Results 161–180 of 882 for speaker:Sir Francis Acland

Class Ii.: Colonial Office. ( 9 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I am not going to give way, not because I do not like controversy, on the contrary; but I do not wish unduly to delay the Secretary of State.

Class Ii.: Colonial Office. ( 9 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I excluded the East African Colonies, because I know that in their case there are certain special conditions. We take our position with regard to that general doctrine of the importance of the open door if there is really to be the greatest amount of trade for the Colonies. As I saw my hon. and gallant Friend the Member for the Isle of Wight (Captain P. Macdonald) wanted to cross a sword with...

Class Ii.: Colonial Office. ( 9 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: If my hon. and gallant Friend will look up his phrase in the OFFICIAL REPORT to-morrow, he will see that he said that his interest was rather that the Lancashire cotton industry should flourish than that the Colonies should have increased trade. That is a point of view with which we cannot agree, and against doctrines of that sort we maintain our doctrine of the importance of the open door.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill. ( 3 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I think it would be not out of place if I were to begin by congratulating the Chancellor of the Exchequer, as I do most sincerely, on the way in which he and his team have handled the complicated and difficult questions which have fallen to them in these Budget discussions, which have now been spread over a considerable number of days. When a little charm and sweet reasonableness were...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill. ( 3 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: You have to pay, just as if you had a car. It is voluntary to have a car and it is voluntary to have a wireless set. The two things are exactly on the same basis. There is a definite relation between the number of motor licences and the needs of the roads, because the more licences you have the more cars there are and the more you ought to spend on the upkeep and maintenance of roads. There...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill. ( 3 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I will say no more about that. I thought I was justified in briefly giving our reasons for not supporting the Finance Bill, so far as it relates to those matters. My last point is that, when we are asked to make a contribution, as we are in this Bill, to the needs of defence, the nation has a right to know what the policy underlying those needs will be. That again is a large subject, on...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill. ( 3 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: That is perfectly true. I had understood, however, that a certain right hon. Member of the House was going to develop this type of subject rather considerably to-day. If that is not so, it is, of course, perfectly right to prevent me from doing it in the minor matter on which I was embarking. I will only say this final word, that we should have been willing to vote for the defence provisions...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill. ( 3 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: Has the hon. Member's view anything to do with the fact that the farmers in his constituency do not grow wheat?

Orders of the Day — Tithe Bill. (29 Jun 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I am glad that the alteration was made in Committee which enabled the present incumbents in their present incumbencies not to have a diminished income. That suggestion was first put on the Order Paper in our reasoned Amendment to the Second Reading, and I am glad that it has been possible to carry it out. I must correct the suggestion of the Parliamentary Secretary that that was the only...

Orders of the Day — CATTLE INDUSTRY (EMERGENCY PROVISIONS) (No. 2) ACT, 1935. (29 Jun 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I would like to ask a question on a point which the Parliamentary Secretary did not make clear. As I understand, the subsidy which we are asked to extend now will expire on 30th October, which normally falls in the Recess. Therefore, is it not a fact that if the Government wish to extend the subsidy into the autumn session, they will have to bring in a Bill during the next month? Is that so?...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill.: Clause 19. — (Provisions as to income settled on children.) (15 Jun 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: On a point of Order. It is extremely difficult for ordinary Members of the House, having listened to the Chancellor of the Exchequer proposing an Amendment dealing with what people may have done after the date when the Budget was introduced, to follow a discussion by Members on both sides of the Committee, which may go on to any length, and which deals with a totally different point, raised...

Beamish Colliery, County Durham (Dispute). (11 Jun 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I happen to be a Member who has been casually listening to this Debate without any knowledge of the technicalities of the matter, and like other Members who are not experts, I have been impressed by the very great difficulties of this case on both sides. It is as though an irresistible force of argument by my hon. Friends on this side had come up against an immovable mass, namely, the Act of...

Orders of the Day — Air Navigation Bill.: New Clause. — (Trespassing at liceased aerodromes.) (10 Jun 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: Not unless you put up a notice that you cultivate them.

Orders of the Day — Air Navigation Bill.: New Clause. — (Illumination of new buildings.) (10 Jun 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I hope that the Under-Secretary will think a good deal before he brings forward anything that will carry out the intention of this Clause. The foundation of aerodromes near houses is considered by the ordinary householder as the most appalling nuisance and an affliction, because of the noise, which cannot possibly be escaped, and to have the liability put upon not only new buildings but...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill.: Clause 5. — (Extension and Amendment of 11 and 12 Geo. 5. c. 47.) ( 9 Jun 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I think the Parliamentary Secretary has made a good case for the part of the Clause which we are discussing, and which, so far as it goes, makes possible a concession to importers; but I was glad that he was impressed, as we all were, by the case made out by the hon. Member for Hemsworth (Mr. G. Griffiths), and, as one who also uses a hypodermic needle, sometimes eight or 10 times a day—not...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill.: Clause 6. — (Power to remove or reduce additional duties in respect of certain iron and steel goods.) ( 9 Jun 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I think my right hon. Friend the Member for Keighley (Mr. Lees-Smith) has indicated the reasonable line for the Committee to take, namely, that this Clause should be postponed. We are in a difficulty. I do not think it would be fair to suggest that the letter from the cartel was only read by the Minister because the hon. Member for South Croydon (Mr. H. G. Williams) asked a particular...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill.: Clause 6. — (Power to remove or reduce additional duties in respect of certain iron and steel goods.) ( 9 Jun 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I do not in any way challenge your Ruling, Captain Bourne, but I was wondering whether you had refreshed your memory by consulting the manual of procedure—the latest edition, 1934—in which it states: The consideration of a Clause may, on motion made, be postponed, but the motion may not be made if the Clause has been amended. That is all that is said. No question of Amendment arises here,...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill.: Clause 7. — (Power to add or remove goods to or from free list, and to charge certain duties for periods.) ( 9 Jun 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: Can the Chancellor give us a definite assurance that this procedure will not result in taking out of the control of the House any right with regard to deciding on a report from the Import Duties Advisory Committee which the House has hitherto had?

Business of the House. (28 May 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: In regard to the business for the week after next, does the Prime Minister expect to complete the Committee stage of the Finance Bill on the Tuesday and half of Wednesday, or only to make progress with it?

Orders of the Day — Education Bill. (27 May 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I make no apology for doing what I expect we shall almost all be doing this afternoon, and that is dealing mainly with the question of exemptions. Whatever difference of view we may have about it—and we do differ—most of us will agree that it is rather a pity that our correct procedure, as interpreted by Mr. Speaker yesterday, prevented us from expressing our opinion on some very...


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