Results 121–140 of 514 for speaker:Lord Green of Deddington

Written Answers — Home Office: Asylum (26 Jan 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: To ask Her Majesty’s Government how many asylum applications have been made in each of the last five years by applicants who entered the UK on a student visa; what were the nationalities of each applicant; how many of those applications were refused, and how many unsuccessful applicants were subsequently removed.

Population Increase: Migration — Question (28 Jan 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of the projected increase in population of the United Kingdom between mid-2015 and mid-2030, if net migration were reduced to 265,000 per year, the high-migration assumption in the latest official population projections.

Population Increase: Migration — Question (28 Jan 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: My Lords, I thank the Minister for his response and for the policy he has outlined. We all recognise the benefits of controlled immigration, but is he aware that the total population increase projected is the equivalent of the combined populations of Birmingham, Leeds, Glasgow, Sheffield, Bradford, Manchester, Edinburgh and Bristol, plus eight other cities the size of Cardiff, Leicester or...

Immigration Bill — Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (1 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: My Lords, I find myself once again in a minority of one in the Committee, but I am reassured that I am not in such a minority in the country as a whole. The Bill and these amendments should be considered in a wider context. The removal of immigration offenders is central to the credibility of any immigration system. Furthermore, detention is an essential component of the removal process. Of...

Immigration Bill — Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (1 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: Yes, I certainly agree that detention is a very expensive business in all circumstances; that is true. The people I would be most concerned about are those who plan to come here as economic migrants and who would have no right of asylum. They are the people who need to be deterred. It is not so much public opinion; it is having an asylum system which is seen to be effective. By all means,...

Immigration Bill — Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (1 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: Yes indeed, but I would imagine that the conditions are very different in Hong Kong and to a certain extent in Belgium. You have to look at the circumstances that you find in a particular country. What we have here is a very large illegal population which people can quite easily join. I am not against looking at the kind of alternatives being suggested, but let us be pretty sure that they are...

Immigration Bill — Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (1 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: The noble Baroness’s point is rather similar to the point she made about bail earlier in the debate. The term “immigration offenders” is a broad term and applies to anyone who does not have, or no longer has, a legal right to be in the UK. It could be a whole range of people who do not have a right to be here; they have not taken opportunities for a voluntary return, or even an assisted...

Immigration Bill — Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (1 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: Not when I use the term, and I do not think that it applies to those people. It applies to those whose cases have been rejected, and rejected on appeal, and they do not return home when they could do so.

Immigration Bill — Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (1 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: May I give one example of how this arises? There are some countries that require an interview with their consul in London to re-document someone who is here as an illegal immigrant and in detention. That requires an interview to which the person in detention has to agree. If there is a time limit of a month, he will know perfectly well that all that he has to do is to refuse the interview for...

Immigration Bill: Committee (4th Day) (3 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: My Lords, perhaps it is time for a different point of view on this subject. I have no difficulty with Amendment 227, which of course concerns children, but I would like to speak in favour of Clause 34 in respect of cases that do not involve children. In such cases, the aim should be to confine the application of the clause to vexatious appeals, which would help to speed up the process, as the...

Immigration Bill — Committee (4th Day) (Continued)8.49 pm (3 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: My Lords, I am afraid that we are not quite of one mind in this House. I take all the points that have been made and I entirely understand the sympathy that has been expressed for individual cases. However, we have to look at this in a wider context. This, after all, is not the 1930s. We face a refugee crisis in Europe which is absolutely without precedent. As the noble Lord, Lord Kennedy,...

Immigration Bill — Committee (4th Day) (Continued)8.49 pm (3 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: Yes, I understand that. I am really pointing to what some Members are seeking as the result of that review—and even that would not be the best step to take at this point.

Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Funding — Question for Short Debate (9 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: My Lords, I should like to speak in support of the points made so eloquently and powerfully by my noble friend Lord Luce in his opening speech. I await with anticipation the contribution of my noble friend Lord Kerr, who ran the service for five years and who should certainly be listened to. For my part, I should like to offer a view from the coalface at which I strove for some 35 years,...

Written Answers — Home Office: Immigration Rules: EEA Nationals (12 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether an EEA national residing in the UK who wished to bring a non-EU spouse into the country would, under the draft Decision by the European Council published on 2 February, have to meet the requirements for salary, and the spouse the conditions for language, as are required of a British citizen and set out under part 8 of the UK Immigration Rules.

Written Answers — Home Office: Asylum (16 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: To ask Her Majesty’s Government what assessment they have made of whether, were the UK to leave the EU, they would be obliged to consider the case of an applicant for asylum who was known to have arrived directly from a safe country; and if so, as a result of which treaty or instrument.

Written Answers — HM Treasury: Social Security Benefits: EU Nationals (22 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: To ask Her Majesty’s Government what specific benefits are covered by the proposed safeguard mechanism set out in paragraph 2(b) of Section D of the draft Decision of the European Council published on 2 February; in particular, whether (1) Child Tax Credit, (2) Working Tax Credit, and (3) Housing Credit will be included in the proposed restrictions on access to in-work benefits.

Written Answers — Department for Work and Pensions: Universal Credit: EU Nationals (24 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether the proposed restrictions on access to in-work benefits mentioned in paragraph 2(b) of Section D of the draft Decision of the European Council published on 2 February will apply to Universal Credit, and if so, to which elements of Universal Credit those restrictions will apply.

Migration - Question (29 Feb 2016)

Lord Green of Deddington: To ask Her Majesty’s Government what is their assessment of the most recent quarterly migration statistics.


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