Results 121–140 of 2476 for speaker:Mr William Brown

Orders of the Day — Courts Martial Procedure (23 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: Mr. W. J. Brown rose——

Orders of the Day — Courts Martial Procedure (23 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: I want to put this very direct question to the Minister if he will allow it. Was the Minister, then First Lord of the Admiralty, consulted in 1946 whether the Navy should be within or outwith the scope of the operations of the Lewis Committee and. if he was, what reply did he give?

Orders of the Day — COLONIAL NAVAL DEFENCE BILL [Lords] (22 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: "Let your light so shine before men."

Oral Answers to Questions — Food Supplies: Allocations (21 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: asked the Minister of Food what steps his Department takes to revise food allocations from time to time in respect of particular towns, in accordance with the growth or diminution of the population in those towns.

Orders of the Day — MILK (SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS) BILL [Lords] (21 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: And everything else too.

Orders of the Day — MILK (SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS) BILL [Lords] (21 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: To oppose this Bill is extremely difficult, but to support it with enthusiasm is just as difficult. One's attitude towards the Bill depends on what one wants to get. What this Bill sets out to get is clean pasteurised milk. What I want to get is something different; it is clean unpasteurised milk. For, while it may be true that pasteurisation destroys the bacillus of bovine tuberculosis, it...

Orders of the Day — MILK (SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS) BILL [Lords] (21 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: The cause of my recent loss of voice was sustained irritation at irrelevant interruptions from that side of the House. It is a fact that a child that will peak and pine on ordinary pasteurised milk, will, in a few weeks, flourish on ordinary cows' milk.

Orders of the Day — MILK (SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS) BILL [Lords] (21 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: I should like to pass from my afflictions to animal diseases. The experience of mothers in regard to their children is that there is all the difference in the world, from a nutritive point of view, between clean unpasteurised milk and clean pasteurised milk.

Orders of the Day — MILK (SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS) BILL [Lords] (21 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: If we are to conduct the argument on that level, I shall not address, myself to the hon. Gentleman opposite.

Orders of the Day — MILK (SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS) BILL [Lords] (21 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: It was not really necessary to interrupt me to point out the obvious. It is also true that scientific investigation can prove with certainty that we are well fed on the number of calories we are getting, but nobody feels like it? There is a profound difference between clean pasteurised milk and unclean pasteurised milk. What I want to get is clean unpasteurised milk, and we shall only get...

Orders of the Day — MILK (SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS) BILL [Lords] (21 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: I hope not.

Orders of the Day — MILK (SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS) BILL [Lords] (21 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: It is certainly true that if we had tried to feed all the American troops, on top of our own, there would have been a great shortage of milk, but that does not explain why it was made a military offence to drink English milk. It was an offence to buy it and to drink it because of the American view of the quality of our milk. That is a disgraceful situation. The right hon. Lady in her opening...

Orders of the Day — MILK (SPECIAL DESIGNATIONS) BILL [Lords] (21 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: I agree that if we can only get the sort of milk we are now getting, we must, if possible, prevent it from being tubercular, but the burden of my argument was that that was a temporary stopgap measure, and that the real problem is to get clean herds.

Oral Answers to Questions — Police Force: Housing Accommodation (17 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: Is the Home Secretary satisfied that he is getting the degree of priority that he ought to get from local authorities in this matter?—because it is a common experience that housing is a very important part of the difficulty.

Oral Answers to Questions — Police Force: Open Prisons (17 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: Is the Home Secretary satisfied that the staff at Leyhill is adequate?

Orders of the Day — Juries Bill: Clause 17. — (Abolition of Special Juries.) (14 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: I was very interested in the argument just advanced, and I should like to extend it a little further. If it be true that there are certain types of cases where a special jury—because its members are supposed to be better equipped with knowledge and experience than members of a common jury—are likely to be more adequate to deal with a particular case, we cannot stop there. There are many...

Orders of the Day — Juries Bill: Clause 17. — (Abolition of Special Juries.) (14 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: That may be, but the logic of the argument would ultimately lead us to the situation where we only had judges and no jury at all.

Orders of the Day — Juries Bill: Clause 17. — (Abolition of Special Juries.) (14 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: I beg the pardon of the hon. Member, but it is not the situation that we have now, otherwise this Debate would not be going on at all. I take the view that whether we have a common jury or a special jury we do not eliminate political prejudice. It is idle to suppose that a special juryman or a common juryman, when he goes into the jury box, immediately becomes com- pletely impersonal,...

Orders of the Day — Juries Bill: Clause 17. — (Abolition of Special Juries.) (14 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: No, I do not think that is true. It does not apply only to political cases. Our political outlook affects our outlook on every kind of thing. I think it was Cardinal Manning who once said that all human differences were ultimately religious ones. In other words, one's mental background in considering any question produces an effect. I cannot say that that is true in the case of the hon. and...

Orders of the Day — Juries Bill: Clause 17. — (Abolition of Special Juries.) (14 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: They were the most effective organisation of vested interest at the time, and like all vested interests, they brought pressure to bear in what they thought was the proper quarter. It has been broadened down now until this is the last anomaly left, and I think it ought to go. I hope we shall stand by the Government in this matter, and resist any effort to preserve a piece of legal mechanism...


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