Results 41–60 of 79 for speaker:Mr Terence Donovan

Orders of the Day — FINANCE (No. 2) BILL: Clause 73. — (Estate duty where policies kept up or effected under settlements.) (22 Jun 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: Will the hon. and gallant Gentleman quote the authority for the last statement he has made?

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill: Clause 5. — (Registers of electors.) (15 Jun 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: I did not intend to intervene in this Debate, but as the other Labour Member of the Electoral Committee is not here, I wish to dissent from what has been said by the hon. Member for Twickenham (Mr. Keeling) that Labour Members of that committee strongly opposed this proposal. I did not. What happened was that the hon. Member for Twickenham put forward this proposal on the basis that because...

Orders of the Day — Representation of the People Bill: Clause 5. — (Registers of electors.) (15 Jun 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: Because the hon. Member for Twickenham withdrew his first draft Minority Report after receiving my letter.

Supply (13 May 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: I feel sure that I have caught the Chairman's eye not because he took me for "a middle-aged bloke, going bald, with a streak of optimism" but rather because it is desirable that there should be a contribution to this Debate, modest though it may bd—and mine will be—from somebody who has no connection with the publishing trade and is not a journalist either on weekdays or on Sundays. The...

Orders of the Day — FINANCE (No. 2) BILL ( 6 May 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: When I wait here for some time to make a speech, I always find my throat getting drier and drier, and now I find myself quite incapable of talking about the beer which has been roundly condemned on this side of the House, or the gin and whisky which received indirect praise from the other side. There are four matters with which I wanted to deal, but in view of the shortness of the time at my...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: Clause 44. — (Rules for the management of prisons, remand centres, detention centres and Borstal institutions.) (15 Apr 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: I raised this matter on the Second Reading. Under the Clause the person who is to be given a proper opportunity of presenting his case is the person who is charged. My experience on other statutes is that if a person claims he is entitled to be legally represented, then express provision is necessary for that purpose. I should be content with the assurance of the Home Secretary that legal...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Payment of costs of defence on acquittal, etc.) (15 Apr 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: I should not like this new Clause, which is an important one, to be passed without some commendation from this side of the Committee as well. It removes a long-standing grievance, and I think the Government are to be wholly congratulated and sincerely thanked for what they have done in this respect. It would also be true to say that the hon. Member for West Leicester (Mr. Janner) took the...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Suspension of death penalty.) (14 Apr 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: I wish to do two things. First, I wish to make a short speech, and second, to address myself more particularly to those Members of the House who are not governed by emotion in this matter, but who are quite prepared to approach it in an objective spirit and take an objective decision. Therefore, the deep convictions, founded on conscience and morals, which make some Members on both sides of...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill: New Clause. — (Suspension of death penalty.) (14 Apr 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: I would like to correct what I think is a popular fallacy. I have experience of the law of Income Tax but I have done a fair amount of criminal work and I sit occasionally as chairman of a criminal court.

Orders of the Day — Purchase Tax (Car Radios) (13 Apr 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: There are two sides to this question. There is the case of the taxpayer, who, having overpaid his tax and wants it back, thinks that a great injustice is being done if the Crown relies on a technical defence. There are also cases—and I have seen them myself—where Treasury officials, through mistakes, sometimes blameworthy sometimes not, have overpaid money, and the subject has relied on...

Orders of the Day — Air Accident, Sywell (Inquiry) (10 Mar 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: On 28th June, 1947, a private aeroplane crashed at Sywell Aerodrome, Northamptonshire, killing the pilot and passenger. The pilot was Mr. E. Brookes and the passenger Mr. J. B. Ryley. Brookes was the holder of the Air Force Cross—an extremely experienced pilot with 2,000 hours of flying to his credit, and in the R.A.F. during the war he had been assessed "above average" on three occasions....

Orders of the Day — Air Accident, Sywell (Inquiry) (10 Mar 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: All this is common ground. The gravamen of the complaint is in respect of the fact that it is not made public.

Clause I. — (Punishment for attempted rape.) ( 5 Feb 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: We have listened to two very powerful speeches, one by the Home Secretary and one from the hon. Member for Oxford (Mr. Hogg). Each of them has stressed that we should not lose sight of the injury inflicted upon the offended person. I quite agree; and I approach consideration of this Bill from that angle, too. It is in approaching it from that very angle that I feel considerable misgiving...

Clause I. — (Punishment for attempted rape.) ( 5 Feb 1948)

Mr Terence Donovan: That is perfectly true. The conclusion I want to draw takes a certain amount of introduction. If juries now, for no visible reason, suddenly find that the penalty is increased from two years to seven years, in my opinion there will be fewer convictions than there were before, and this Bill will defeat itself. For those reasons I very much hope that this matter will be further considered and...

Finance Bill ( 9 Dec 1947)

Mr Terence Donovan: I want to raise a point of a general character in relation to this Bill, but before I do so, may I associate myself with the remarks which have been made by the right hon. Gentleman the Member for West Bristol (Mr. Stanley) about the danger of raising taxes so high that they will have a discouraging effect upon enterprise in this country. I have seen at first hand that cause and effect...

Orders of the Day — Criminal Justice Bill (28 Nov 1947)

Mr Terence Donovan: Although I should like to say a lot about this Bill I have to be as short as the hon. Member for Rugby (Mr. W. J. Brown), and I hope I shall be as much to the point as he was. In the circumstances, I propose to confine my remarks to one or two practical points which seem to emerge from the Bill. Under Clause 16 magistrates in future will not be able to send a child of 17 to prison, but...

Orders of the Day — Parliament Bill (11 Nov 1947)

Mr Terence Donovan: The actual proposal before the House is to reduce the suspensory veto from two years to one, and I am invited to vote against that proposal on the grounds set out in the Amendment, which grounds have been further elaborated in Debate. I want to examine those grounds as fairly and impartially as I can, because I agree with the noble Lord who has just spoken that this is a specially important...

Orders of the Day — Parliament Bill (11 Nov 1947)

Mr Terence Donovan: I was dealing with the resolution of 1907.

Committee of Privileges Report: Cases of Mr. Allig han and Mr. Walkden (30 Oct 1947)

Mr Terence Donovan: I am glad that the point of view expressed by my hon. Friend the Member for Lichfield (Mr. C. Poole) was put forward, because it gives point to the contrary expression of view on the part of those on this side of the House who hold it, and I congratulate the hon. Member on the courage with which he expressed a view which I do not think is held generally in the House. I am not the only Member...


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