Results 121–140 of 440 for speaker:Mr Derek Spencer

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Asil Nadir (16 Jan 1995)

Mr Derek Spencer: As I have already said, we are very keen that Asil Nadir should come back to this country. He has nothing to fear, and we should be interested in what he has to say about the charges that have been preferred.

Orders of the Day — Crown Prosecution Service (12 Jan 1995)

Mr Derek Spencer: I congratulate the hon. Member for Crewe and Nantwich (Mrs. Dunwoody) on raising this important matter which gives me the opportunity, first, to set out in general terms the basis on which charges may from time to time be altered, and then to deal with the specific case that she raised. Justice is not blind. One can peer at virtually any statue of justice—in particular the one on top of...

Orders of the Day — Crown Prosecution Service (12 Jan 1995)

Mr Derek Spencer: I shall give way to the hon. Lady in a moment, but I would like to complete this stage of what I have to say because it might assist comprehension. At some appropriate stage, either immediately before a defendant pleads to the indictment or at the end of the Crown case, or at any stage prior to a jury returning its verdict, the prosecution may decide to accept some plea to a charge lesser...

Orders of the Day — Crown Prosecution Service (12 Jan 1995)

Mr Derek Spencer: The hon. Lady has a powerful crystal ball. I made a note of what I would say on that subject before I came into the Chamber: I wrote that the procedure adopted by the judge in this case was not unusual. It is with no disrespect to the officials who briefed me that I tell the hon. Lady that I do not need to ask them whether the procedure was unusual; having spent more than 30 years in the...

Orders of the Day — Crown Prosecution Service (12 Jan 1995)

Mr Derek Spencer: I fear that the hon. Lady is quite wrong about that. I have told her that there was virtually nothing more to be heard because Card did not intend to go into the witness box. When the judge sentenced the two defendants he set out most clearly, as prosecuting counsel had done when he accepted the pleas, the basis upon which he was sentencing them. First, he said that the two defendants had...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (5 Dec 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The Crown Prosecution Service and the police continue to work together closely. A number of initiatives include a pilot scheme in which Crown Prosecution Service lawyers will hold regular advice surgeries for police officers.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (5 Dec 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: I can assure my hon. Friend of that. I also had the benefit of visiting the CPS in Leicester. As my hon. Friend discovered, good communication lies at the heart of sound prosecuting. With that much in mind, the police and the CPS are taking forward joint monitoring of their performance nationally and have developed national charging standards for a variety of assaults, ranging from common...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (5 Dec 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: Not for the first time, the right hon. and learned Gentleman is being wise after the event. It is easy to speak with the benefit of hindsight. The case was taken in front of an experienced metropolitan magistrate. It lasted for about 11 days, during which time there was a thorough preliminary inquiry. The magistrate ruled that there was a case to answer. The case was also advised on by senior...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Lenient Sentences (5 Dec 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: During the past 12 months, the Attorney-General sought leave to refer 50 cases to the Court of Appeal. Of the 38 cases decided to date, 32, or 84 per cent., have resulted in an increase in sentence.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Lenient Sentences (5 Dec 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: My hon. Friend may find on closer analysis that, in that sector, as in so many others, the Labour party has changed its ground somewhat over the past two or three years. The Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994 will give my right hon. and learned Friend the Home Secretary power to extend the scope of the present power to refer to serious fraud. I understand from him that he will be...

Orders of the Day — Drug Trafficking Bill [Lords] (31 Oct 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The only issue before the House is whether the existing law should be consolidated in the Bill or left as it is, in a number of different statutes. I did not hear the hon. Member for Brent, South (Mr. Boateng) suggest that, but if he were to have his way and not approve the consolidation, we would be left with the Criminal Justice Act 1988, Criminal Justice Act 1993, Criminal Justice...

Orders of the Day — Drug Trafficking Bill [Lords] (31 Oct 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: I am aware of the contrary position in my constituency of Brighton, Pavilion, where there is a very active drug prevention unit. In other parts of the country, where they are necessary, there are similar units.

Orders of the Day — Drug Trafficking Bill [Lords] (31 Oct 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: I beg to move, That the Bill be now read a Second time. This is a pure consolidation measure.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: May Inquiry (18 Jul 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The total reported costs at 7 July 1994 were £2,150,000.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: May Inquiry (18 Jul 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: Opposition Members were quick to adopt Sir John May's findings in the Maguire inquiry when it suited their book. Now that it does not, they sing a different tune.

Orders of the Day — Value Added Tax Bill [Lords] (4 Jul 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: That would be a point of order for the Chair, not a matter for me.

Orders of the Day — Value Added Tax Bill [Lords] (4 Jul 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: I beg to move, That the Bill be now read a Second time. This, too, is purely a consolidation of the enactments relating to value added tax that are now found in the Value Added Tax Act 1983 and a number of subsequent Finance Acts.

Orders of the Day — Vehicle Excise and Registration Bill [Lords] (4 Jul 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: I beg to move, That the Bill be now read a Second time. The Bill is the first of two consolidation Bills before the House tonight. It was produced by the draftsmen of the Law Commission and consolidates the enactments relating to vehicle excise duty and the registration of vehicles. There is a need for consolidation because provision about the subject has been made by numerous Finance Acts...

Orders of the Day — Vehicle Excise and Registration Bill [Lords] (4 Jul 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: As the House knows, this is a consolidation Bill. The Joint Committee on Consolidation Bills certified that it was purely a matter of consolidation and did not change the existing law. The point raised by my hon. Friend the Member for Northampton, North (Mr. Marlow) is not a matter relating to the consolidation Bill, but out of courtesy to him I shall pass on his comments to my right hon....

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (27 Jun 1994)

Mr Derek Spencer: The Crown Prosecution Service dealt with 1,454,239 cases in the magistrates court and 114,521 cases in the Crown court in the past year, and is responsible for conducting prosecutions fairly, effectively and efficiently.


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