Results 1–20 of 422 for speaker:Paul Scully

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q Coming back to stop-and-search, can you just outline what changes have happened in your stop-and-search over the last two, three or four years? How have you approached it?

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q Are there any more changes that could be made, such as regulations or guidance, to tackle what you were just describing to Mary Robinson— tackling them at a wider perimeter, rather than their coming in toward a fight and then you doing the stop-and-search?

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q In the briefing we have here, it says you are particularly interested in the new powers that are given to police officers to deal with acid attacks on individuals. In what way are you interested in that?

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q You talked about zombie knives. Is there a particular profile of people or groups that are escalating to zombie knives, machetes and the like?

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q Finally, you talked about the game “Fortnite”. Are you doing anything about demonstrating the actual consequences, with graphic stuff?

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: “This is what it is like?”

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q That presumably includes the non-gang stuff. We heard the other day how 75% of the people St Giles Trust was working with are non-gang. Would that include them?

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: You might duplicate some of what you have just said to Louise Haigh, but I just want to clarify some things. I have your biography here, Tony. You say that the Bill should make it a specific offence toQ “Attempt to purchase corrosive substances and knives underage.” That should be criminalised. You have talked about that, but we heard in evidence this morning and previously...

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q I should have prefaced my remarks by saying that I do feel for retailers, who are putting themselves in considerable danger, just to make a living, whether we are talking about counterfeiting or other issues with tobacco, alcohol and all these restricted items. Picking up on what you said, Doug, about Scotland, what is the impact of that difference in the laws in Scotland about tobacco?

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q They think that is partly because underage people underage fear criminalisation.

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q On the other two, about intimidating or assaulting a worker enforcing the age restrictions in relation to any sale, I have a point of clarification on the evidence we are receiving. They are clearly criminal offences already. Assault—you used the word assault—is a criminal offence. You can talk about messages, but I am always wary about embedding anything in primary legislation...

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q So you envisage different sentencing.

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q There is one question that follows on from that about distribution. I was explaining to another panel that I went down the high street in Sutton, in my constituency, with a couple of anti-knife charities, and different shops were doing different things. There is obviously the voluntary code at the moment, but it was inconsistent. A lot of people were not aware of it. So, regarding display,...

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Either under lock and key, or behind the counter—whatever.

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q You represent retailers as well as shop workers, do you not?

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Just the workers. One of the things I noticed when I went round last year—one of the issues, I suppose, for retailers—is that the more difficult you make it for someone to access the product, to feel the product, or whatever, the less likely they are to buy it. So you have the defence aspect. You want to protect your workers. You want to ensure that people are not just swiping the...

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Q Forgive my ignorance, but the distributive bit—the “D” of USDAW—does that include distributors such as deliverers or anything like that? Do you have an angle or a view on what might happen to distributors?

Public Bill Committee: Offensive Weapons Bill: Examination of Witnesses (19 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: Yes. What might happen to the people who are actually out and what about if there are unintended consequences?

Domestic Abuse Victims and Family Courts — [Joan Ryan in the Chair] (18 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: It is pleasure to serve under your chairmanship, Ms Ryan. I congratulate the hon. Member for Birmingham, Yardley (Jess Phillips) on securing the debate and on her amazing and powerful speech. Hansard does not record blushes, but she has done a fantastic job, as ever, on an important subject. When we talk about domestic abuse in this place, there is often a lot of commentary along the lines...

Govia Thameslink Franchise (18 Jul 2018)

Paul Scully: I welcome the hard review into GTR, which still has a tin ear when it comes to constituents who complain about their travel on the Sutton to Wimbledon loop. I also welcome the Glaister review, which is looking at the relationship between Network Rail, GTR and the train operating companies. What more can the Minister do to bring track and train back together in smooth operation?


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