Results 181–200 of 2004 for speaker:Mr Nigel Fisher

Orders of the Day — Married Quarters (9 Mar 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I cannot give way further on this point.

Orders of the Day — Married Quarters (9 Mar 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I thank the right hon. Gentleman for that tribute. It is quite true. I want to deal with man-power more generally and the difficulties of voluntary recruiting, starting with the Regular Army. There is no doubt that the three-year engagement has been a tremendous success, but there is the imponderable aspect of who is going to stay on after the three years are over. Anyone on National Service...

Orders of the Day — Married Quarters (9 Mar 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I shall come to private enterprise in a moment. The same socks can be bought in a stores in the Strand, selling surplus equipment, at three pairs for 11s. 6d. These men say to themselves, "This is rather a lot. Are the Army trying to make money out of it?" Why is it that socks are more expensive in the Army than to the man who walks down the Strand to buy them? Not everyone can shop in the...

Orders of the Day — Married Quarters (9 Mar 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I would not cast doubt on what my hon. Friend says, but, as I anticipated such a rejoinder, I inspected the socks this morning and they were so similar that it was difficult to distinguish any difference between them at all. The quartermaster-sergeant who showed me the socks said he had worn both types and had noticed no difference. Perhaps we need not pursue the matter any further. Another...

Orders of the Day — Married Quarters (9 Mar 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I am most grateful to my hon. and gallant Friend for his confirmation of the importance of a gay uniform. The girls' preference for the Scotsmen may have had a different origin. Anyway, I hope that we shall be able to get away from this complaint of having the battledress for walking out, because I am sure it is bad for recruiting, and bad for morale. Just a word about the officers....

Orders of the Day — Married Quarters (9 Mar 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I know of some where there are no canteen facilities. Then there is the question of uniform upkeep allowances for officers. At £4 a year, it is not over-generous. It costs 10s. to have a battledress cleaned, and there are socks and boots to be replaced, and one cannot go far with £4 a year. The private soldier gets no uniform allowance, and his battledress has to last for four years. But,...

Orders of the Day — Married Quarters (9 Mar 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I went a little further than that. The hon. Member is advocating a paper scheme, but I went a little further, because there are disadvantages about a paper scheme when the crisis occurs.

Orders of the Day — Married Quarters (9 Mar 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: Mr. Fisherrose——

Orders of the Day — Married Quarters (9 Mar 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: The hon. Gentleman is advocating greater publicity for those who do not recognise the advantages of an Army career. Surely he would help that cause by acknowledging that Sandhurst is open to all and that it is not a question of privilege. Anybody can get into it.

General (14 Apr 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I know that the hon. and gallant Member for Brixton (Lieut.-Colonel Lipton), with his usual courtesy, will acquit me of discourtesy in not following his interesting argument, because I wish to detain the Committee for only a few minutes to say what a splendid Budget the Chancellor of the Exchequer has introduced. I am sure that it will get an extremely good Press and will deserve to do so. It...

National Service (Duration) (16 Nov 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I hope that the hon. Member for Leyton (Mr. Sorensen) to whose most eloquent and sincere peroration we have just listened, will forgive me for not interfering, as it were, in the internecine argument opposite on the principle of conscription generally. Instead, I wish to get back to the terms of the Motion and, in particular, to the words: … the time has now arrived when the period of...

National Service (Duration) (16 Nov 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: The Leader of the Opposition certainly endorsed it, and his endorsement was a great compliment to the efforts of the Prime Minister and the Foreign Secretary in their work. The question is whether, despite those efforts, the situation is sufficiently better to justify the terms of this Motion. Many of us on both sides of the House had great hopes of a genuine change in the Russian attitude...

National Service (Duration) (16 Nov 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: This attitude was supported from the hon. Gentleman's own Front Bench. I am merely arguing from the speech of the Leader of the Opposition. I am entitled to take up that point; but it does not alter the issue that there would still be the need for a strategic reserve here, which at the moment we lack, and for the need to defend Western Europe. I could not agree with the right hon. Gentleman...

National Service (Duration) (16 Nov 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: Why should we not bear the burden we believe necessary instead of having this business of a sort of Dutch auction going downwards. It is a nonsensical argument. If we believe in the policy we must do our best to implement it. As for the argument of the hon. Member for Dudley (Mr. Wigg) that seemed to represent a plea for conscription of perhaps three or four years. His arguments were not...

National Service (Duration) (16 Nov 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I do not think that it should be regarded as a permanency, but it is well known that the period is subject to review at any time by all the Service Departments, the Ministry of Defence and by the House of Commons itself. I now come to a matter which I regard as of great importance. It is the reaction abroad to any change, however small it may seem to be. The right hon. Gentleman the Member...

National Service (Duration) (16 Nov 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: It is not for us to suggest to the Australian sovereign Government how they should run their own affairs. Two wrongs do not make a right. What is the point of this Motion? Without it the position can be reviewed at any time by the Government and by the House.

National Service (Duration) (16 Nov 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I really do not see the point of putting the Motion down. Obviously a matter of this importance is always under review by the Government and indeed by the House of Commons. I do not want to enter into the realm of controversy, but I have been interrupted considerably. The question is why put the Motion on the Order Paper at all? I do not want to be uncharitable, but the explanation may be...

National Service (Duration) (16 Nov 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I am well aware that the debate arises out of the Order in Council which the Government have introduced.

National Service (Duration) (16 Nov 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: The Motion did not arise automatically; it was put down at the initiative of the Front Bench opposite. I hope very much that even now the Opposition will not press the matter to a Division. In dividing the House I am very much afraid that they may at least give the impression of dividing the nation too. This has been a national policy, above and beyond the party. We supported the Opposition...

Armed Forces (Housing Loans) Bill (23 Nov 1953)

Mr Nigel Fisher: I hope that the hon. Member for Newcastle-upon-Tyne, East (Mr. Blenkinsop) will forgive me if I do not follow him in his comparison between civilian and Service accommodation, although I appreciate that it is an important point. A main feature of the debate is that the Bill has been welcomed by both sides of the House. I am glad that even hon. Members below the Gangway who were arguing last...


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