Results 61–80 of 2476 for speaker:Mr William Brown

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 28. — (Extension of Relief on Compulsory Acquisitions.) (27 Jun 1949)

Mr William Brown: Except that in this case the State is the beneficiary under both heads. I cannot imagine that the Exchequer is entitled to charge the executors Death Duty on £1,000, which is paid to the State and subsequently for the State to pay only £250 in relation to that precise consideration. The right hon. and learned Gentleman would not rob the estate of £750 in that way, would he? Or would he?

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 28. — (Extension of Relief on Compulsory Acquisitions.) (27 Jun 1949)

Mr William Brown: Does the right hon. and learned Gentleman suppose that the State will give from the £300 million more than the claim which is advanced? I find that difficult to believe. Even if that were so would not the Government require from the estate additional Estate Duty in regard to the increased figure?

Oral Answers to Questions — Police Force: Oaksey Report (Findings) (23 Jun 1949)

Mr William Brown: Can the Under-Secretary tell us the effect of the report upon resignations from the Police Force and recruitment to the force since the new Oaksey concessions were announced?

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 4. — (Wines.) (22 Jun 1949)

Mr William Brown: Carry the cask back.

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 4. — (Wines.) (22 Jun 1949)

Mr William Brown: I find it rather difficult to follow the logic of some of the arguments which have been advanced today. I can understand the position of the hon. Member for West Ealing (Mr. J. Hudson). For many years he has been a strong and very effective attacker of the evils of drink, and he holds his point of view with such passionate sincerity that we always listen to him with great respect; but I...

Orders of the Day — Finance Bill: Clause 5. — (Sweets.) (22 Jun 1949)

Mr William Brown: After the next Adjournment Debate.

Orders of the Day — Superannuation Bill: Clause 40. — (Part-Time Service.) (31 May 1949)

Mr William Brown: I hope very much that when we come to Clause 38 the Government will either withdraw their proposed Amendment or that, if they do not, we shall soundly beat them in the Lobby. Suppose we do beat them in the Lobby on Clause 38, would the Government then agree that the Amendment which we are now asked to pass should be withdrawn and the terms of this Clause amended to conform with the terms of...

Orders of the Day — Superannuation Bill (31 May 1949)

Mr William Brown: I do not in the least want to make any party points about the Bill; indeed, I have no party for which to make them, and I do not pretend for a moment that the Bill as it stands has not substantial merits and attractions from the point of view of the Civil Service. Nevertheless, I want to appeal to the Chancellor not to press the Government Amendment but to accept the decision reached by the...

Orders of the Day — Superannuation Bill (31 May 1949)

Mr William Brown: It may be that we shall even go broke without the Government having remedied the sins of their predecessors. Is it not plain that we shall have a permanent canker of discontent on this matter if we do not put it right? The Chancellor makes the point, which is a fair one for him to make, and I do not complain about it, that if they are to put things right for people in every walk of life the...

Ireland Bill: Clause 1. — (Constitutional Provisions.) (16 May 1949)

Mr William Brown: I wish to state briefly the reasons why I shall go into the Government Lobby against this Amendment. In the first place, I approach this Amendment with a good deal of sympathy. Unless we can be reasonably sure that the Government of Northern Ireland represents a reasonable expression of the feelings of the Northern Irish people it would be taking upon ourselves a very great responsibility to...

Ireland Bill: Clause 1. — (Constitutional Provisions.) (16 May 1949)

Mr William Brown: That may be, but it would certainly have helped me, and I think others, if we had known what was in the mind of the hon. Member in relation to this matter. As the Amendment stands, it does not determine what constitutes the people nor does it provide whether it shall be the English or the Northern Ireland Parliament who would undertake the work of definition. If it should be the Northern...

Ireland Bill: Clause 1. — (Constitutional Provisions.) (16 May 1949)

Mr William Brown: No, I cannot give way.

Ireland Bill: Clause 1. — (Constitutional Provisions.) (16 May 1949)

Mr William Brown: I must say that whenever any Communists want to help me out of my troubles, I become very suspicious and I prefer to endure the troubles I know rather than fly to others that I know not of. I think, therefore, that this vague term "people" will not do. That does not absolve us from our responsibilities, but it means that we have to tackle these responsibilities, perhaps in a somewhat...

Oral Answers to Questions — "british Ally," Moscow (Publication) (4 May 1949)

Mr William Brown: Does the Minister contemplate any change in the title?

Oral Answers to Questions — Police Pay (Report) (28 Apr 1949)

Mr William Brown: In view of the fact that this Committee has been at work since last December, cannot the Under-Secretary give us some estimate as to when the Government will make up their minds on this matter and announce their decision to the House?

New Clause. — (Appointment of Consumers' Council and Committees.) (27 Apr 1949)

Mr William Brown: This Clause is ostensibly what I might describe as a mechanical Clause—a Clause which constructs a piece of machinery to do a certain job. But although it is a mechanical Clause, it does in fact raise a very deep issue of principle. That issue of principle is perhaps best illustrated by the exchange which took place between the hon. Members for Colne (Mr. S. Silverman) and Keighley (Mr....

New Clause. — (Appointment of Consumers' Council and Committees.) (27 Apr 1949)

Mr William Brown: Because I felt that the hon. Member hardly applied the Nelson touch, on this occasion at any rate, although he often does. It was his submission that if this Clause was ineffective in giving the consumer any real voice in the determination of price, quality, and what-not, we were no worse off, because the consumer had no effective measure of control or influence now. If we approach this...

New Clause. — (Appointment of Consumers' Council and Committees.) (27 Apr 1949)

Mr William Brown: Quite obviously, in a general argument I cannot go into every category of steel production. It may be that there are particular types of steel production in which, in effect, there is only one producer. Even if that be the case, in the industry as a whole there is a right of choice on the part of the consumer. Hon. Members opposite may well argue that that right of choice—or, to put it in...

New Clause. — (Appointment of Consumers' Council and Committees.) (27 Apr 1949)

Mr William Brown: Again I do not want to be diverted from my main argument. I only want to say that it seems to me that there is upon those who declare that the disadvantages of the freedom of choice are so great that that freedom of choice must be taken away—a very strong onus to devise some alternative and effective means. If we are to have an artificial substitute for the natural means, we must take steps...

New Clause. — (Appointment of Consumers' Council and Committees.) (27 Apr 1949)

Mr William Brown: It is perfectly true that the average housewife does not order tons of steel, but she does go around ordering an occasional 5 cwt. of coal. One would not expect the housewife to go to the consumers' council in the case of the steel industry in the same way as she would go to the consumers' council in the case of the coal industry. The point I am trying to make is that we cannot get her to go...


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