Results 141–160 of 882 for speaker:Sir Francis Acland

Clause 1. — (Prohibition of the discharge in and transhipment for Spanish territory of munitions of war front certain ships.) ( 1 Dec 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: As this point has been adequately explained, the House will not want long speeches. I certainly do not want to hear long speeches at this hour nor to have to sit in the Christmas week if I can help it. As was made abundantly clear in the speech of my right hon. Friend and the speech which I made half an hour ago, we attach great importance to the point, and therefore shall support the Amendment.

Clause 1. — (Prohibition of the discharge in and transhipment for Spanish territory of munitions of war front certain ships.) ( 1 Dec 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I beg to move, in page 2, line 4, at the end, to insert: Provided that any such Order in Council shall not have effect until approved by Resolutions of both Houses of Parliament. The object of the Amendment is very simple and clear. The Bill says that at present munitions are not allowed to be carried from this country to Spanish ports, and it therefore proposes to add the prohibition of...

Clause 1. — (Prohibition of the discharge in and transhipment for Spanish territory of munitions of war front certain ships.) ( 1 Dec 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I agree that it is only to bring things in which might be prohibited under the Arms (Export Prohibition) Order. What we are afraid of is a general extension. In these circumstances, I beg to ask leave to withdraw the Amendment. Amendment, by leave, withdrawn.

Orders of the Day — Trunk Roads Bill: Clause 1. — (Transfer of trunk roads to Minister of Transport.) (30 Nov 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: May I raise this point? I understood you to say a little while ago that a road which ended at a river, or something of that kind—if there were no road on the other side—would not be a trunk road. Now that is just what the road in the Minister's constituency does. It does leave off, and I hope your Ruling would not apply so as to take that road out of the list in the First Schedule to the Bill.

Orders of the Day — Marriage Bill. (20 Nov 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I listened very carefully to the weighty remarks of the hon. and learned Member for Ashford (Mr. Spens), and I must confess that I was rather surprised, having in mind the previous history of this question, that an hon. Member who said so candidly that he was in favour—or so it seems to me—of the central principle of this Bill, that which it is proposed to enact by Clause 2, following the...

Orders of the Day — Trunk Roads Bill. (19 Nov 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I desire to apologise to the Minister for not having been able to hear his opening speech; unfortunately, through no fault of my own, I was unable to get here in time. If, therefore, I make, as may be possible, any points that he has made, I hope he will not trouble himself to reply. I shall read his speech with interest to-morrow, and get my information in that way. I am bound to say that I...

Orders of the Day — King's Speech.: Debate on the Address. ( 4 Nov 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: The people who read the Gracious Speech will think of it from several different points of view: What is there in it which interests our particular constituents, or are there points in it which concern one's own particular interests or activities; and among other points of view which, I am sure, one is not singular in thinking about very early and very particularly is this: How will the...

Orders of the Day — King's Speech.: Debate on the Address. ( 4 Nov 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: Surely the levy is to go to the industry, and once that levy Bill is passed the industry will be sure of its money.

Orders of the Day — King's Speech.: Debate on the Address. ( 4 Nov 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: That is very interesting, but we had understood that the levy on the imports of beef was to be earmarked definitely as a subsidy for the producer. If the Government are going to delay any earmarking of the result of that import duty until they have made sure that there will be a better system of marketing conditions, well and good, but we shall have to wait and see how that goes. At any...

Orders of the Day — Import Duties (Import Duties Act, 1932). (28 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: The night is yet young, and it is very tempting to some of us who represent agricultural constituencies to get such little credit as we occasionally can by opposing an Order of this kind, which will to some extent, according to the report of the Committee, though only for a time, affect agricultural prices. On the other hand, we have had a heavy week, and there are signs of sleepiness in the...

Orders of the Day — Education Bill.: Clause 8. — (Power of local education authority to make grants for enlarging, etc., non-provided schools.) (22 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I wonder if anyone has been as unwise as I have been in remaining here 33 hours in order to make a speech a half a minute? The Minister has most thoroughly adhered to the position he took up in Committee upstairs, both in the letter and the spirit, and I think that is wise. If he had accepted the Amendment, the whole basis of our assent to the concessions that were made from the...

Orders of the Day — Cattle Industry (Emergency Provisions) Bill. (17 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: There are one or two matters arising out of the debate earlier in the week that I should like to take up with the Minister. He quoted, with regard to the connection between imports and prices, and quoted, I think, with approval, a passage from what we used to call the Lane Fox report—Lord Bingley's report. He quoted this sentence: The downward course of meat prices has been closely...

Civil Estimates, 1936.: Ministry of Health. (16 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I would like to refer to some of the matters with which the Minister dealt in his very interesting speech, and perhaps to one or two other matters as well. I will begin by saying a few words about housing. I think it will be generally agreed that the progress which has been made, whether under Acts passed by one side or the other, in the great task which amounts almost to the rehousing of the...

Civil Estimates, 1936.: Ministry of Health. (16 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: Yes, I am in close touch with all that and I know that modifications have been made in the last 20 years but the general impression produced on my mind is that the more it changes the more it tends to remain the same thing. I would next refer to the subject of water supplies. I understand that the sum of £1,000,000 set apart for rural water supplies has been expended but, in spite of that...

Civil Estimates, 1936.: Ministry of Health. (16 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: It is over four years.

Civil Estimates, 1936.: PUBLIC HEALTH BILL [Lords]. (16 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I should like to add a few words in support of the Bill. I only came into the proceedings of the Committee at a late stage but I entirely endorse what has been said. The Bill will be of great assistance to local authorities and other persons concerned with Private Bill legislation before this House, and that is one of the main reasons for passing the Measure as soon as we can. The spirit in...

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army.: Director-General of Munitions Production. (14 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: Can the right hon. Gentleman say whether the co-ordination will extend to the supply required by the Navy, or will it deal only with Army supplies?

Class Ii.: Colonial Office. ( 9 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: My right hon. Friend the Member for Caithness and Sutherland (Sir A. Sinclair) dealt so fully with the matters that I wish to bring before the House that little remains for me to say, before giving the Colonial Secretary a further innings. I do not complain in any way of the length of the speech to which we have just listened, which I have very much enjoyed and appreciated. I am very glad...

Class Ii.: Colonial Office. ( 9 Jul 1936)

Sir Francis Acland: I am glad of that, because it relieves me of the necessity of dealing with that subject. I will conclude by referring to a subject which has been discussed to-night, that is, the open door. We have been given a good deal of good advice, almost of lecturing, on that subject, and I am bound to say that I was impressed by what the Secretary of State said about it. I am naturally glad to hear...


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