Results 61–80 of 556 for speaker:Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid

House of Commons (Select Committees) (12 Nov 1970)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: I do not think this is a profitable argument. The point about pundits is that they tend—certainly in America, where the Specialist Committee system is one of the biggest nuisances which the Government must combat—to have a disproportionate influence on Government activity and legislation. That is my fear. I wish my right hon. Friend's proposals well. I regard this as a genuine attempt...

European Communities (Ministerial Meeting) (23 Jul 1970)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: Will my right hon. Friend accept it from me that, despite the tenor of the questions that have been thrown at him this evening, a very large element of thinking people in this country welcome this start to these negotiations?

Middle East (13 Apr 1970)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: The right hon. and learned Member for Ipswich (Sir Dingle Foot) began by saying that in earlier days the Arab cause was very poorly represented in this Chamber. I have listened to three strongly worded Arab speeches out of the last four. Therefore, on this occasion, in numbers anyway, the Arab cause is pretty well represented. I know that there are many hon. Members who wish to take part in...

Middle East (13 Apr 1970)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: The hon. Gentleman must form his own conclusions. I do not speak for the Israeli Government. I am talking in military terms. There is clearly no military advantage in bombing schools in Cairo, but that is not the point of the argument. If bombs are used, they sometimes fall in the wrong place. I would also have thought that there was no special military advantage in bombing civilian bases in...

Capital Punishment (15 Dec 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: Over the years I have come to have less and less regard for the views of those who have experience in criminal courts. I am expressing my own opinion, as we all do during these debates. During these years, in my constituency two little girls were murdered in the most horrible, disgusting and grievous circumstances. The mothers of those two girls saw me frequently, and I told them time and...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill (18 Jul 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: Having sat through the three months or more during which this Bill and its associated matters have been through the House, and being conscious of the fact that I have contributed as much to these discussions by my silences as by my speeches, I do not intend to spoil my record at this late stage. I am conscious that the House wants to hear my right hon. Friend and come to a decision on this...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Artificial Transactions in Land (17 Jul 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: The Minister will recall that in the much regretted absence of my hon. and learned Friend the Member for Northwich (Sir F. Foster) in Committee, it fell to me to move an Amendment on this subject, to which the Minister gave the best answer for which we could hope at that stage. He said that while the form of clearance procedure which we had proposed was unacceptable to the Government, he...

Oral Answers to Questions — Economic Affairs: Industrial Reorganisation Corporation (26 Jun 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: asked the Secretary of State for Economic Affairs whether he is satisfied that the gross dividend of £750,000 paid by the Industrial Reorganisation Corporation on its public dividend capital of £31 million in the financial year 1968–69 represents an adequate return in present conditions; and if he will make a statement.

Oral Answers to Questions — Economic Affairs: Industrial Reorganisation Corporation (26 Jun 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: Can the right hon. Gentleman say how much more of this artificially cheap trafficking is to be put at the disposal of the I.R.C. in the current year? Should not this matter be brought to the attention of the International Monetary Fund?

Tinkers (West Midlands) (23 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: I should like to begin by thanking you, Mr. Speaker, most genuinely and sincerely for having selected for discussion the subject of gipsies in the West Midlands, which is a burning question in the area. It has a special topicality for discussion at the moment. I have not heard such a long speech from the hon. Gentleman the Member for Glasgow, Craigton (Mr. Millan) since he used to speak on...

Tinkers (West Midlands) (23 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: I am sorry, Mr. Speaker. I do not want to take up the time of the House, but this is essential background to this Adjournment Motion. I believe that if the Joint Parliamentary Secretary had not intervened in this sense, there was a good chance that the Bill might not have been given a Second Reading. There was important Government business following it, and in my view that caused the...

Tinkers (West Midlands) (23 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: The figure that has been given by the Clerk to the Aldridge Council in connection with the earth works is £600. That is not negligible figure. The clerk says that these inhabitants had genuine cause for vehement complaint. So much for Aldridge. Now I turn to the Borough of Walsall. I am glad to see the hon. and learned Member for Walsall, North (Mr. William Wells) in his place. I want to...

Tinkers (West Midlands) (23 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: I have sought throughout to keep emotion out of this because this is an important statement of fact. I do not want to be accused of emotionalism or anything else. I am sure that many parents of children do have those feelings, but these are not open to statistical evidence. I want now to return to the subject of crime, because this is important. The hon. and learned Member for Walsall, North...

Tinkers (West Midlands) (23 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: The hon. and learned Gentleman must forgive my ignorance of the law. I have here the Chief Superintendent's letter describing them. I am sure the intention is that it is basically stealing from premises, because two were offences of office breaking. I do not think that these are cases of violence. The hon. and learned Gentleman knows that industrial towns are not free from local crime. It is...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Charge of Income Tax for 1969–70 (13 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: I beg to move Amendment No. 1, in page 13, line 39, leave out '41.25' and insert '38.75'. I am grateful to the representative of the Liberal Party for allowing me to open the debate. The Amendment is in the names of my right hon. Friend the Member for Enfield, West (Mr. Iain Macleod), some of my hon. Friends and myself. By this cabalistic means, the party to which I am happy to belong...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Charge of Income Tax for 1969–70 (13 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: I would like to make it clear that I am a crypto-back bench Member, resting temporarily on the Front Bench. I would say that I was a pseudo-Front Bench spokesman, were it not for the fact that the transparency of my disguise would deceive no one. The theme for our debate on income tax is best set by an item I saw on the Exchange Telegraph tape on 8th May, headed: Wife threw tax forms on the...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Charge of Income Tax for 1969–70 (13 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: I am grateful to you. Mr. Irving, because despite what my hon. Friend the Member for Worcestershire, South (Sir G. Nabarro) thinks, this is very germane to my argument, which is that the mounting weight of taxation has made people, particularly the relatively modest earners, feel desperate. They are, therefore, particularly prone to accepting the lures of what I would say is less than...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Charge of Income Tax for 1969–70 (13 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: The point I am trying to make is that some very expensive advertising is being carried on, to appeal to small investors, and it is being done because these investors feel that they do not have a chance under present taxation of accumulating any funds. I do not see that that is at all divorced from the Amendment which has to do with the growth of taxation, and income tax. I am suggesting...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Charge of Income Tax for 1969–70 (13 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: I am directing my argument, Mr. Irving, to the taxpayer who pays the standard rate. I have kept away entirely from the taxpayer who pays above the standard rate—in other words, the surtax payer. I respectfully submit that that is perfectly fair. Professor Henry Johnson, in his inaugural lecture at the London School of Economics—it goes back a year or two, but it was quoted by Samuel...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Charge of Income Tax for 1969–70 (13 May 1969)

Major Sir Henry D'Avigdor-Goldsmid: Despite your great vigilance, Mr. Irving, and that of your successors, we have had what can be described as a far-reaching debate. You did your best to curtail it, but perhaps your successors were less successful. The great value of the debate has been that it has shown the difference in philosophy between the two sides of the Committee. We on this side are convinced that one of the things...


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