Results 141–160 of 2437 for speaker:Stuart McDonald

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 15 - Preparatory conduct (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: I beg to move amendment 52, in clause 15, page 13, line 6, leave out “in preparation for” and insert “which materially assists”. This amendment ensures that only actions materially contributing towards to acts prohibited by this section will be criminalised.

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 15 - Preparatory conduct (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: Clause 15 criminalises conduct that is preparatory to some of the offences we have debated. It is fair to say that this is another amendment that I might have approached slightly differently had I been able to draft it in the light of the evidence session on Thursday, rather than in advance of it. Obviously, this clause was widely welcomed at that evidence session, and I accept that evidence....

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 15 - Preparatory conduct (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: That is a perfectly legitimate question and I suppose that ultimately it would be down to the judge to decide what is meant by a material contribution. As I say, putting a jacket on—again, I do not want to be flippant—could be about anything. Does it bring whatever is planned closer to fruition? I do not know. It could be more readily argued that purchasing equipment materially takes...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 13 - Foreign interference: general (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: On that basis, I beg to ask leave to withdraw the amendment.

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 13 - Foreign interference: general (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: I beg to move amendment 51, in clause 13, page 11, line 26, leave out “England and Wales” and “any part of the United Kingdom”. This amendment would mean that “condition A” for the offence of foreign interference would be met by conduct outside the UK that would be an offence in any part of the UK.

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 13 - Foreign interference: general (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: I will be brief. Clause 13 introduces a general offence of foreign interference that is punishable by up to 14 years in prison. As with clause 12, we support the broad idea—indeed, the structure of the offence appears to make sense—but it is a fairly novel departure for this country. I look forward to hearing the Minister talk us through precisely how the provision will work given that it...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 12 - Sabotage (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: I echo much of what the shadow Minister, the hon. Member for Halifax, said. As ever, I have slight concerns about the breadth of the foreign power condition and how that might interact with sabotage—for example, if a protest on behalf of one of the aforementioned non-governmental organisations causes some damage to a site. Of course, such protestors should face criminal law, but I would...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 7 - Meaning of “prohibited place” (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: Clause 7 and the Government amendments to it seem to make sense; my concern is about clause 8. I read the exchange that the shadow Minister referred to, when she asked the Law Commission about the broad powers in clause 8; it was one of the very rare occasions when I was not absolutely convinced by the answer that came back. At the end of the day, clause 7’s definition of “prohibited...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 4 - Entering etc a prohibited place for a purpose prejudicial to the UK (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: That is useful and it might answer my question. The offence is committed if somebody approaches or is “in the vicinity of a prohibited place”. That obviously covers the peace camp. Is the Minister saying that at that stage there is nothing prejudicial to the UK’s safety and interests, and that such action only becomes prejudicial to UK safety and interests when people take further...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 4 - Entering etc a prohibited place for a purpose prejudicial to the UK (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: The debate has been useful, particularly in relation to protestors, and it is useful to know that, apparently, the Minister’s view is that protestors approaching or being in the vicinity of a prohibited place will not necessarily engage the clause because, at that stage, the activity is not prejudicial to the interests of the United Kingdom. Something more is required before that part of...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 3 - Assisting a foreign intelligence service (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: I am grateful to the Minister for his response, but it is important to work through hypothetical examples so that we can understand the scope of the Bill. I absolutely get his explanation as to why there is a distinction between activity inside and outside the UK, and he briefly mentioned the idea of a friendly foreign intelligence service—in my example, the Estonian intelligence...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 4 - Entering etc a prohibited place for a purpose prejudicial to the UK (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: I beg to move amendment 50, in clause 4, page 5, line 9, at end insert— “(7) No offence is committed under subsection (1) if the conduct is for the purposes of protest unless the conduct is prejudicial to the safety of the United Kingdom.” This amendment would restrict the circumstances in which access to a prohibited place for the purposes of protest would amount to an offence under...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 4 - Entering etc a prohibited place for a purpose prejudicial to the UK (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: It is obvious what the amendment is getting at: it is about protest rights, which were raised by my right hon. Friend the Member for Dundee East, who unfortunately cannot be with us today. We all broadly see what the Government are trying to achieve. Clause 4 builds on the Law Commission recommendations. It protects prohibited places against entry etc. for purposes prejudicial to the UK....

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 2 - Obtaining or disclosing trade secrets (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: That is one of a couple of issues that I have. I would like the full information on why the offence can take place only outside the United Kingdom if it is in respect of possession by a United Kingdom national, as opposed to a UK resident or any other description of persons. I do not know whether the Minister can answer that now, but it would be useful to understand it.

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 2 - Obtaining or disclosing trade secrets (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: I have three short points building on what Members have already raised in relation to this clause. First, as raised by esteemed colleagues from the Intelligence and Security Committee, there is a question mark over what happens if somebody recklessly starts dishing out trade secrets, not directly to somebody in way that meets the foreign power condition but in a way that makes that inevitable...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 3 - Assisting a foreign intelligence service (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: I beg to move, amendment 49, in clause 3, page 3, line 30, leave out paragraphs (a) and (b) and insert “activities which are prejudicial to the safety or interests of the United Kingdom.”

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 3 - Assisting a foreign intelligence service (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: On the face of it, the offence of assisting a foreign intelligence service in the UK or, in the case of UK persons, anywhere else is long overdue. Under the Bill, the offence is rightly a serious one and is capable of seeing a person in prison for 14 years. We have tabled the amendment to push the Government on whether they have got the scope of the offence right, to ensure that we do not...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 1 - Obtaining or disclosing protected information (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: I am grateful to everyone who has taken part in the debate and to the Minister for his response. As I say, I absolutely accept the case for a clause such as this one. However, the Minister’s explanation of the protections in place in respect of the two scenarios that I outlined falls a long way short of what I would regard as satisfactory. I outlined three solutions or protections. One was...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 1 - Obtaining or disclosing protected information (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: That is a fair point. In the light of the lack of satisfactory safeguards we have heard this morning, we may have to revisit that question. There is an issue of scope in relation to sticking that into the 1989 Act, but I do not see any reason why we could not include it in some of the offences in this Bill. Unless the Government can come up with better safeguards than have been offered this...

Public Bill Committee: National Security Bill: Clause 1 - Obtaining or disclosing protected information (12 Jul 2022)

Stuart McDonald: I beg to move amendment 46, in clause 1, page 1, line 10, leave out “prejudicial” and insert “damaging”. This amendment seeks to clarify the tests to be met before the offence of obtaining or disclosing protected information is committed.


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