Results 181–200 of 1533 for speaker:Sir George Benson

Orders of the Day — Public Works Loans Bill (21 Nov 1950)

Sir George Benson: The local authorities have no power to borrow in the open market now. That power has been taken from them. The rate of interest at which different local authorities could borrow varied enormously. Big authorities like Manchester could borrow at as low a rate as the Government. The smaller local authorities borrowed from the Board at 4, 5 or 6 per cent. because they could not borrow in the...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: I should like to congratulate the hon. Member for Louth (Mr. Osborne) on a fine piece of bluff. When he thought he was out of order he announced he would talk about something in the Bill, and then, very firmly, he referred to the taxation on undistributed profits. I do not think that undistributed profits appear in the Bill from one end of it to the other. However. the hon. Gentleman got away...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: Yes, of course it does, but 16-ounce cloth is fairly heavy cloth. I have worked out the cost of running 16 ounces of wool 200 miles in a five ton lorry, and as a result of the increased cost of petrol the increase on this price of wool would be one-thirtieth of a penny per yard. In any case, how many yards of wool cloth are running 200 miles by lorry before they get to the export market?

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: In the cloth I instanced there are only 16 ounces of wool in a yard.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: We have to take all these different hauls into account. I challenge the hon. Gentleman to prove that the average piece of cloth goes 200 miles by road, whether it is in the form of raw wool, undyed wool, or any other wool.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: But this 200 miles is not steadily and invariably done by road haulage. At Bradford goods are hauled by railway just as much as by road. I will double the mileage if the hon. Gentleman wishes, and suggest 400 miles for the haulage of a piece of cloth. It still only makes one-fifteenth of a penny per yard difference; it is really silly to exaggerate as hon. Members are doing. The cost of this...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: I am fully aware of the hon. Gentleman's view on the matter. What is the value of our industry—£5,000 million?

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: And £40 million is to be the straw that breaks the camel's back? I thank the hon. Gentleman for his figures. I want to leave that and turn to a remark made by the right hon. Gentleman the Member for Aldershot (Mr. Lyttelton) about the global effect of this and other Finance Bills. The right hon. Gentleman should be more careful. He speaks with the authority of a Front Bench Member,...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: It was frivolous—

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: I am fully aware of that, but what I have said is what we did during the last war.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: Nobody suggested we would, but I am trying to point out to the right hon. Gentleman that the level of taxation at these times does not in any way hamper the transfer of that 50 per cent. of the national resources from the private individual to the Government in war-time.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: Is it?

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: I am certainly going on. Take the last war. We had a fairly high rate of taxation.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: I am sorry I was misled, but I suggest that it is an economic fallacy to say that our level of taxation today in any way limits or hinders the material transference of goods and services from the private consumer to the Government in time of war. It does not. It is merely another red herring. The right hon. Gentleman also said that owing to our taxation the standard of living was falling, and...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: Earnings are not falling—

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: It may be perfectly true that basic wage rates are falling in relation to prices.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: What does the right hon. Gentleman mean by real wages? Does he mean the earnings of the manual worker?

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: What a given rate of wages will buy! In other words, what the right hon. Gentleman is saying is that prices have risen. We know that, but earnings have risen very rapidly. Perhaps the hon. and learned Member for Norwich, South (Mr. H. Strauss) did not know that. It is not a question for argument but one of fact. Earnings have risen more rapidly than prices within the last few years.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: One of the reasons for a reduced rate of saving is that the man in the street can buy more.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (10 Jul 1950)

Sir George Benson: I do not say that conditions are perfect, but they are better than they were two years ago, and that that is one of the reasons why savings have decreased. Another thing which the right hon. Gentleman said is that the fiscal policy of this Bill was cramping the re-equipment of industry. There is no limit at present to re-equipment, except the availability of the physical resources. The reason...


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