Results 161–180 of 13831 for speaker:Mr Anthony Eden

Egypt and Israel ( 1 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: The right hon. Gentleman does not know, and nor do I, what the result of the deliberations of the Assembly may be. I am certainly not prepared to answer a hypothetical question without knowing. The reason why we could not accept the Security Council's decision, as I have repeated innumerable times, is because anyone who reads that Resolution, including the preamble, must realise that it was...

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: In view of my right hon. Friend's announcement that there will be a further debate tomorrow, I will, if I may, confine myself today to giving certain facts about the situation which are available to us and to meeting certain of the criticisms which may be in the minds of the House. I will begin by saying this about the United Nations session. Yesterday morning, the United States...

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I thought I made it quite clear to the House.

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I actually used the words which I have repeated. I repeated the words just now which I used yesterday. I made it quite clear that the decisions were arrived at on our responsibility and upon that of the French Government yesterday.

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: We had a very large number of conversations with the United States—

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: Let me finish my sentence. I wanted only to do that. Then I will give way again. There have been a number of conversations between the United States and ourselves upon this situation, and we have expressed our preoccupations and our reasons, dating right back to the Suez Canal seizure, why the matter seemed to us of such overwhelming importance. We have done that at all stages.

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I was going to say there was conversation only yesterday morning between the Foreign Secretary and the United States Ambassador in respect of action to be taken at the Security Council, with which I have already dealt. I do not shelter behind this. [HON. MEMBERS : "Answer."] I will answer. I have said quite clearly to the House, and I repeat, that the decisions taken by us—the French...

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: The moment the French Government and ourselves had reached conclusions as to what we should do, I authorised the despatch of a full message to the United States explaining our action, before even coming to the House. Earlier yesterday, I also informed the United States Government of our reasons for concern and our anxieties as to whether the Security Council was the method to deal with the...

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: If the right hon. Gentleman will be good enough to read the statement which the French and our Government issued at the conclusion of our meeting yesterday—[HON. MEMBERS : "Tell us."] ; I have not the words with me here—he will see perfectly clearly that we made it apparent that if agreement was not reached we should consider ourselves free to take whatever action—

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I now have the words here.

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: The hon. Gentleman is a master at sitting and shouting. He seldom stands.

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: As I said yester day—

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I am not in any way prepared to give the House any details—[HON. MEMBERS : "Resign."]—of the action which will follow the statement which I clearly made yesterday, that British and French forces will intervene in whatever strength may be necessary to secure compliance.

Middle East (Situation) (31 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I made perfectly plain yesterday that if we did not receive an answer we would take military action at the expiry of the period. I am not going to give the House—[HON. MEMBERS : "Oh."]—and the right hon. Gentleman does not ask it—any kind of account of what that action, of what those plans with our Allies, might be ; but I will tell him that we stand by what we said, and we shall carry...

Egypt and Israel (30 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: With your permission, Mr. Speaker, and that of the House, I will make a statement. As the House will know, for some time past the tension on the frontiers of Israel has been increasing. The growing military strength of Egypt has given rise to renewed apprehension, which the statements and actions of the Egyptian Government have further aggravated. The establishment of a Joint Military...

Egypt and Israel (30 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I will endeavour to answer the right hon. Gentleman's questions—first, as regards the Tripartite Declaration. Certainly, the spirit of the Tripartite Declaration, and more than the spirit, operates in our minds.

Egypt and Israel (30 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I hope that the hon. Gentleman will not interrupt me for a moment. This is a very serious matter. It is also true that Egypt's own attitude to the Tripartite Declaration has been, to say the very least of it, equivocal. She has made it quite clear on more than one occasion, certainly in Government-controlled newspapers if not by other means, that she does not wish the Tripartite Declaration...

Egypt and Israel (30 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I used the word "temporarily" deliberately in my statement. There are some who think that we could have invoked other treaties to do what we are doing. I did not want to do that. We have based this action simply on the present situation. We certainly should not wish to keep any British forces there, and I am sure the French would not wish to do so for one moment longer than is absolutely...

Egypt and Israel (30 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: The Security Council are considering the matter now, and it would not be for me to express an opinion as to what they will say, but we thought it right to express our view on the situation and the action we should have to take if this situation continued to develop with its present seriousness.

Egypt and Israel (30 Oct 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: May I say one word in reply to the right hon. Gentleman? At the beginning of his observations, he said that there was a very heavy responsibility resting upon our shoulders. I accept that. That is absolutely and entirely true. These decisions were arrived at after very careful discussions with our French colleagues. What we hoped for, what we asked for—what we prayed for—is that both...


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