Results 181–200 of 6033 for speaker:Mr Paul Dean

Orders of the Day — Asylum Bill (13 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. The winding-up speeches are expected to start at 9.20. I hope that the three hon. Members who are seeking to catch my eye will agree to divide the time between them. That would give them about six minutes each.

Orders of the Day — Local Government Finance Bill (12 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: I have heard nothing from the Secretary of State which is out of order.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: The Economy (7 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: I call Mr. Gregory.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: The Economy (7 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: As I understand it, the hon. Lady is saying that there may have been a breach of privilege. If that is so, I recommend her to follow the normal course: to write to Mr. Speaker and inform him of the matter so that he can consider it.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: The Economy (7 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: That would be a matter for the House to consider, if the Committee reported to the House. If there is an allegation of a breach of privilege, the correct procedure is to write to Mr. Speaker.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: The Economy (7 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Is this on the same point?

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: The Economy (7 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. I will hear the hon. Lady, but I remind hon. Members that they are interrupting an important debate on the Loyal Address.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: The Economy (7 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: All I can say to the House is that, if it is alleged that there has been a leak from a Committee, there are well-established procedures for either the Committee or the House to deal with it, depending on the circumstances of the case. There is nothing more that I can say now.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: The Economy (7 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. We have had a very good run on this. From what has just been said, the matter may be automatically referred to the Privileges Committee. We cannot take the matter further now.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: The Economy (7 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. I said that I shall take no more points of order. An important debate has been interrupted——

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: The Economy (7 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. I have done all I can to assist the House and explain the automatic procedures in such cases.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: The Economy (7 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. Mr. Speaker announced at the beginning of the debate that it may be necessary to impose a 10-minute limit on speeches. In view of the current state of play, I am glad to inform the House that that will not now be necessary. However, if everyone is to be called, I appeal most strongly for speeches to last not longer than 15 minutes.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: Council Tax (6 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. Let me remind the hon. Gentleman that, unlike the earlier debates on the Queen's Speech, today's debate is on an amendment, to which the hon. Gentleman's remarks should be addressed.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: Council Tax (6 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: There is a distinction between the early days, when we debate the whole of the Queen's Speech, and days such as today, when we are addressing an amendment. Today's debate is more restricted than previous debates.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: Council Tax (6 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Let me repeat what I have said. In the early days, when no amendments have been selected, our debates are on the Queen's Speech, and any subject is therefore in order. Today, however, we are debating an amendment, to which the hon. Gentleman should address his remarks. The same will apply tomorrow if amendments are selected.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities (5 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. The winding-up speeches are expected at 9.20 pm. I hope that the three hon. Members who wish to speak will agree to divide the time between them.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities (5 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. I am obviously listening carefully to what the hon. Gentleman is saying, and I know that he feels strongly about the way in which he has been treated, but he is now getting close to casting aspersions on other hon. Members. If he intends to do so, can he assure me that he has given those hon. Members notice that he intended so to do?

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities (5 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. I am asking the hon. Gentleman whether he has given personal notice that he intended to make these remarks this evening.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities (5 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Then I must ask the hon. Gentleman to move on to other matters and to leave that one. He has had a good run on that point.

Orders of the Day — Debate on the Address: Rights, Freedoms and Responsibilities (5 Nov 1991)

Mr Paul Dean: Order. I ask the hon. Member to respect my judgment. He is now casting serious aspersions against other hon. Members. I am glad that he was frank with the Chair in admitting that he had not given notice of his intended remarks to the hon. Members concerned, and accordingly he must desist from that line of argument.


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