Results 101–120 of 2476 for speaker:Mr William Brown

Orders of the Day — Superannuation Bill (9 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: I share the appreciation of hon. Members in all parts of the House of the very clear exposition of the Bill which we have had from the Financial Secretary this afternoon. It is an important Bill; it is a Bill which embodies a number of distinctively new features in Civil Service superannuation law and practice. In particular, at a later stage, I shall comment on the widows and dependants...

Orders of the Day — Superannuation Bill (9 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: Is that any reason why we should deny the opportunity of coming in to those who either have, or can somehow find, the money? I think the least that we can do is to give that option to the people who have got the money. I welcome the provision for retirement at an age earlier than the normal retiring age of 60. But I am one of those of whom the right hon. Gentleman above the Gangway spoke...

Orders of the Day — Superannuation Bill (9 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: No, we do not want that altogether, but the right hon. Gentleman himself is proposing in this Bill to take powers to dismiss them after the age of 50. I am suggesting that there are two wings to the problem. One is the wing of voluntary retirement, and the other is the wing of compulsory retirement, and both should be invoked. Any man who wishes to go from the public service after he has done...

Orders of the Day — Superannuation Bill (9 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: If I did, I should be completely out of Order. It does so happen that we are discussing a Bill dealing with public servants, and I cannot refer to anybody other than public servants without breaking the rules of Order. With regard to the question by the right hon. Member for the City of London (Mr. Assheton), I think that there is no fundamental solution for this except allowing a person to...

Orders of the Day — Superannuation Bill (9 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: I take it my hon. Friend is reflecting a political opinion and not casting a moral aspersion.

Oral Answers to Questions — National Finance: Books (Imports) (8 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: Is the right hon. Gentleman aware that the theme of this book, the point and pith of the book, consists in sudden revelations as a consequence of a long period of anterior delay? Since this has an important moral for the Conservative Party, will he give us an assurance that he will do nothing to impede its circulation?

Oral Answers to Questions — Germany: Eastern Europe (British Broadcasts) (7 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: Would it not save a great many Questions and a great waste of time if the Minister could give a comprehensive answer to the hon. Member for Finsbury (Mr. Platts-Mills) that he will never do anything of which either the British Communist Party or Moscow would disapprove?

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: Can the position arise if this Bill is passed?

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: After a Debate has lasted 3½ hours it may well be supposed that there is not very much fresh to say upon the issue before the House. But I think there is still something to be said, and I should like to express, as briefly and as cogently as I can, my own reactions to the Debate. It seems to me that there are three issues involved in our discussion. The first is, have we reached the present...

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: No, it has taken me threeand-a-half hours to get into the Debate today to deal with it.

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: I am saying that it has taken me three-and-a-half hours to get into the Debate today.

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: The Government must not seek to justify the whole range of decisions on the criterion of whether or not my party objected at the time.

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: I cannot give way again. What the hon. Gentleman means is that he is not satisfied with the answer. He has a perfect right to remain dissatisfied, just as I have every right to remain dissatisfied with the Bill that we are discussing. To return to the issue: Is this the right time to do it? I should have thought that it was about as wrong a time to do it as could possibly be considered. Here...

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: May I point out that that is the precise opposite to the argument used by the right hon. Gentleman.

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: In the first few words of the speech by the right hon. Gentleman he said that the King by Order in Council could use other methods than the methods prescribed in that Act.

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: Then why did the Minister revoke it?

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: What nonsense.

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: The Minister cannot complain that I did not give him advice two and a half years ago, considering the consistent and uniform way in which he rejects my advice about everything.

Orders of the Day — British North America Bill (2 Mar 1949)

Mr William Brown: And still the hon. Gentleman rejects it.

Orders of the Day — Courts Martial Procedure (23 Feb 1949)

Mr William Brown: This Debate is on the subject of the reform of courts martial procedure in the Forces. I have had very little to do with the Armed Forces, but I have spent a lifetime connected with the Civil Service, and the similarity between the Debate we are having now and the kind of answer I used to get from His Majesty's Treasury over and over again is too remarkable to be incidental. It was my...


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