Results 121–140 of 863 for speaker:Matthew Pennycook

Written Answers — Home Office: Religious Buildings: Security (25 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the oral contribution of the Minister for Security and Economic Crime on 18 March 2019, Official Report, column 793, whether he has reviewed the funding for protected security measures for mosques.

Written Answers — Department for Transport: Blue Badge Scheme (24 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 13 February 2019 to Question 218834 on Blue Badge Scheme, on what date the guidance to local authorities on changes to the Blue Badge scheme extending eligibility to those with less visible conditions will be issued.

Climate Change Policy (23 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: I join others in acknowledging the progress made under successive Governments, but the truth is that, unless the status of emissions reduction is raised in this Government, and the UK’s response to climate crisis is driven vigorously from the centre so that all Departments are forced to act, we will continue to fall short. With that in mind, how well prepared does the Minister think the...

South-Eastern Rail Franchise (23 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: The franchise specification promised extra capacity, new rolling stock, greater frequency of trains and 15-minute Delay Repay, but my constituents will now not see those improvements for at least another seven—perhaps 12—months. What specifically is the Department going to do to improve services for passengers on Southeastern throughout the period of the franchise extension?

Climate Action and Extinction Rebellion (23 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: The Minister will know that over half of the UK’s planned carbon reduction is tied up in some way or another with EU regulations and that EU agencies are key to enforcement. Assuming that the Government’s new office for environmental protection is ever established, will it have a climate change enforcement remit? If not, why not?

Written Answers — Department for Transport: Level Crossings: Greenwich (15 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with Network Rail on the proposed closure of the Angerstein pedestrian level crossing as a result of upgrade works.

Written Answers — Department of Health and Social Care: Sickle Cell Diseases: Prescriptions (12 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 7 December to Question 198332 on Sickle Cell Diseases: Prescriptions, what assessment he has made of the effect on BAME patients of his policy not to include sickle cell anaemia in the list of conditions for which a medical exemption certificate can be obtained.

Written Answers — Treasury: Mortgages: Islam (10 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 14 March to Question 229779, which four high street banks offer Sharia-compliant home purchase plans.

Exiting the European Union (Sanctions): Section 1 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019 (9 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: The motion before us is a straightforward one. I note the Solicitor General’s remark that he did not want to be here, but the more pertinent point is that we should not have found ourselves here. When Parliament voted overwhelmingly to give the Prime Minister the authority to trigger article 50 and begin the negotiations, we never expected that we would be in this position two years later....

Exiting the European Union (Sanctions): Section 1 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019 (9 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: My hon. Friend makes a very good point. Conservative Members tell us that we have had no influence whatsoever throughout the duration of our membership but that if we stay in we will be able to exert influence in a way that is wholly irresponsible for the functioning of the Union.

Exiting the European Union (Sanctions): Section 1 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019 (9 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: The honest answer is that we all know that 30 June is not a particularly realistic proposition and that the Prime Minister was forced to propose that date more for reasons of party management. She has, in a sense, contracted out the decision to the EU. We would expect the Government to accept any reasonable extension that goes beyond 30 June, with the proviso that if this House approved and...

Exiting the European Union (Sanctions): Section 1 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019 (9 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: I entirely agree with my right hon. Friend. Events have clearly overtaken us since the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019 was first conceived, with the Prime Minister having already written to the President of the European Council indicating her intention to seek an extension until 30 June. As I have said, we wholeheartedly support the Government’s efforts to secure one; indeed, that is...

Exiting the European Union (Sanctions): Section 1 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019 (9 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: I will give way one final time, because I know that many Members wish to speak.

Exiting the European Union (Sanctions): Section 1 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019 (9 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: I entirely agree with the hon. Gentleman that this is a failed strategy. As I will come on to say, for any viable proposition to be accepted, there has to be real movement from the Government. It was on that basis that the Opposition agreed to substantive talks with the Government in the national interest. As you will be aware, Sir, a further round of talks is taking place as we speak, and we...

Exiting the European Union (Sanctions): Section 1 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2019 (9 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: I am not going to give way again. Finally, honesty is also required about the obligations that any extension beyond 22 May might entail. That includes being honest with ourselves and the public about participation in the European Parliament elections, abiding by a duty of sincere co-operation, and any other reasonable conditions that the EU might set. There is no question but that the House...

Brunei: Loan Charge (4 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: My hon. Friend makes an important point. One of the most iniquitous aspects of this is the fact that the promoters of these schemes are not being pursued. Does he know of any who have been prosecuted to date?

Exiting the European Union: Article 50 Extension (4 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: Last night, the House voted to prevent a disastrous no-deal Brexit and to exert greater control over the process of extending article 50. The Secretary of State’s views on an extension are well known, but will he confirm that when the European Union (Withdrawal) (No. 5) Bill returns from the other place, he and the Government will comply with the spirit of it and dutifully seek a further...

Exiting the European Union: Article 50 Extension (4 Apr 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: The House will have noted—I think with disappointment—the Secretary of State’s attempts to undermine the clear will expressed last night. The Opposition have no doubt that the Lords will discharge their duties quickly and efficiently in the circumstances. Given the clear will of the House as expressed in the Bill’s passage last night, I ask him to set out his view at this stage about...

EU Exit Day Amendment (27 Mar 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: I rise on behalf of the Opposition to support the motion. As the Minister made clear, this statutory instrument is a necessary one, and it should be entirely uncontroversial. As the House knows, in response to the Prime Minister’s letter of 20 March to the President of the European Council, the Council agreed to an extension of the article 50 process until 22 May, provided that the...

EU Exit Day Amendment (27 Mar 2019)

Matthew Pennycook: I thank the hon. Gentleman for raising that point, as he has in recent days. I think that it can be done either day—that is the short answer. There are different legal opinions on which creates the least amount of confusion and potential for legal challenge, but the Government have decided to do it this way, and we support the statutory instrument as a means to do so. Those who take issue...


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