Results 161–180 of 320 for speaker:Mr Thomas Hubbard

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address (5 Nov 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: The noble Lady has anticipated me, because I was coming to that very point next. As a matter of fact, people of so-called professional status in this country have had more benefits from the deep thought of those who now sit on these benches than they ever had before. The status of teachers, doctors, nurses and others has been raised almost from starvation conditions as a result of the...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address (5 Nov 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: They may have been miners, but their conversation did not indicate that, because they asked, "Why are not the miners working?" If that is what is meant by collective effort, I am afraid that some of our people are beginning to believe that one section makes the effort and another section does the collecting. That is what percolates into the minds of our people when we hear of suggestions for...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address (5 Nov 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: There have been a great many questions in this House lately on the nationalised industries.

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address (5 Nov 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: Yes. They may not be questions on the day-to-day management of the nationalised industries, but that is another matter. There are people in Scotland and in the steel towns of England who remember the difference between the nationalised steel industry and the privately-owned steel industry. They remember when 70 out of every 100 in those steel towns became unemployed because it was decided to...

Oral Answers to Questions — Employment: Scotland (28 Oct 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: Is the Parliamentary Secretary aware that there is no such place in Fife which is pronounced as he pronounced Kirkcaldy?

Orders of the Day — Housing (Scotland) Bill: Clause 3. — (Schemes for the Provision, Otherwise than by Local Authorities, of Housing Accommodation for the Agricultural Population.) (16 Oct 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: It would appear from the speech of the hon. Member for Dumfries (Mr. N. Macpherson) that his inference is that hon. Members on this side of the Committee are not anxious to see agricultural workers properly housed. That is so far removed from the truth that I find it impossible to sit still and allow it to go unchallenged. Nobody suggests that agricultural workers should not be properly...

Housing (Scotland) Bill: Clause 1. — (Increase of Exchequer and Local Authorities' Contributions in Respect of Housing Accommodation Provided by Local Authorities.) (15 Oct 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: I think it would be very bad indeed if we passed this Clause without a further word being said about the basic subsidies mentioned in it. I am very glad indeed that during the Second Reading debate I complained that the rise in costs was approaching a stage at which it would be almost impossible for the lower-paid wage earners even to consider accepting a house; and at the same time I...

Industry in Scotland (10 Jul 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: Is the hon. Gentleman not aware that already the Government have placed contracts with Northern Ireland that cannot be undertaken, while at the same time there are many textile factories in Scotland bursting for such orders? Will he look into that point?

Industry in Scotland (10 Jul 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: The right hon. and gallant Gentleman will be asked to go up to the Official Reporters' room very shortly. Lieut.-Colonel Elliot: We are not supposed to be aware of the existence of anybody other than those who are on the Floor of the Chamber. Nearly all of those speeches have emphasised that we must not neglect the old existing industries of our country. That is very necessary just now. We...

Industry in Scotland (10 Jul 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: I do not wish to follow the right hon. and gallant Member for Kelvin-grove (Lieut.-Colonel Elliot), except to say that this debate on industry and employment in Scotland has assumed far greater importance than such a debate has ever done before. This question of employment is of vital interest to the people of Scotland. I find it very difficult indeed to understand the statements made by the...

Industry in Scotland (10 Jul 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: I hope the hon. and gallant Gentleman is not forgetting the fact that in those days, with which he is making the comparison, very little coal was being used in this country. The small size of our exports today is the measure of the amount of coal we have been using in this country. We have not the coal to export; surely that is the important thing. In those days, we were not using it in this...

Industry in Scotland (10 Jul 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: According to the figures they are higher.

Housing (Scotland) Bill (3 Jul 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: Unlike the hon. Member for Angus, North and Mearns (Mr. Thornton-Kemsley), I have sat here throughout the whole of this debate, but like the right hon. and gallant Gentleman the Member for Kelvingrove (Lieut.-Colonel Elliot), I had made up my mind not to take part in the debate, athough it is very difficult to remain in one's seat during a housing debate, particularly on Second Reading. We...

Housing (Scotland) Bill (3 Jul 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: We have heard a great deal about the negotiations with the local authorities. I hope that they were conducted on a much better tempered plane than this debate.

Housing (Scotland) Bill (3 Jul 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: We are to be ruled by England?

National Health Service (Charges) (2 Jul 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: I thought that tonight we were dealing on this Prayer with an issue which would be a cause neither of great controversy nor of the hilarity such as we heard during the speech of my hon. Friend the Member for Wolverhampton, North-East (Mr. Baird). The section of the community with which these Regulations deal consists of people who, because of the very nature of their illness, are the...

National Health Service (Charges) (2 Jul 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: I do not think that anyone is suffering from that complaint today. I suggest seriously to the Minister and to the Government that if they really have an interest in the health of the people of the country, not only now but in the generation to come, the ability to keep healthy must not be tied to the ability to pay. If we are to overcome our economic difficulties we can only do so if we have...

Second Schedule. — (Amendments of Benefit Provisions of Industrial Injuries Act.) (29 May 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: I do not wish to be in any way ungenerous to the Minister—indeed, I am very happy that this Bill has been brought to its present stage at this time—but I would remind the hon. Member for Barry (Mr. Gower) that it not only provides for increased benefits, but also for increased payments, and that when we speak in terms of money approximately only one-seventh of the sum involved will be a...

Second Schedule. — (Amendments of Benefit Provisions of Industrial Injuries Act.) (29 May 1952)

Mr Thomas Hubbard: I thought I mentioned those who are permanently unable to earn their livelihood and those who through sickness cannot do part-time work. There should be a differentiation between those unable to earn any additional income and those who might be able to take up a part-time occupation.


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