Results 181–200 of 440 for speaker:Mr Derek Spencer

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Bail (29 Nov 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: I can reassure my hon. Friend. The Crown Prosecution Service already gives very high priority to the interests of victims. At present, the police inform the CPS if there is a risk that the victim will suffer further offences or be intimidated by the defendant. If so, the CPS objects to bail on the grounds set out in the Bail Act 1976. We intend to go further, however. On 9 November, my right...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Bail (29 Nov 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: The question whether Mr. Levitt should be granted bail was exclusively a matter for the court, and the question of what sentence should be imposed was a matter exclusively for Mr. Justice Laws, who passed sentence. Those were not matters for the Serious Fraud Office, and not matters for the prosecution at all. The hon. Gentleman should be aware that the charge on which Mr. Levitt was tried...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Bail (29 Nov 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: My hon. Friend will be pleased to hear that we are abreast of his thinking. The Bail (Amendment) Act 1993, which will come into operation in January, gives the prosecution a right to appeal to the Crown court against the granting of bail in most important cases in the magistrates court. My right hon. and learned Friend the Home Secretary has recently announced further proposals under which...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: London Borough of Bromley (12 Jul 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: An initial report concerning the social services Department was received on 17 October 1991. Following further police investigations, an additional lengthy report was submitted on 20 May 1993. Meanwhile a report concerning the environmental health department was received in February this year. Police inquiries continue and decisions on prosecution will be made as soon as possible.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: London Borough of Bromley (12 Jul 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: The hon. Gentleman is quite right that all cases ought to proceed with expedition. Where there are allegations of fraud and corruption, as in this case, it is doubly important that they are investigated rigorously. It is not unusual for such fraud to be carried out in a secretive way by those involved, and, for that reason, the police sometimes find that it takes a considerable time to...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: London Borough of Bromley (12 Jul 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: A number of inquiries are being held up and down the country into local government dishonesty and fraud. There are two cases of alleged fraud in the Bolsover district council, in which one defendant has already been convicted and the other has been tried and a retrial of his case is awaited.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Lenient Sentences (12 Jul 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: In the 12 months to 30 June 1993, the Attorney-General applied to the Court of Appeal for leave to refer 33 sentences for review, including five in Northern Ireland. Of the 19 references so far determined by the court, 16 have resulted in an increased sentence.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Lenient Sentences (12 Jul 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: That power is now widely accepted as important and necessary and we often see it referred to by judges in their sentencing remarks. I shall resist the temptation that my hon. Friend has extended to me but, on Second Reading in 1988, an Opposition Member described that power as "sheer cruelty". He appears to have a poor memory because, only a short time ago, he wrote to my right hon. and...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Prosecutions (21 Jun 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: When the Crown Prosecution Service is deciding whether to continue proceedings, the interests of the victim are an important factor in determining the balance of the public interest.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Prosecutions (21 Jun 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: The Government are strongly committed to helping victims of crime. As my hon. Friend will know, the Government published their victims charter in 1990. Although it is a matter for the Home Office, I can tell my hon. Friend that funding for victim support has increased by 46 per cent. in the past two years, from £5·7 million to £8·4 million this year. On my hon. Friend's more specific...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Prosecutions (21 Jun 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: I understand what the hon. Lady says. We sympathise with those victims who feel that they are not kept abreast of developments in their cases. It is, principally, a matter for the police to inform victims of the progress of their cases. It is not every victim who requires financial support, but the hon. Lady will be aware of the change that we made to the law in 1988, as a result of which, in...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Prosecutions (21 Jun 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: I always listen with interest to contributions from my hon. Friend on the subject of law and order, but I disagree with every statement of fact that he has just made. It is significant that one of the main ways in which the CPS is able to help victims results from a new form that it has introduced, which contains details of a victim's loss. That can be given to counsel in court to ensure that...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Prosecutions (24 May 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: Of the 1,433,858 cases finalised in the magistrates courts in 1992–93, excluding cases received for advice only and non-criminal proceedings, 70·5 per cent. proceeded to a trial or plea, 13·5 per cent. were discontinued, 8·2 per cent. were disposed of for other reasons, including failure to trace the defendant, and a further 7·8 per cent. were committed to the Crown court. Of the Crown...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Prosecutions (24 May 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: My hon. Friend will be aware that the Crown Prosecution Service was set up by the Prosecution of Offences Act 1985 as an independent prosecution service. It was given a new power under section 23 of the Act to discontinue proceedings and it does so without fear or favour. There is absolutely no reason or point in bringing to trial cases that will foreseeably fail. It is not in the interests...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Prosecutions (24 May 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: That is not a matter for any of the Law Officers. It does not fall within their responsibilities.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (24 May 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: The Crown Prosecution Service is an equal opportunities employer and recruits and promotes staff on merit regardless of race, gender or disability.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Crown Prosecution Service (24 May 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: My hon. Friend is right. The Crown Prosecution Service is led by an energetic, dedicated and articulate Director of Public Prosecutions who was selected in open competition and was awarded her post on merit. There are many initiatives to make a post more attractive to women. Over 60 per cent. of people in the Crown Prosecution Service are women. About 40 per cent. of its lawyers, including 33...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Information Technology (26 Apr 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: Information technology has been used in a number of factually complex fraud cases to speed up the presentation of evidence and to illustrate it in a clearer and more understandable form.

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Information Technology (26 Apr 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: Independent consultants who have been spoken to by the Crown prosecution service confirm that juries have found information technology of great assistance in following the details of cases. It has been used with success in the Barlow Clowes and Eagle Trust cases and it is currently being used in the Nissan prosecution. Its graphics are very good and it is good for showing invoice and payment...

Oral Answers to Questions — Attorney-General: Information Technology (26 Apr 1993)

Mr Derek Spencer: Yes, information technology is used in out-of-court inquiries as well as in the presentation of evidence in court. When pursuing inquiries it is useful to bring together a wide range of information to see what factors there are in common.


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