Results 141–160 of 596 for speaker:Mr Edward Lyons

Petition: Torture (22 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: Torture was virtually eliminated from European States at the end of the nineteenth century. Nowadays, however, it cannot be regarded simply as a remnant of a barbaric age. For the past 20 years the incidence of torture in many forms has been spreading over the world in a terrifying way. Modern techniques are used effectively to increase the pain of torture and the success of those inflicting...

Broadcasting (21 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: I wish to make a few brief points and I shall not detain the House for long. The director-general said that the BBC was for the free mind what Oxfam is for the hungry. He may have been quoting someone else, but he was correct, and that demonstrates the importance of the BBC's external services and broadcasting in 38 languages at a cost of about £55 million. When there are so many closed...

Broadcasting (21 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: To provide a television licence free for pensioners would cost £150 million. Is the hon. Gentleman suggesting that this should be found by adding to the licence fee paid by others, including the unemployed, or is he suggesting that the Government should supply a subvention?

Orders of the Day — Bill of Rights Bill [Lords] ( 8 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: When one talks of a Bill of Rights one normally thinks of an entrenched Bill of Rights—that is, a Bill of Rights which is difficult to overturn. Lord Salmon, for example, sees a Bill of Rights as something which he calls a statute of liberty, in which nothing can be changed once it has been passed, except by a majority of two-thirds of the House of Commons, a majority of the House of...

Orders of the Day — Bill of Rights Bill [Lords] ( 8 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The United Kingdom signed the European Convention on Human Rights. We undertook to enact legislation within our Parliament so that the rights in the convention would be enforceable within our domestic courts. We are in breach of our undertaking under the convention. The Government do not say outright, "We are against the Bill," because they know that their international obligation is to pass...

Orders of the Day — Bill of Rights Bill [Lords] ( 8 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: That is the point that I am making. It is absurd to believe that European judges are more competent and fit to deal with individual rights and liberty in Britain than British judges. But that is the effect of the present situation. We bypass our judges in favour of European judges. In view of the high quality of the British judiciary, with its long training and ability to construe...

Orders of the Day — Bill of Rights Bill [Lords] ( 8 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: It seems impossible for succeeding Members on both sides of the House to persuade the hon. Member for Orpington (Mr. Stanbrook) that that is and has for many years been the position. That is why the Solicitor-General goes to Strasbourg and why The Sunday Times spent six or seven years waiting in Strasbourg. Reference has been made to delay in our courts, but that is nothing compared with the...

Orders of the Day — Bill of Rights Bill [Lords] ( 8 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: That is correct. The decisions made in Strasbourg are a form of pressure on the high contracting parties. If the British Government are involved——

Orders of the Day — Bill of Rights Bill [Lords] ( 8 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: I should like others to participate in the debate.

Orders of the Day — Bill of Rights Bill [Lords] ( 8 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: That may be so. I am not sure that I would have been pleased had the result been different. I am not prepared to accept that British judges would be less generous in their interpretation of human rights than the judges in Strasbourg. Throughout the world, use of torture continues to grow. There is a continuing increase in the erosion of individual liberty in many countries. In many parts of...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Vandalism ( 7 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: I endorse the need for an increased police presence in areas where vandalism prevails, and particularly where old people living alone are afraid, but does the Minister accept that violent crime among Asian youngsters is far below the average?

Business of the House ( 7 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: In view of the continuing savage fall in employment in the textile industry, particularly in West Yorkshire, which is wreaking havoc on the prosperity of the region, will the right hon. Gentleman consider a further debate on textiles in the near future?

Orders of the Day — Statute Law (Repeals) Bill [Lords] ( 6 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The Bill evokes echoes of our history. It repeals a series of turnpike Acts which governed access to about 11,000 miles in Britain as late as the 1830s. Those travelling along Britain's roads 150 years ago found themselves paying tolls, allegedly for the maintenance of stretches of road, before Governments and local authorities took it upon themselves to maintain the highways to a decent...

Orders of the Day — Supreme Court Bill [Lords] ( 6 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: As there will be only two judges, is it not more advisable for them normally to be equal. so that one is not overawed by the other?

Orders of the Day — Supreme Court Bill [Lords] ( 6 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The essence of the jury system is that a jury should be chosen at random, be representative of the community, provide a fair trial and ensure that defendants are not in the hands of a single judge who might be prejudiced. However, it is unfair to pretend that there are random juries, in the traditional sense, in long trials. The first thing that the judge does in a trial that is expected to...

Orders of the Day — Supreme Court Bill [Lords] ( 6 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The hon. and learned Gentleman is precipitate. If I may develop my argument, first, we should maintain the jury system wherever possible but we should address ourselves to the problem of how to achieve for long and complicated cases a jury at least as competent as is achieved for shorter cases. It cannot be said that juries for long cases are satisfactory. I do not know what thought has gone...

Orders of the Day — Supreme Court Bill [Lords] ( 6 May 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: I am talking about the Supreme Court Bill. The two are tied together in this respect. The Bill contains several useful provisions. Those who will have the duty and responsibility of dealing with those provisions in Committee will have the opportunity to make a useful contribution towards the body of our law. There has been a continual increase in the number of High Court judges. That is...

British Nationality Bill (Allocation of Time): Interpretation (29 Apr 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: It is 33 years since we passed the last British Nationality Act and it may be as long or longer before we pass another. In that context, it is clear that we must get things right in the best way that we can. Time is essential for the consideration of so complicated a measure. It is interesting that in Committee both Government and Opposition were fragmented from time to time. It has not been...

British Nationality Bill (Allocation of Time): Interpretation (29 Apr 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The hon. Member for Petersfield asks me to give way and I am happy to do so, but when I listened to his speech this afternoon I was surprised at his apparent intimate knowledge of what went on in the Committee. My recollection of him is one of a large bulky form which dashed in to vote in Divisions. I did not see much of him during our deliberations. What he said about the hon. Lady, the...

British Nationality Bill (Allocation of Time): Interpretation (29 Apr 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The hon. Gentleman has not said that I sought to prolong proceedings. Indeed, although my contributions were fairly frequent I sought to keep them to a reasonable length. I do not know how long discussion of the Bill will take. Even at this stage the Opposition Government should get together to ensure full discussion of all the major provisions that remain. Perhaps things would not be too bad...


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