Results 81–100 of 13831 for speaker:Mr Anthony Eden

Oral Answers to Questions — United Nations (Government Policy) (13 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: If the hon. Member looks at the Charter, he will find that there were always intended to be provisions to make decisions of the United Nations militarily effective. If what we have done results in that, it will be a gain to the whole world.

Oral Answers to Questions — United Nations (Government Policy) (13 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: Equally certain is the opinion of this nation that if we had waited until the United Nations acted, the fire would not have been put out.

Middle East (Situation) ( 9 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: With your permission, Mr. Speaker, and that of the House, I will now make a statement. The United Kingdom representative at the United Nations voted on 7th November in favour of the Resolution sponsored by the Argentine and other countries. It will be remembered that I said on 1st November: The first and urgent task is to separate these combatants and to stabilise the position. That is our...

Middle East (Situation) ( 9 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: Certainly, so far as the position of Israel is concerned, I think that most people probably have it in mind that there was a very considerable threat to Israel before this matter began. It is our hope—indeed, it has been said from the first; I have said it many times—that there should be a general settlement in this area. That has been the objective that we have constantly had in mind....

Middle East (Situation) ( 9 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: Perhaps I can deal with one or two of those questions straight away. First of all, with regard to the composition of the force, whether it is to be provided by large countries or small countries, I myself have said in the House, more than once, I think, that the criterion for us is not the size of the countries which make up the force, but the efficiency of the force when it can be made up....

Middle East (Situation) ( 9 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: This has, of course, to be decided by the United Nations and worked out by it, and if that is the method which is preferred and an effective force results, we make no objection in principle to it. I have said that in this House before now.

Middle East (Situation) ( 9 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: Please let me finish. The second question which the right hon. Gentleman asked related to the efficiency of the force. Certainly, I think that this is a matter which we must have an opportunity to discuss with the United Nations, because it is really of the first importance. Everybody must realise that the force, when it does its task, must be effective. I see no reason whatever, provided a...

Middle East (Situation) ( 9 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I should like to consider that point. I have not had notice of it. In principle, I should see no objection to that if that was what was required. However, I think one has to be given a fair opportunity to work out the technical details. I have made an offer and we are ready now to discuss the military and technical details. I think they had better be discussed by the officers concerned,...

Middle East (Situation) ( 9 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I think that, on reflection, the right hon. Gentleman will consider the difference between principle in the two answers to which he refers. What I said was, I think—and I speak from recollection—that I was not prepared, naturally, for the exclusion of Great Britain and France from the international organisation. I do not think that any Government of this country could accept that, but in...

Middle East (Situation) ( 9 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: We have voted for the Resolution, we have sent a full reply to the Secretary-General, and we have offered to discuss the military problems. I really believe that right hon. Gentlemen opposite are not trying to assist the creation of this force.

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address ( 7 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I am very grateful to you and to the House, Mr. Speaker, for allowing me to intervene for a few moments again, as I undertook to try to do yesterday. I hoped to be in a position to give the House rather more information about the discussions which are to take place at the United Nations this evening, but the position is that we are at this moment in close and detailed discussion about the...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address ( 7 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I will give the House the position as far as I know it. I admit that it is not very clear. We have had no official intimation about the cessation of the cease-fire. [HON. MEMBERS: "Cessation?"] I am not talking about ourselves. I mean the acceptance of the cease-fire by the Egyptian Government. We have had no official intimation. There have been reports of such a message, but it has not been...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address ( 7 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: Surely. They have not the slightest intention of moving forward from their present positions. They have accepted, as we have, the armistice terms. I am absolutely sure that they will carry them out. One thing we must be clear about, so that there may be no misunderstanding, is that there must be certain movements in respect of administrative forces—not forwards—into Port Said; and to some...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address ( 7 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I am sorry, but without the presence of the Foreign Secretary I am not able to say what the exact timetable of the United Nations Assembly is today. I know that the United Nations is dealing with both subjects. Whether they will deal with both subjects at the same meeting I cannot say.

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address ( 7 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: Yes, Sir, I should hope so, because perhaps the most remarkable feature of the whole of this business has been that, so far as the operation at Port Said yesterday morning was concerned, the whole operation has been carried out by one parachute brigade without any kind of preliminary bombardment at all. Whatever political views one may have on the matter, that, as a military feat, must be...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address ( 7 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I do not think that the hon. Member's description of the Resolution is right. I do not want to debate this, but I do not think that the Resolution talks about "uncompromised nations" at all. I think that one of the problems which the United Nations has to face is whether, if a force of this kind could be created, it should include; the major Powers, or should not include the major Powers but...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address ( 7 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I really think that that is hardly reasonable—[HON. MEMBERS: "Why?"] If there is a position which would give us information which I felt would be of service to the House then, of course, I will do so, but we are trying to conduct, about this very international force, rather elaborate negotiations—because they do concern a large number of countries, with widely different views as to what...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address ( 7 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: The position of Her Majesty's Government is as I stated it yesterday. There is no question whatever in our mind of withdrawal by the United Kingdom and her allies, unless and until there is a United Nations force to take over from us.

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address ( 7 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: It is quite clear that if this force is to come into being, and to be of the size and influence which I think that the House would like to see it assume, it will raise all sorts of questions such as my hon. Friend the Member for Bath (Mr. Pitman) has just raised. I really do not think that I can deal with them here, at this Box, without notice. They are too complex. All I say is that they are...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address ( 7 Nov 1956)

Mr Anthony Eden: I think that I have already explained that that is just one of the matters which are now under discussion and examination. There are two views. One is that the major Powers should be members. There are others who take the view, and it is perfectly arguable, that the major Powers should not be members, provided the force is sufficient. But I really cannot go further than I went yesterday.


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