Results 1–20 of 112 for speaker:Lord Strasburger

Investigatory Powers Bill - Commons Reasons (2 Nov 2016)

Lord Strasburger: I thank the noble Earl for giving way. I would like to share with him a direct quotation from one of the six members of the Leveson inquiry—someone with whom I spoke this morning. He said, “The consultation announced this week is just a shabby stunt, probably concocted by Paul Dacre, to defer the betrayal of the victims of press abuse—past and future—until this Bill...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Report (3rd Day) (19 Oct 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, if the noble Earl is so confident that none of the unintended consequences listed in Amendment 252A can occur, and that the Government do not want them to occur, what is his objection to putting them into the Bill?

Investigatory Powers Bill - Report (3rd Day) (19 Oct 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, I shall rise to that opportunity. Amendment 251, in the name of the noble Lord, Lord Harris, and my noble friends Lord Paddick and Lady Hamwee, addresses one particular kind of encryption—namely end-to-end encryption—and it is very good as far as it goes, which is end-to-end encryption. My own Amendment 252A is also in this group and is complementary to Amendment 251. It...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Report (2nd Day) (17 Oct 2016)

Lord Strasburger: Amendment 118A seeks to prevent the creation and collection of internet connection records. My noble friend Lord Paddick has explained why ICRs are of little security value, and that they would be very difficult and expensive to collect and make use of. The only democracy to try was Denmark, which gave up after years of fruitless effort. It tried again at the beginning of this year with a...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Report (2nd Day) (17 Oct 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, I rise to speak to Amendments 100C, 100D and 100E which have been very ably explained by my noble friend Lord Paddick. When vague and non-specific legislation comes before us, it is perhaps because its authors are unable to be more precise because they have not thought it through or because they choose to not share the details with us. Whichever reason applies in the case of the...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (6th Day) (12 Sep 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, I had the privilege of sitting on the Joint Committee on the Bill and on the Joint Committee on its precursor, the Communications Data Bill, three years earlier. That puts me in a position to inform the House about one example of how technology has come to this area of law and the Government’s attitude to it. In the earlier Committee three years ago, the subject of the...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (5th Day) (7 Sep 2016)

Lord Strasburger: The noble Earl spoke at some length about the utility of bulk personal datasets to the intelligence agencies, but he did not answer my question, which was generated by the revelation in Mr Anderson’s report that bodies other than the intelligence agencies have access to bulk personal datasets. Which other bodies have access to bulk personal datasets?

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (5th Day) (7 Sep 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, I would like to put three questions to the Government, which arise from Mr Anderson’s latest report. There are not many surprises in the report but one of them—certainly to me and most other people who follow these matters—was the revelation that bulk personal datasets are used by agencies beyond the intelligence agencies. Perhaps the Minister could give us some...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (19 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, this debate on who should appoint the judicial commissioners was discussed at length in the Joint Committee, and we heard lots of evidence on it. The conclusion was that the commissioners might be a little more independent if they were appointed by the Lord Chief Justice rather than by the Prime Minister. Certainly, the perception of their independence would be greatly enhanced if...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (19 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: I just wonder whether all the expenditure that the Minister is listing does not apply just as much to the commissioners as to any commission.

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (3rd Day) (Continued) (19 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, my noble friend is quite right: I feel the need to intervene on Amendment 176A. There seems to be a strong consensus among the bodies that considered the Bill in its draft stages and beforehand that there should be a commission rather than commissioners. The Joint Committee made this very clear in its recommendation 114: “It is unclear to us why the Home Office chose to create...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (3rd Day) (19 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, while my noble friend searches for his notes, would it be appropriate for me to make my short speech on this matter? No? I was just trying to help.

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (3rd Day) (19 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, the Committee will get a feeling of déjà vu. I rise to speak to Amendment 159 and others, and start by acknowledging that equipment interference—hacking, in common parlance—with a person’s computer or phone can be justified by known or suspected threats or by an actual incidence of serious crime. However, I still have two concerns. Some types of hacking...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (3rd Day) (19 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, I thank the House for an interesting and lively debate, which this subject absolutely deserves. I am somewhat disconcerted by an assertion made by the Minister and one or two other noble Lords. Just because the Bill has been heavily scrutinised—I fully recognise that, and if it is the most scrutinised Bill in the history of this House, so be it—it does not mean that we...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (3rd Day) (19 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: I assure my noble friend and the noble Lord, Lord King, that the report by the Joint Committee was not unanimous. We had something like 10 divisions, and for some peculiar reason I found myself on the wrong end of most of them.

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (3rd Day) (19 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, I rise to speak to Amendment 156A and cite the simple facts about internet connection records. They do not currently exist, would be very difficult and costly to manufacture, have very limited usefulness and collecting and storing them, far from making us safer, would expose everyone in Britain who uses the internet to new and serious risks. In addition, they are highly intrusive...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (3rd Day) (19 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, I rise to speak to Amendment 147A in my name and that of my noble friend Lord Paddick. My noble friend also has Amendment 156A in this group and he will speak to that amendment; I may have something to add on it after he has spoken. Amendment 147A requires a judicial commissioner to authorise requests to obtain data from internet connection records. As it happens, this is a very hot...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (3rd Day) (19 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: My Lords, I shall speak briefly on the amendments on the request filter. Along with internet connection records, the request filter is another power that first appeared in the draft Communications Data Bill and which died along with that ill-fated Bill. The view of the pre-legislative Joint Committee on that Bill, on which I sat, was that, “the Request Filter introduces new risks, most...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (2nd Day) (13 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: I fear that the Minister is taking himself down a long cul-de-sac here, because the implication of what he is saying is that no one may develop end-to-end encryption. One feature of end-to-end encryption is that the provider cannot break it; encryption is private between the users at both ends. He seems to be implying that providers can use only encryption which can be broken and therefore...

Investigatory Powers Bill - Committee (2nd Day) (13 Jul 2016)

Lord Strasburger: I thank the Minister for giving way. I think this is the first time I have heard the Government admit that the phrase “removal of electronic protection” does in fact refer to encryption. I want to emphasise—and anybody in the cryptography industry will spell this out—that you cannot have it both ways. Either encryption is secure, or it is not; it cannot be insecure for...


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