date?

House of Commons Library (Estimates Committee's Report) (18 May 1961)

Sir George Benson: Further to that point of order, Mr. Speaker. What worries me is the effect of the Report on members of the staff. They do not know where they are. They are thoroughly upset and, unless some assurance is given, in a very short time we shall lose half-a-dozen of our best people.

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Restriction of Sentence of Death.) (12 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: I hope that the right hon. Gentleman is not suggesting that I am satisfied even with the age of 21. I was merely pointing out that that was all that could be done under the Bill.

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Corporal Punishment in Detention Centres.) (12 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: I am sorry to hear the right hon. Gentleman say that he is treating the Clause with any degree of sympathy. Junior detention centres may be very similar to approved schools, but senior detention centres are practically identical, both in the type of individual who goes to them and in the result, with borstals and (prisons. If we are to allow the governor or a warden of a detention centre to...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: Clause 10. — (Minimum Age for Attendance Centre.) (12 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: I apologise for not having heard the hon. and learned Gentleman move the Amendment. I should like to ask one or two questions. Originally 12 hours was the maximum. Now it is to become the minimum, with 24 hours as the maximum. Has the hon. and learned Gentleman any facts to offer us about the results of these attendance centres? Has he, for example, the re-conviction rate? Has he any idea of...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: Clause 10. — (Minimum Age for Attendance Centre.) (12 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: I was talking about the attendance centres, not the juvenile liaison schemes. That is what I am interested in.

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Increase of Penalties for Assisting Escape from Prison, etc.) (11 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: I should like to ask the Joint Under-Secretary a question on subsection (1). In how many cases have escapes or attempted escapes been assisted from outside? Two years is a rather heavy sentence, and unless there has been a significant increase in the number of attempts from outside to enable prisoners to escape, I doubt very much whether there is any ground for increasing what is already a...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Corporal Punishment for Young Offenders, on Second and Subsequent Conviction.) (11 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: This is not the first time that we have discussed corporal punishment in this House. The real question we face is: is there any evidence that corporal punishment is a more effective form of deterrent than the other forms of deterrent at our disposal? It is a matter of fact. The facts have been investigated with very great care more than once. The first serious investigation was carried out...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Corporal Punishment for Young Offenders, on Second and Subsequent Conviction.) (11 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: I did not say that corporal punishment was not a deterrent. Any form of punishment is a deterrent. The case against corporal punishment is that there is not a solitary shred of evidence, either in the past or in the present, to show that it is any more effective than other forms of punishment. That is the case against it.

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Corporal Punishment for Young Offenders, on Second and Subsequent Conviction.) (11 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: Of course it is a deterrent. No one in his senses has ever denied that. But what has to be established if we are to reintroduce it is that it is a deterrent which we require in addition to the other deterrents, and that it is more effective than those deterrents which already exist. I say categorically that the investigations we have had on that specific point have both led to the...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Corporal Punishment for Young Offenders, on Second and Subsequent Conviction.) (11 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: Will the hon. Member relate those figures to corporal punishment? He has been quoting the figures for crimes of violence, but there was only one crime of violence which was previously floggable and that was robbery with violence. Other crimes of violence were not floggable. If he will analyse his figures, he will find that it is the crimes of violence which were not floggable which have...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Corporal Punishment for Young Offenders, on Second and Subsequent Conviction.) (11 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: I do not deny that birching and caning are deterrents. All forms of unpleasantness can be deterrents. The question is whether caning and birching are a more effective deterrent than other forms of deterrent and whether it is worth while reintroducing corporal punishment. My opinion is that it is not.

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Restriction of Sentence of Death.) (11 Apr 1961)

Sir George Benson: I am pleased that my name is not attached to this Clause. It is rather shameful. It asks that we should cease to hang adolescents. In Denmark there has been no execution for 67 years, in Norway for 85, in Belgium for 95 and in Holland for 101 years, and here are we in the Labour Party asking that the death penalty should not be imposed on adolescents. I suppose that my hon. Friends on the...

Orders of the Day — Guided Weapons (Reports from Committee of Public Accounts) (19 Dec 1960)

Sir George Benson: This is the first time in this century that the House has decided to debate a Report of the Committee of Public Accounts and, as an old member of the Committee, I am not sure whether to take that as a slight or a compliment. However, I am glad that we are debating these Reports because I think that the work of the Committee is vital to the economic and efficient running of our great Civil...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill (17 Nov 1960)

Sir George Benson: It is so long since I addressed the House that I almost feel inclined to ask the indulgence which is always shown to the first offender. I think that when considering our penal system the three custodial forms of treatment are regarded as having three entirely different purposes. A prison is associated with punishment; borstal with reform; and detention with deterrence, owing to that rather...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill (17 Nov 1960)

Sir George Benson: The figures are higher, although I do not know why. The failure rate for probation in England was 29·7 per cent. and for some curious reason in Scotland it was 37 per cent., but the Scottish figures were based on a very small sample. In the White Paper on Penal Practice we are told that in 1953–54, 87 per cent. of star prisoners were successful on a three-and-a-half year follow up. A star...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill (17 Nov 1960)

Sir George Benson: As a matter of fact, on that body we spent nearly six months taking massive evidence.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Corporal Punishment (Reference to Advisory Council) (28 Jan 1960)

Sir George Benson: In view of the original Report on corporal punishment and the subsequent White Paper issued by the Home Office, would not the right hon. Gentleman agree that the Home Office Advisory Council—and I had better declare my interest in that I am a member of it—would he able to produce a Report with a reasonable degree of celerity?


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.