Results 121–140 of 596 for speaker:Mr Edward Lyons

Orders of the Day — British Nationality Bill: Decisions Involving Exercise of Discretion ( 4 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: On a point of order, Mr. Deputy Speaker. I said "Aye" on two or three occasions. I thought that I had said it clearly. I am conscious of the passage of time, but I should prefer a Division on the amendment.

Orders of the Day — British Nationality Bill: Decisions Involving Exercise of Discretion ( 4 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: I beg to move amendment No. 105, in page 31, line 17, after 'discretion' insert— 'save where the reason for refusal of an application is that the Secretary of State is not satisfied that requirements of residence or of sufficient knowledge of the English or Welsh language have been fulfilled'. The purpose of the amendment is to compel the Secretary of State to inform applicants why an...

Orders of the Day — British Nationality Bill: Decisions Involving Exercise of Discretion ( 4 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: That is a technical point. Like most hon. Members, I believe that anyone living in a constituency is entitled to ask his Member of Parliament to consider his problem. If hon. Members refuse to help, they may prevent many loyal people from having their cases considered by a Minister. Some may have been denied nationality simply because of a language difficulty. They may have lived here all...

Orders of the Day — British Nationality Bill: Decisions Involving Exercise of Discretion ( 4 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: I am grateful to the right hon. Gentleman for that support. The amendment is a paving stone for arguing that there should be some form of appeal or judicial review. Such a system cannot work unless the reason for refusal is known. The qualifications for naturalisation are set out in schedule 1. They are requirements of residence, of knowledge of language and of good character. The amendment...

Orders of the Day — British Nationality Bill: Decisions Involving Exercise of Discretion ( 4 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The hon. and learned Gentleman has made a lawyer's point. As a lawyer, I do not say that with disrespect, but if the refusal is on the grounds of language difficulty and/or residence, that fact should be stated. If the amendment is technicality defective, there is plenty of time to amend it in another place. The Government will have no problem doing that. We need a more open attitude by the...

Orders of the Day — British Nationality Bill: Decisions Involving Exercise of Discretion ( 4 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The amendment would enable someone who spoke English fluently to smell a rat and to suspect that there had been a mistake in identity if he were refused on the ground that he could not speak English. More than 75 per cent. of applications are refused on the basis of inadequate residence or inadequacy of language. The amendment would cover all those people and would enable them to direct...

Orders of the Day — British Nationality Bill: Decisions Involving Exercise of Discretion ( 4 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The next two amendments to be debated are Social Democratic Party amendments, first, to force the Government to give a reason for refusal, and, second, to deal with the question of appeal. Does the hon. Gentleman propose to support those amendments on the basis that they will give teeth to subsection (1)?

Orders of the Day — British Nationality Bill: Regulations and Orders in Council ( 4 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: This matter was discussed fairly extensively in Committee, but certain matters are worth repeating. I have been told by East Europeans living in my constituency that the fee for naturalisation is too high and that it is an obstacle. That was said to me as recently as last Saturday night in a Latvian club in Bradford. It was also said to me in the Polish Ex-Combatants Club. The Poles who...

Schedule 2: Provisions for Reducing Statelessness ( 3 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The hon. Gentleman does not know what he is talking about.

Schedule 2: Provisions for Reducing Statelessness ( 3 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: rose——

Schedule 2: Provisions for Reducing Statelessness ( 3 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: Is the hon. Gentleman aware that the amendment relates to children born after the Bill is enacted? As I understand it, the hon. Gentleman is directing his remarks to those who are alive now. It is not for me to say that none of his speech has been within the rules of order. However, does he think that a guillotined debate is a proper time for making a filibuster?

Clause 1: Acquisition by Birth or Adoption ( 3 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The debate has been wide-ranging. We ought to remember that for many years every child born in Britain has been British and that the purpose of clause 1 is to eat away at that right by providing that in future one will have to apply tests before deciding whether a child who is born here is British. One point about which there is no argument is that a child born here of parents one of whom is...

Clause 1: Acquisition by Birth or Adoption ( 3 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The answers are simple. First, the illegality may not have been discovered. There could have been entry by deception. Secondly, a person who is working here for a foreign firm may be living here regularly or for a number of years and his child may be born here. But if he has to leave the country for more than 90 days and take the child it will lose its right to citizenship. That could happen...

New Clause 5: British Nationality Bill ( 2 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: With respect, Mr. Speaker, I do not believe that I have. It refers to the wives of citizens of the Commonwealth or Pakistan who shall be entitled on application for …registration as a British citizen, provided that were settled in the United Kingdom at commencement. It covers clauses 5 and 7 and includes wives who are already settled here. They are given five years in which to apply for...

New Clause 5: British Nationality Bill ( 2 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The House has heard the right hon. Gentleman. The new clause works mainly against wives. Since 1973, Commonwealth citizens who have come here have had to pass a language test, so there are fewer of them left to apply for British citizenship. Wives who have come here up to 1981 at present have the right to apply for citizenship and get it automatically if their husbands are British. Those who...

New Clause 5: British Nationality Bill ( 2 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The provision in the Bill which the new clause is designed to counteract provides that wives of British citizens shall be able to obtain British citizenship as of right without having to pass a language test or having to go through other paraphernalia. The effect of the Bill is to say for the first time—it was not so in 1948—that if wives who are in this country do not apply within five...

New clause 4: Right of Appeal ( 2 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: rose——

New clause 4: Right of Appeal ( 2 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: The British-born sons of Poles in my constituency cannot get into the Navy. I take up every case that is brought to me, but people have brought me cases because other hon. Members would not take them up. I agree with the right hon. Gentleman that one should take up every case.

New clause 4: Right of Appeal ( 2 Jun 1981)

Mr Edward Lyons: It has been said that what distinguishes us in our constitution, unwritten though it is, is the fact that we have a number of recourses against acts of the Executive which appear oppressive. We can go to Parliament, to the media and to an independent judiciary. The proposal in clause 41 is to exclude entirely, for the people living in this country, any right of appeal to the courts. That is...


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.