Results 61–80 of 1239 for speaker:Sir Ian Percival

Orders of the Day — Foreign Affairs (14 Nov 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: That point apart, I hope that the hon. Member for West Derby will not think me discourteous if I do not follow him into the maze of his arguments. In under three hours we have toured the world. Some speeches might have been described as wandering around the world. Important as all these subjects are, nothing comes out very clearly from such a debate if we are not careful. I hope that,...

Orders of the Day — Foreign Affairs (14 Nov 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: I thought that he argued that the figures were 1.0 for the Russian side and 1.02 for the other side. Perhaps I have got it wrong.

Orders of the Day — Foreign Affairs (14 Nov 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: I am obliged to the right hon. Gentleman. In that case, 90 per cent. of the force of the point that I thought that he was making disappears immediately. Apparently, the right hon. Gentleman accepts that when it comes down to manpower and weaponry in terms of conventional forces there is still a very great imbalance.

Orders of the Day — Foreign Affairs (14 Nov 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: I do not know what figures the right hon. Gentleman would like to suggest. It seems to most of us who are not too mesmerised by the statistics that one has only to consider Afghanistan to see what an imbalance there is in that part of the world. I accept that there is a danger of over-simplifying, but I repeat the danger of overcomplicating. In regard to our conventional forces, whether we...

Orders of the Day — Foreign Affairs (14 Nov 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: If the right hon. Gentleman is saying that there is some way in which our forces could, without the nuclear deterrent, stand for more than 24 hours against the conventional forces of the USSR, I would say that he is flying in the face of fact and reason. I hope that the message which goes out to our people is that we, at least, can see the light, and that there is no way in which we will give...

Orders of the Day — Education and Family Poverty (13 Nov 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: Disgraceful.

Orders of the Day — Education and Family Poverty (13 Nov 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: The hon. Gentleman knows that I was saying that his is a disgraceful accusation. There is no monopoly of caring on the Labour side.

Orders of the Day — Education and Family Poverty (13 Nov 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: rose—

Orders of the Day — Education Bill [Lords]: County, Controlled and Maintained Special Schools (21 Oct 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: I have listened to almost every word of the debate and formed a view that I wish to express briefly. I ask my right hon. Friend and my hon. Friend the Minister to consider that view before the reply to the debate. I accept that in our schools a large number of teachers are doing a wonderful job in what is a most difficult and sensitive subject. Only this morning I heard two boys being...

Adjournment (Summer) (24 Jul 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: I shall ignore that. It is regrettable that the Committee was not more careful in the language that it used. It is deplorable that the right hon. Member for Dudley, East (Dr. Gilbert) has abused this occasion. I shall support those comments quite shortly. The right hon. Gentleman's whole argument is based on the false premise that it can be assumed that "authorisation" means authorisation by...

Adjournment (Summer) (24 Jul 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: It is no good the right hon. Gentleman shaking his head. He should accept what I say just for the moment, because I have been in such positions. The assumption that "authorised" means authorised by a Minister has no substance whatsoever in law; I have checked that today. The right hon. Member for Dudley, East is proceeding to make the most appalling accusations based on a false assumption.

Adjournment (Summer) (24 Jul 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: The right hon. Gentleman is now trying to escape the point. I am dealing with the right hon. Gentleman's direct accusation of the Attorney-General of disgraceful conduct. He has no grounds on which to make that accusation. He knows perfectly well that my right hon. and learned Friend the Attorney-General has no opportunity today to defend himself. What he will do later, I do not know....

Adjournment (Summer) (24 Jul 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: The right hon. Gentleman is forgetting that what is talked about in paragraph 195 is unauthorised disclosure which amounts to a criminal offence. Those rules about which the right hon. Gentleman is speaking have nothing whatever to do with criminal offences. I am talking about whether it is right to assume that there was a criminal offence here. Authorisation by a Minister is not necessary...

Adjournment (Summer) (24 Jul 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: My right hon. and learned Friend will speak for himself. [HON. MEMBERS: "We wish he would."] It is always the last resort of a person who does not want to hear the argument to giggle about it. I hope Labour Members do not think that that casts any doubt on the argument. My right hon. Friend will speak for himself. In a cooler mood, everybody here, including the right hon. Gentleman, would...

Adjournment (Summer) (24 Jul 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: That is for my right hon. and learned Friend. What is deplorable is the apparent complete unwillingness of Labour Members to consider that they might have made a false assumption even though I have put before them a scenario that is not only possible and which they should have thought of, but so probable that most people here would put more money than they can afford to lose on the...

Business of the House (10 Jul 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: May I draw my right hon. Friend's attention to the fact that early-day motion 991 on the death penalty for terrorists now has the support of 130 right hon. and hon. Members? [That this House congratulates and thanks all those whose efforts played a part in securing the conviction of the Brighton bomber on charges of murdering five people and of those who so recently pleaded guilty in Belfast...

Business of the House (26 Jun 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: Has my right hon. Friend observed early-day motion 991 relating to the penalties available to those convicted of acts of terrorism which has in a short time attracted the support of no fewer than 116 of my right hon. and hon. Friends, representing a wide cross-section of our party, some of whom are well know to have been against the death penalty until now? [That this House congratulates and...

Orders of the Day — Housing and Planning Bill: Redevelopment of Dwelling-House Subject to Secure Tenancy (24 Apr 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: This is a difficult question. I am glad that my hon. Friend has accepted that it is an important one. Could he not go a little further? So far, he has ruled out the possibility of dealing with this in the course of this Bill in the other place. I would ask him to leave it open, because I doubt whether it is as complicated as some people think. I did have something to do with it when I was a...

Libya (16 Apr 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: I agree with one thing said by the right hon. Gentleman the Leader of the Opposition—this should not become a competition in condemnation of terrorism. We all loath it. But having listened to the debate, it seems to me that we would do well now and again to remind ourselves of the features common to the kind of terrorism that we are talking about. The methods employed are desperately evil,...

Libya (16 Apr 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: The hon. Gentleman will realise that I am trying to keep to the rules as to time, and I shall come to that. Of course there is room for differences of opinion, but those hon. Members who have criticised seem to have forgotten that it is much easier to criticise than to do something. Do those who say that it was wrong think that the Prime Minister did not know how serious a decision it was? Do...


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.