Results 81–100 of 206 for speaker:Lord Donaldson of Lymington

Extradition Bill (27 Oct 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: My Lords, the noble Viscount, Lord Bledisloe, raised the point about the solicitor who at the last moment is sent to the magistrates' court. It is very important that he can remind himself of the issues from a single document. The noble Lord, Lord Clinton-Davis, suggested that there should be a Foreign Office handout, but it is certain that it would never get to the solicitor's office. The...

Extradition Bill (22 Oct 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: My Lords, before the Minister sits down, perhaps I may ask a question. As I understand what she says, if another EU country honestly issues a warrant in the terminology of the Bill, but it can be shown that in practice the words have a different meaning to that used by its judicial authorities and that someone is being arrested with a view to seeing whether it is possible to prosecute him, it...

Extradition Bill (22 Oct 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: My Lords, I concur in everything that the noble Viscount said. He said it with a great deal more up-to-date knowledge than I have. However, I would add this. It may be that those who are not lawyers will not appreciate quite how different the continental system is from the British system. I particularly have that in mind as there was one occasion when I was a judge in the Queen's Bench...

Extradition Bill (22 Oct 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: My Lords, the second approach—to get rid of Part 1—is the logical approach. If we do not do that we can consider whether it should be confined to terrorist offences. The Minister said that the basis upon which we propose these special arrangements with EU countries is that they all embrace the same view of the rule of law and they are all part of the judicial family. I regret to say that...

Written Answers — House of Lords: Mini Roundabouts: "Filter in Turn" Signs (10 Sep 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: asked Her Majesty's Government: Whether they have any evidence to show that the display of "Filter in Turn" signs at mini roundabouts contributes to a reduction in road rage; and, if so, whether they will encourage highway authorities to display such signs.

Written Answers — House of Lords: Speed Limit Signs (10 Sep 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: asked Her Majesty's Government: Whether, in light of the need for drivers to concentrate on the carriageway ahead rather than on its verges, they will encourage highway authorities to place reminders of speed limitations on the carriageway itself.

Criminal Justice Bill (15 Jul 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: I do not think that that is true. I particularly call in evidence our Home Secretary, Mr Blunkett, who certainly is not of the opinion that a decision by a judge is a decision of the establishment.

Criminal Justice Bill (15 Jul 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: I am persuaded by the noble Earl that I overstated my case. Without going back to further reading, there is ample material in relation to the life imprisonment mandatory sentence, which juries disregarded bringing verdicts of diminished responsibility. I had overlooked that. Where there is a mandatory sentence, I agree that the jury is invaluable. But we ought not to have mandatory sentences.

Criminal Justice Bill (15 Jul 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: I shall probably be drummed out of the profession when I sit down, but that is a risk I must take. Of course I accept that the public has great confidence in jury trials, but I am not sure that it follows from that that they would have no confidence in a trial by a judge alone—or, as I should prefer, by a judge sitting with two magistrates, or something of that order. That does not follow...

Marine Safety Bill ( 1 Jul 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: My Lords, I understand that no amendments have been set down to this Bill and that no noble Lord has indicated a wish to move a manuscript amendment or to speak in Committee. Therefore, unless any noble Lord objects, I beg to move that the order of commitment be discharged. Moved, That the order of commitment be discharged.—(Lord Donaldson of Lymington.)

Criminal Justice Bill (16 Jun 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: My Lords, in an intervention previous to the debate, I described the Bill as monstrous. That was of course a slip of the tongue—although possibly a Freudian one. I meant to say that it was a truly monumental Bill, which it certainly is. Anyone who set out to comment on every part would be deservedly unpopular. I should like to say a word only about Part 7, concerning trials on indictment...

Business (16 Jun 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: My Lords, with the greatest respect to the Minister, it is impossible to cover all the generalities of this Second Reading, even if individual speakers speak only to three parts of the Bill, as for instance I intend to do. Even so, I do not believe that justice can be done to this monstrous Bill, or momentous Bill, in a time-limited debate. I know the noble Lord is not imposing a guillotine...

Marine Safety Bill (13 Jun 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: My Lords, I thank all those concerned who have supported the Bill. The noble Viscount, Lord Astor, said that fire services will have to spend money in advance of an incident and asked how they get it back. The answer is that we are dealing with salvage. In the law of salvage, it has always been accepted that salvors, some of them operating on spec, will incur considerable costs. Those costs...

Marine Safety Bill (13 Jun 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: My Lords, I beg to move that this Bill be now read a second time. The Bill has come to us from another place, having been sponsored there by Dr Brian Iddon, the Member of Parliament for Bolton South East. The overall purpose of the Bill is to increase safety at sea and to reduce the damage that can be caused by pollution from ships. We have seen all too plainly, with the sinking of the oil...

Extradition Bill ( 1 May 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: My Lords, I would be very far from suggesting that the present law of extradition does not require major reform, particularly to get rid of delays. But I have some experience of getting rid of delays in the judicial context. It can be done by strong judicial management and by putting in requirements, which in my day were called leave and I think are now called permission or something else...

Courts Bill [HL] (27 Mar 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: Once again kind flattery by the Minister gets me nowhere. In 1993 ageism was on the ascendant. The position is entirely changed now. It is ridiculous to say, "Oh well, this is piecemeal. We have to look at it all in the light of a European directive". What does it have to do with Europe? It is our judicial system. The Master of the Rolls says that he wants to do this and I have no reason to...

Courts Bill [HL] (27 Mar 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: I did, I hope, make it clear that I was not striking blows in relation to retirement ages. I referred only to post-retirement.

Courts Bill [HL] (27 Mar 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: Perhaps the noble Lord will accept it from me, first, as I said, that this amendment has nothing whatever to do with retirement; and, secondly, that the retirement age is not 70 for a large number of judges. Anyone appointed after 1993, I suppose—I forget the exact date—is subject to 70. Up to that date, the age is 75. As for the noble Lord's idea that any sort of pressure would be...

Courts Bill [HL] (27 Mar 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: moved Amendment No. 149: Page 104, line 19, at end insert— :TITLE3:"Judicial Pensions and Retirement Act 1993 (c. 8) In section 26 (7) (retirement date for holders of certain judicial offices etc.)— (a) at the end of paragraph (a), insert the words "or a person who has been a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary or a judge of the Court of Appeal"; (b) at the end of paragraph (b), insert the words...

Courts Bill [HL] (27 Mar 2003)

Lord Donaldson of Lymington: There have been many times when I wondered whether this day would ever come. The provision was the last amendment. It has been overtaken by some later amendments. But the day has now come and I am very happy to move the amendment. Let me clarify that where the amendment states, "In section 26(7) (retirement date for holders of certain judicial offices etc.)", we are not concerned with...


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