Results 241–260 of 13444 for speaker:Mr Selwyn Lloyd

Orders of the Day — Industry (20 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. I wish the House would listen occasionally.

Orders of the Day — Industry (20 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. That point of order does not get off the ground at all. It is not a matter for me.

Orders of the Day — Industry (20 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. The hon. Gentleman has been a Member of the House for a long time, and he knows that, whatever else is a matter for the Chair, that is not.

Metropolitan Police (19 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: I certainly shall ensure that the hon. Member's point is drawn to the attention of those in authority, in the hope that the matter may be dealt with satisfactorily.

Queen's Speech (19 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: I have to acquaint the House that this House has this day attended Her Majesty in the House of Peers, and Her Majesty was pleased to make a Most Gracious Speech from the Throne to both Houses of Parliament, of which I have, for greater accuracy, obtained a copy, which is as follows: My Lords and Members of the House of Commons: My husband and I look forward with great pleasure to visiting...

Debate on the Address: First Day (19 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: I think it is the custom for an announcement to be made, early in the debate, about the topics to be dealt with each day. I understand that we are to have one day less this time, but I am not sure about it yet. I believe that I am authorised to say that today's debate is a general one and that tomorrow there will be a debate on industry. I shall make a further statement tomorrow, after...

Debate on the Address: First Day (19 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. It is not quite clear to whom the Prime Minister has given way.

Prayers (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: With the agreement of the House, and in accordance with present practice, I propose to call the First Deputy Chairman of Ways and Means to move together all nine of his motions for unopposed return.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. I hope that the House will quieten down. The Minister has made a statement and he is entitled to be questioned on that statement. [Interruption.] Order. I do not need any assistance in making my rulings. The Minister is entitled to be questioned, but there is no entitlement for speeches to be made. Perhaps the time will come next Session when speeches will be appropriate, but for the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Mrs. Shirley Williams—statement.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. This has nothing to do with me. The hon. Gentleman is allowed to raise only matters of order over which I have some control under the Standing Orders of the House. If the hon. Gentleman is putting a question to the Minister, it is no longer in order and it is not a point of order.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. This is intolerable. I must be allowed to listen to the hon. Gentleman.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. The hon. Gentleman must not rehash this morning's point of order. He was completely wrong. The amendment to which he referred was a Government amendment made in the House of Lords. It did not involve an additional charge. If the hon. Gentleman is good enough to read the Official Report, he will see how clearly that was stated. He was on a very bad point then. May I now hear the hon....

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. I understand the sincerity with which the hon. Gentleman makes this point. I fully realise the importance which he attaches to it. But it is not within my power to allow a debate on it today. This is a matter of argument on the substance. It has nothing to do with the rules of order. It may be a very important point, but it is not one for me.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. The hon. Gentleman has raised a perfectly—[Interruption.] Order. May we stop this shouting across the Chamber.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: I do not care who started it. The hon. Gentleman is continuing it. The hon. Member for Tottenham (Mr. Atkinson) is on a perfectly fair point. I think that it is unwise for the Chair to give too much advice too often. But if I were in the hon. Gentleman's place, I should make a great big row about his point as soon as the House meets again, which will be in a very short time. That is the time...

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: Order. I shall not allow that kind of reference to the other place. It has a long tradition. It exists with its present powers by virtue of an Act of Parliament passed by a Labour Government in my early days as a Member. It has those powers. Whether that is right or wrong is not a matter on which I should express an opinion, but I will not have that kind of expression used.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: If I had the power to introduce into this Chamber short, sharp Bills, many people might be very surprised. Mrs. Shirley Williams—statement.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: If the hon. Gentleman tries to catch my eye during the debate on the Address, he may or may not succeed.

Oral Answers to Questions — Trade Union and Labour Relations (Amendment) Bill (12 Nov 1975)

Mr Selwyn Lloyd: No doubt the Leader of the House will have heard that point. I do not think that this is an appropriate occasion for him to answer it.


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