Results 21–40 of 1239 for speaker:Sir Ian Percival

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: rose—

New clause 1: Death Penalty ( 1 Apr 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: The right hon. Gentleman misquotes me entirely. Let us leave aside for a moment the question whether it is right or wrong and assume that society concludes that it is right, proper and necessary to do something. His argument leads to the conclusion that, even if the threats were sufficiently severe, society should not do this. That is simply unacceptable.

Wright Court Case (16 Mar 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Is my right hon. and learned Friend aware that the majority of people in this country understand and support his desire to uphold the principle that, in the interests of national security, secrets are secrets and should not be sold for money by those to whom they are entrusted in the course of their duties?

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I am much obliged to my right hon. and learned Friend for his nice comments. I should like to make just one point. Anybody who thinks that the Bill introduces simplicity might be wrong.

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: My hon. and learned Friend the Member for Fylde (Sir E. Gardner) spoke in moving, noble terms of noble sentiments. I, too, congratulate him most warmly. We have both been here for a long time and we have agreed for almost all of that time, so I am sorry to have to disagree with him to some extent in what may be, for both of us, our last year. I wish to express some doubt about what we are...

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I shall give way in a minute, but not until I have finished developing my argument.

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Yes, but perhaps my hon. Friend will allow me to develop this point first. The House must also remember that although the proceedings would start with our judges, who might make what we would think were sensible decisions, the ultimate authority would be with Strasbourg. Our judges might decide the issue of corporal punishment in a way that we thought was sensible, but the complainant could...

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I am not quite sure that I follow that question.

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Let me choose my words carefully. I appeared before the European Court of Human Rights, and that got me into the "Guinness Book of Records." When I first went there, 21 judges were sitting as a court, and I wondered what it would be like. Each country that is a signatory to the convention nominates one judge. On that occasion Luxembourg had nobody that it wished to appoint, so a Canadian...

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: That does not detract from my proposition. I speak as a practical man. I have seen the document that was before the court, when the issue was whether paragraph 2 had been satisfied in relation to trade union legislation. Anybody else who has had the misfortune to see it will agree with the view that I am putting forward: that I merely express some doubt and a word of caution—albeit, I hope,...

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: My hon. Friend will develop his point later, if he catches your eye, Mr. Deputy Speaker. I shall stick to my own argument. Whatever anybody thought when we signed the convention, a great deal of it has come true. Things have moved on, and now we have some experience. I ask the House to have regard to that experience and to the difficulties that have emerged. I do not believe that it adds to...

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: I think that my hon. and learned Friend has overstated it, because no reference was made to the Bill putting anything right. That is something that we have to consider ourselves. I was not in any sense being critical of my hon. and learned Friend. I referred to that matter only as a question of fact.

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Yes, so that another look could be taken at how it would work.

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Let us, when we look at something, look at the other side of it as well. My noble Friend said that he would vote for the Bill not because he agreed with everything in it but because he felt another look could be taken at it. We have all had quite a few other looks at it since then. My noble Friend has always made it clear that he regards sovereignty in Parliament as immensely important, and...

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: We can all have a bit of fun with interventions. However, I want to end my speech so that my hon. Friends can make their own. I query whether clause 4 meets the text that I have been outlining, and right hon and hon. Members can look at it and form their own conclusions. Mine is that I am dubious about it. I am glad to have had the opportunity to speak so early in the debate because I have...

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Our law was changed before the decision at Strasbourg.

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: The railwaymen could not have been put by a Conservative Government in the position in which they were placed by a Labour Government, because we changed the law before the decision, to make sure that they could not be so dealt with.

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: That is quite unreasonable. Right from the start we declared that the measures taken against the railwaymen were totally unfair, and that, at the first opportunity, we would reverse them. It did not depend on fear of the outcome of the hearing at Strasbourg.

Orders of the Day — Human Rights Bill ( 6 Feb 1987)

Sir Ian Percival: Fear had nothing to do with it.

Bill Presented: Security Services (15 Dec 1986)

Sir Ian Percival: Is the hon. Gentleman suggesting that the officer should be his own judge of when to speak? That really is a slippery slope.


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