Results 1–20 of 624 for speaker:Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: Will the hon. and learned Gentleman say from what conditions in the 'twenties and 'thirties the Socialist Party rescued agriculture? I do not remember that it helped much over the Corn Production Act.

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: Sir R. Clarke rose—

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: I entirely agree with most of what was said by the hon. Member for Chorley (Mr. Kenyon) particularly with regard to pigs and the Fatstock Marketing Corporation, and smallholdings. People should consider carefully before they take a smallholding and should regard it generally only as a step towards something greater. I disagree, however, with the statement of the hon. Member that the...

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: I do not know how far back the right hon. Gentleman was going in making that statement, but he should remember that the Conservative Party was out of office for 16 years before coming into power and forming the policy upon which it is acting now. A Government, predominantly Conservative, in which the right hon. Gentleman played a very honourable part produced an enormous change in British...

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: They never had the chance, they were nationalised.

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: The right hon. Gentleman will remember that the business agreement was drawn up only in the year before nationalisation. The question of rents raised by the hon. Member for Leek was answered by my hon. Friend the Member for Westmorland (Mr. Vane). The level of British farm rents quoted was grossly exaggerated, and to clarify the picture I would say that whatever are the rents it is a fact...

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: The right hon. Gentleman says that because the Labour Government went out of power they therefore could not do anything about them. I would point out that, with the exception of the Sugar Beet Industry Bill in 1925, the Labour Party certainly did not vote for any of the later Marketing Acts and, in fact, divided against them in nearly every case. We did not vote against the 1947 Act.

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: We voted against it because it had no teeth. It was no use until some control of imports was introduced. Whichever party may be returned to power, I think that we are all agreed in our wish to do what we can for agriculture. The farmers most likely to be in need are what I might term the medium farmers. I mean the type of farmers who work on their farm themselves and who employ, say, two...

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: I was presuming that the farmer had given up. In many cases, if an older farmer were offered a house he would be quite ready to retire. Many of them hang on because they cannot find anywhere else to live. If the county agricultural executive committees offered them houses I think that they would be quite prepared to give up the leases of their farms and retire.

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: When he went out the farmer would receive a certain amount of money for the value of his holding. I am assuming that he is not a bankrupt. He could invest that money or buy an annuity. What do all old farmers live on?

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: I do not think that the right hon. Gentleman's objection would be an insuperable obstacle. My next point concerns the veterinary service. Here again wonderful advances have been made but I wonder if we are travelling upon the right lines. The practical application, too, is very good. Wonderful cures of sick animals are achieved; many diseases are now avoided by inoculation and money is...

Agriculture (3 May 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: I would remind the hon. and gallant Gentleman of what everybody knows, namely, that it takes a farmer longer to go bankrupt than anybody else, owing to the nature of his business—and it is quite likely that some of these bankruptcies are a sort of delayed action from the activities of the previous Government.

Turco-Iraqi Pact (United Kingdom Accession) (4 Apr 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: The right hon. Member for Lewisham, South (Mr. H. Morrison) devoted a considerable part of his speech to Palestine. I hope also to refer to it, but I hope the right hon. Gentleman will not think I am discourteous if I wait until I reach the part of my speech where I wish to deal with Palestine and do net deal with it directly and at once. I should, perhaps, apologise for this incursion into a...

Turco-Iraqi Pact (United Kingdom Accession) (4 Apr 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: I have very considerable sympathy with Israel. I was in Lord Allenby's army. I cannot say that I took any real part in freeing Israel because I was wounded before I got there—but I started. At that time I thought we were writing the final chapter of an old tragedy, whereas, apparently, we were writing only the first chapter in a new volume of that tragedy. Nevertheless, I think it is a...

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Works: Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton (Memorial) (22 Mar 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: asked the Minister of Works when the memorial to Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton, which was removed from Parliament Square, will be re-erected and where.

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Works: Sir Thomas Fowell Buxton (Memorial) (22 Mar 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: While thanking my right hon. Friend for that reply, may I ask him whether he is aware that the Parliament Square Act stipulated that memorials which were removed should be restored, and that on at least three occasions his predecessors have said that this monument to the work of Buxton, Wilberforce and others who abolished slavery in the British Empire would be restored, and a place found for...

Oral Answers to Questions — Agriculture: Foxes (Damage) (10 Feb 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: Will my right hon. Friend bear in mind that, in addition to rabbits, the normal diet of foxes comprises a great number of other small animals such as rats, mice, voles, and moles, and that, in the absence of rabbits, the consumption by foxes of those animals increases, and that in that way they are doing the farmers a great deal of good?

Orders of the Day — Northern Ireland Bill (31 Jan 1955)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: So far, on this side of the House no one has spoken who does not represent a Northern Ireland constituency. I wish to express my full support for this Bill, and I hope that it will receive an unopposed Second Reading. I do so as one who has a very great admiration for the people of Northern Ireland, for their tough, progressive spirit and transcendent loyalty to this country, and also as one...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address (2 Dec 1954)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: I hope that the hon. Member for Derbyshire, South-East (Mr. Champion) will forgive me if I do not follow him in great detail over the many facets of his most interesting speech. I would say, however, that while all friends of the agricultural worker would agree that his wages and those of the town worker should be the same, the first thing to do is to persuade the town worker of that fact. He...

Orders of the Day — Queen's Speech: Debate on the Address (2 Dec 1954)

Colonel Sir Ralph Clarke: I am not certain that I heard what the hon. Member said, but I was suggesting that the young men and women who are coming on to the land are of an excellent type. They are extremely keen and are doing very well.


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