Results 121–140 of 421 for speaker:Mr Ronald Brown

Middle East (28 Nov 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: I remind the Foreign Secretary and the House that the tabloid press in this country have a motto—"Make it simple; make it juicy; make it up." May I assure the Government that I was never hounded or imprisoned and that I have never been a prisoner of the Iraqis, although certain newspapers, such as the Daily Record, have suggested that that might be the case? Nevertheless, there are...

Oral Answers to Questions — Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs: Kuwait (28 Nov 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: Surely Saddam Hussein cannot be all that bad if he hates Thatcherism. As that lady has parted with her philosophy to stand in Dallas or elsewhere, might the House look at the issue more clearly? Saddam Hussein makes sense in some respects. he says that there must be dialogue, settlement and a peaceful solution to a very big problem. He says that, but, more important, the British community...

Oral Answers to Questions — Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs: Kuwait (28 Nov 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: It is important to people in this country and, more important, to people——

Local Government Finance (31 Oct 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: Surely the central point is that the Tory Government have been cheating on local councils for some time. Over the last 10 years about £10 billion has been cut from local budgets because state funding has been denied to many parts of England and Wales simply on the diktat of the Government. He will find resistance to the poll tax all over the country because many people cannot afford to pay...

Local Government Finance (31 Oct 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: Some 30,000 people were on the streets of London protesting against the poll tax. If that number were multiplied several million times, it would indicate the strength of opinion against the Government, their policies and the poll tax.

European Council (Rome) (30 Oct 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: Since today the Prime Minister is a great advocate of democracy, will she allow service men and service women the democratic right to join a trade union? If she agrees with that right, she will find that service men and service women in the Gulf would vote against war in that area because they believe in negotiation rather than confrontation.

Business of the House (18 Oct 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: May we have some time next week to discuss the role of Scottish Homes, a Government quango north of the border, as that body has refused to carry out basic essential repairs to properties in my constituency? Sir James Mellon, the chairman of Scottish Homes, is making all sorts of excuses for not carrying out that basic work on behalf of people who are paying high rents for properties that are...

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Transport Policy (17 Oct 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: If the Secretary of State does not miss the bus at the next general election but makes a journey to the centre of Leith, he will find tenants demanding repairs to their properties which Scottish Homes, under the chairmanship of Sir James Mellon, is refusing to do.

Prayers: The Gulf (7 Sep 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: Will the right hon. Gentleman give way?

Prayers: The Gulf (7 Sep 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: Will the right hon. Gentleman give way now?

Prayers: The Gulf (7 Sep 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: Will the right hon. Gentleman give way?

Prayers: The Gulf (7 Sep 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: The right hon. Gentleman is being selective.

Local Government Finance (Scotland) (25 Jul 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: As a lawyer, the governor-general will know that the poll tax, the so-called community charge, has doubtful legal status in Scotland. Why should anyone, irrespective of party, accept his edict, his Tory law? Plainly, many people do not and I support them. The mass non-payment campaign makes sense, and has forced his Government and his leader, the Prime Minister, to rethink the poll tax. They...

Oral Answers to Questions — Environment: Charge-capped Authorities (25 Jul 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: Surely it is understood that the community charge—[interruption]—that the poll tax is clearly unacceptable to people both north and south of the border. If they refuse to pay, is not it a clear indication of people voting with their feet and with their pockets? Does the Secretary of State agree that if hon. Members say that they are not paying, as I do, they are leading by example? That...

Civil List (24 Jul 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: We live in a democracy. Is not that the case? Who elected the royal family? I will answer that question for the Prime Minister: no one. Why should they get a penny, bearing in mind that they live in splendour while millions of people live in poverty, thanks to the policies of the Prime Minister and of the ruling class?

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Engagements (19 Jul 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: To ask the Prime Minister if she will list her official engagements for 19 July 1990.

Oral Answers to Questions — Prime Minister: Engagements (19 Jul 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: The Prime Minister's Government encourage state schools and hospitals to opt out. Those are spurious rights, of course, but what about Scotland? Is not it entitled to opt out of the system, too? Is not it entitled to its own Parliament, or is that extending democracy too far? If it is not, she should have a word with Mr. Gorbachev because he will argue for self-determination. He has said that...

Business of the House (12 Jul 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: Surely the burning question of the hour is the poll tax—the so-called community charge. Criticism of it as being unjust and oppressive have been directed at the Government, and clearly it is unacceptable throughout the country. It is certainly unacceptable north of the border, where, according to capitalist law, the poll tax should not be imposed. It comes back to the point that this House—

Business of the House (12 Jul 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: If hon. Members choose not to pay the poll tax, what force of law will be used against them? I am one of those who is not only refusing to pay but telling the working classes not to do so and to fight back. What will the Government do about that?

Points of Order (11 Jul 1990)

Mr Ronald Brown: On a point of order, Mr. Speaker. Will you, or someone else, explain why the official Front Bench spokesmen have remained silent on the issue? Surely that speaks volumes about the miscarriage of justice. They should come to the Dispatch Box to give the view, at least of the Labour party, about what is happening.


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