Results 1–20 of 258 for speaker:Lord Stewart of Dirleton

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, a newly recruited prison officer may draw the full occupational pension on reaching state pension age, which is between 65 and 68, depending on their date of birth, and must have had at least two years’ membership within the scheme to be entitled to receive a pension.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, while the Government acknowledge the challenging environment in which prison officers work, we consider that, by comparison with emergency services such as the police or fire brigade, while the environment is a challenging one, it is to an extent controlled, which those other occupations are not. In that context, we consider that 68 is indeed an appropriate age at which to retire.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, the noble Lord and I share a background in the criminal justice system, and I am as aware as he is of the potential for violence to be inflicted on prison officers pursuing their duties. When a prison officer is no longer fit to undertake operational duties, and the operational health practitioner confirms that ill-health retirement is appropriate, the officer would be retired due...

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, in relation to the final matter that the noble Lord raises, in spite of my Scottish background, I regret to say that I am not at this stage able to answer his question directly. However, with his leave I shall look into the divergence between Scotland and England and Wales and revert to him in writing.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, I beg to differ. The importance of rehabilitation is known. Indeed, as we are on the topic of retirement of prison officers, one of the things that prison officers can do under legacy schemes is retire from the Prison Service, take their pension and go back in at occupational support grades. In that capacity, they can do a number of functions, including working in approved premises,...

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, I am sure the House will join me in acknowledging my noble friend’s service as a prison visitor. Although it is the case that police and fire service schemes have a lower retirement age of 60, employees in those professions contribute significantly more of their salary to their pensions—12% for police officers and 14% for firefighters —whereas prison officers pay only 5.4% of...

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, it is two years.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: A prison officer can retire at an age between 65 and 68. That is now in line, according to the alpha scheme under which prison pensions are paid. A person on the scheme must have had at least two years’ membership within the scheme to be able to receive a pension.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, it is dependent on the assessment carried out by occupational health as to the person’s capacity.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: I am grateful to the noble Baroness for her clarification of the point, which perhaps was obvious to your Lordships at the outset. As I understand it, it will be a matter of occupational health assessment. I will clarify that position and write to the noble Baroness, as she requests.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, the noble Lord anticipated that this would lie outwith my brief. I regret to say that I am not in possession of the terms of the statement to which the noble Lord referred by the Prisons Minister in the other place—

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: The Pensions Minister —in that case, my information is even further away from what the noble Lord asked, so I will, with his leave, have to revert to him on that point in writing.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, a newly recruited prison officer may draw the full occupational pension on reaching state pension age, which is between 65 and 68, depending on their date of birth, and must have had at least two years’ membership within the scheme to be entitled to receive a pension.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, while the Government acknowledge the challenging environment in which prison officers work, we consider that, by comparison with emergency services such as the police or fire brigade, while the environment is a challenging one, it is to an extent controlled, which those other occupations are not. In that context, we consider that 68 is indeed an appropriate age at which to retire.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, the noble Lord and I share a background in the criminal justice system, and I am as aware as he is of the potential for violence to be inflicted on prison officers pursuing their duties. When a prison officer is no longer fit to undertake operational duties, and the operational health practitioner confirms that ill-health retirement is appropriate, the officer would be retired due...

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, in relation to the final matter that the noble Lord raises, in spite of my Scottish background, I regret to say that I am not at this stage able to answer his question directly. However, with his leave I shall look into the divergence between Scotland and England and Wales and revert to him in writing.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, I beg to differ. The importance of rehabilitation is known. Indeed, as we are on the topic of retirement of prison officers, one of the things that prison officers can do under legacy schemes is retire from the Prison Service, take their pension and go back in at occupational support grades. In that capacity, they can do a number of functions, including working in approved premises,...

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, I am sure the House will join me in acknowledging my noble friend’s service as a prison visitor. Although it is the case that police and fire service schemes have a lower retirement age of 60, employees in those professions contribute significantly more of their salary to their pensions—12% for police officers and 14% for firefighters —whereas prison officers pay only 5.4% of...

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: My Lords, it is two years.

Prison Officers: Occupational Pension - Question (16 Jun 2022)

Lord Stewart of Dirleton: A prison officer can retire at an age between 65 and 68. That is now in line, according to the alpha scheme under which prison pensions are paid. A person on the scheme must have had at least two years’ membership within the scheme to be able to receive a pension.


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