Results 1–20 of 6045 for speaker:Mr William Whitelaw

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Metropolis (Marches) (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I have no power to ban demonstrations. As to marches, the Public Order Act 1936 provides that the Commissioner of Police of the Metropolis or the Commissioner of the City police may, subject to my consent, make an order banning all marches or any class of march, but only if he believes that his other powers of control under the Act will be insufficient to prevent marches occasioning serious...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Metropolis (Marches) (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: My hon. Friend will appreciate that that does not come into the present law on serious public disorder. Those who decide to exercise their undoubted right to have marches or demonstrations must recognise the responsibilities that they are taking on and the danger that they will take away from others in the metropolis the police protection that they want.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Metropolis (Marches) (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I cannot give an answer to the first part of the hon. Gentleman's question without notice. If I were to send bills to all those who organised demonstrations, those bills would be considerable. —[Interruption.]—If the right hon. Gentleman would like me to send those bills, I should be pleased to do so.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Metropolis (Marches) (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I say again that those who decide to have marches and demonstrations, which is their democratic right, must accept their full responsibilities. In the Green Paper on public order I have made it clear that there are formidable problems, in principle and in practice, in suggestions about making conditions of control and in deciding to levy costs. However, we must look at the responsibility of...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Prison Population (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: On 29 April the prison population stood at 44,407, in addition to which 296 prisoners were held in police cells.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Prison Population (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I agree that that is unsatisfactory. As the hon. Gentleman knows, certain wings in some local prisons in London are out of action because we are undertaking improvements and maintenance which should have been carried out a long time ago. No one should suggest that that is wrong. I hope to propose measures that will put the matter right quickly. I have plans to make other places available so...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Prison Population (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: At long last we have a Government who have had the courage to take on the job and to build prisons. That must be right and be seen to be right.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Prison Population (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: In that article I referred to the use of non-custodial alternatives. The Government have done a great deal in that regard. Indeed, we have done a great deal more to build up the probation service than any of our predecessors. We have also done a good deal more to increase its numbers. The hon. Lady should remember that.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Prison Population (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: Yes. I am grateful for that important report, which should be studied. As I have made clear several times, the more public debate there is on what happens in our prisons, the more likely we are to deal with many of the problems that we have had for a long time and ignored at our peril.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Prison Population (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: The hon. Gentleman is right to say that those people should not go to prison, but the magistrates have a problem if someone persistently refuses to pay a fine. What else can they do with him?

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Police Interrogations (Tape Recordings) (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: The power in clause 51 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Bill which enables me, with the approval of Parliament, to make codes of practice extends to the tape recording of police interviews. The forthcoming field trials are designed to identify the basis for a national scheme and, therefore, to prove the scope and content of an appropriate code of practice.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Police Interrogations (Tape Recordings) (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: The principle of tape recording was set out by the Royal Commission on criminal procedure. The Government accept what was said and are pressing forward as fast as possible with the field trials. Everyone must accept that when we carry out the tape recording of interviews—we can and will do so under the Bill—we must do it on a sensible basis that will work. The purpose of the field trials...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Police Interrogations (Tape Recordings) (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: With his customary courtesy, the right hon. Gentleman asks me to struggle to remember something. I do not have to struggle to remember anything. The right hon. Gentleman asked me to struggle to remember what was said during our debates on the Police and Criminal Evidence Bill. I spent many more hours in the House listening to the debates on that Bill than did the right hon. Gentleman, and I...

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Police Interrogations (Tape Recordings) (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: The purpose of the field trials is to ensure that we get it right so that tape recording can be introduced on a proper basis.

Oral Answers to Questions — Home Department: Police Interrogations (Tape Recordings) (5 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: That has been one factor, but we have made as rapid a start as any Government could have made, and we shall press ahead with it as quickly as possible. That is the best guarantee that we can give that it will work.

Orders of the Day — Police and Criminal Evidence Bill (3 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: In proposing the motion I hoped that I was going at least some way towards meeting the proper anxieties expressed by the right hon. Member for Birmingham, Sparkbrook (Mr. Hattersley). I should point out to Opposition Members—I do not complain that they are making capital out of this—that it would have been possible for me to refuse to have anything to do with this procedure and to proceed...

Orders of the Day — Police and Criminal Evidence Bill (3 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I beg to move, That the Bill be recommitted to a Committee of the whole House in respect of Clauses 9 and 10 and New Clauses (Power of justice of the peace to authorise entry to search for evidence of serious arrestable offence), (Meaning of 'excluded material'), (Meaning of 'items subject to legal privilege'), (Meaning of 'personal records'), (Meaning of 'journalistic material'), (Meaning of...

New Clause 1: Police Officers Performing Duties of Higher Rank (3 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: We are prepared to accept the amendment.

New Clause 10: Constitution of Police Authority (3 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: First, I think that I should reply quickly to my hon. Friend the Member for Southend, East (Mr. Taylor). The hon. Member for York (Mr. Lyon) was correct: subsection (5) does merely repeat what is already in the Police Act 1964. Therefore, it would in no way affect my right to amalgamate forces, as my hon. Friend suggested. I know that my hon. Friend discussed the port of London police with...

New Clause 10: Constitution of Police Authority (3 May 1983)

Mr William Whitelaw: I maintain that influencing is the job of the police authority whereas controlling a law enforcement policy is not. That is the fundamental difference. Some hon. Members accept that, but then say that it would not mean that politicians would be intervening in the enforcement of the law in particular cases, because the independent prosecution system, which they also propose, and which I have...


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