Results 141–160 of 440 for speaker:Mr Derek Spencer

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (27 Jun 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The hon. Gentleman will be pleased to know that the criteria that the Crown Prosecution Service applies in deciding whether to bring cases are clearly set out in the revised code, and I hope that the effect of the clarified criteria will lead to more prosecutions. In fact, the discontinuance rate, to which he referred, has fallen in the past year from 13.5 to 12.9 per cent. in the magistrates...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (27 Jun 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: I willingly do that. As well as being written in plain English, the code is written in plain Welsh.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (27 Jun 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The facts do not justify that complaint. If one analyses the more serious cases that are dealt with in the Crown courts, one sees that the indictable-only cases component—that is what the right hon. and learned Gentleman and I, in the trade, call heavy cases—has gone up from 18 per cent. of completed cases in 1991–92 to 21 per cent. in the past year.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (27 Jun 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The police referred the file to the Crown Prosecution Service which, applying the criteria which applies to all cases, decided that it was a proper case to prosecute. Let me emphasise that, in this country, prosecutions are taken without reference to any political pressure or any hue and cry that might result after the case is brought. Police Constable Guscott struck the young man in hot...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service, Essex (23 May 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: I visited the Chelmsford branch of the Crown Prosecution Service on 23 February this year.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service, Essex (23 May 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: No visit to the Crown Prosecution Service is complete without a visit to the police administration support unit which serves it. The units ensure that files are properly prepared before the police submit them to the Crown Prosecution Service. When I was in Chelmsford, I found that there was excellent co-operation between administration support units and the CPS, including in the area to which...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service, Essex (23 May 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: When I went to Sheffield, I had a long talk with one of the senior Crown prosecutors, who is known to the hon. Gentleman. Like the Crown prosecutors at Chelmsford and Colchester, she made no such complaint.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service, Hereford and Worcester (23 May 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: My right hon. and learned Friend the Attorney-General last visited offices of the Crown Prosecution Service in the Severn-Thames area, of which Hereford and Worcester is a part, in November of last year and will be visiting another office in the same area next month.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service, Hereford and Worcester (23 May 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: My hon. Friend is quite right. Not only are discontinuances falling, but case loads are rising. The number of discontinuances fell from about 193,000 in 1992 to 175,000 last year. The number of cases received has risen in the magistrates court for the quarter ending March 1994 by 1.7 per cent. and in the Crown court by 2.4 per cent.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (23 May 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The main activity of the Crown Prosecution Service is the efficient and effective prosecution of criminal cases.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (23 May 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: My hon. Friend's advice is well given. We have set up a working group, which will be staffed by both police and senior CPS lawyers, to ensure that there is greater consistency of charges in assault cases. If my hon. Friend were to spend 15 minutes behind the desk of the custody suite at his local police station, he would see the circumstances in which the custody officer has to decide what is...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Ministerial Visits (25 Apr 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: My right hon. and learned Friend has no such plans.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Ministerial Visits (25 Apr 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The Department of Trade and Industry drew that question to the attention of the Serious Fraud Office at the beginning of its inquiry. Having considered all the issues, the SFO decided to focus its attention on the frauds that are at present before the court. I emphasise that the SFO—which is an independent prosecuting authority—made its decisions without reference to Ministers or to the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Ministerial Visits (25 Apr 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: I entirely agree with my hon. Friend. The trial was fixed for last autumn, and Mr. Nadir did not attend; we are anxious that he should make an early return and stand trial.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Ministerial Visits (25 Apr 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The hon. Gentleman must have been distracted: I answered that question a few moments ago.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Mr. Anthony Alliss (25 Apr 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: Two persons charged with the murder of Anthony Alliss were acquitted on the direction of the trial judge at Bristol Crown court on 24 June 1991. After causing extensive inquiries to be made into the conduct of the prosecution, I am entirely satisfied that it was conducted to a high standard.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Mr. Anthony Alliss (25 Apr 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: I congratulate my hon. Friend on the assiduous way in which he has pursued his constituent's interests in this case, but the trial was conducted by a High Court judge and the Crown was represented by a very experienced leader on the western circuit. After the judge had heard all the evidence, he concluded that it was not fit for the jury to consider. In a case of that sort, that is the end of...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Prosecutions (Victims' Interests) (21 Mar 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: When the Crown Prosecution Service is deciding whether to continue proceedings the interests of the victim are an important factor in determining the balance of the public interest.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Prosecutions (Victims' Interests) (21 Mar 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: My right hon. and learned Friend the Attorney-General has already called for the papers in that case and in another case in which the same judge sentenced the following day. My right hon. and learned Friend will receive advice from Treasury Counsel and will then make up his mind whether the sentences were unduly lenient. If he comes to that conclusion, he will refer the cases to the Court of...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Prosecutions (Victims' Interests) (21 Mar 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The hon. Gentleman will agree that that is one of the functions that the Court of Appeal carries out from time to time when my right hon. and learned Friend the Attorney-General refers sentences to it as unduly lenient. It also does that in other appropriate circumstances, as it sees fit.


<< < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Did you find what you were looking for?

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.