Results 1–20 of 4947 for speaker:Mr Jack Lawson

Orders of the Day — North Atlantic Pact (18 Mar 1949)

Mr Jack Lawson: In view of what has been said by one Member from these benches, I think someone ought to say clearly that there is no doubt whatever that the people of this country will welcome the statement made today—[HON. MEMBERS: "Hear, hear."]—and not least the great Labour movement of this country. The people of this country have watched the progress of this matter and have heard of discussions...

Oral Answers to Questions — Leeward Islands: Governor (Consultation) (9 Feb 1949)

Mr Jack Lawson: Is my right hon. Friend aware that his attempts to get this matter put right through his Department are not receiving anything like the same notice in the Press as the rumours against the Governor?

Orders of the Day — Nationalisation (3 Nov 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: What was the number of men working when that output was reached?

Orders of the Day — Nationalisation (3 Nov 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: I am much obliged to the hon. and gallant Member for giving way, but is he aware that that was the very period when the men were defeated and when a great number of them were driven out of the industry, so that today about only three-quarters of that number are working in the industry as a result of the conflict at that time?

Orders of the Day — Nationalisation (3 Nov 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: Of the speech of the hon. Member for Bucklow (Mr. Shepherd) this, at least, can be said. It was worthy of the best days of the nineteenth century spirit of private enterprise. As the hon. Member spoke, I wondered what the right hon. Gentleman the Member for Bromley (Mr. H. Macmillan) was thinking. I remember when the benches on this side of the House used to be packed with Conservatives, and...

Orders of the Day — Nationalisation (3 Nov 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: It is true that after the First World War the coalowners brought the price of coal down, but there were great battles and strikes, and much bitterness, especially in 1920, 1921 and 1926. That situation would have prevailed today if the Conservatives had been sitting on these benches instead of Labour Members. There are one or two Members opposite, who know the industry, who will understand me...

Orders of the Day — Coal (24 Jun 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: Is the hon. Gentleman aware that, in quoting these figures for 1941, he has not said that the men were stripped down to very low wages, and that some thousands of the best men were driven out of the industry?

Orders of the Day — Coal (24 Jun 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: Do I gather that the scheme of provincial areas, which the hon. and gallant Member is putting forward, means dividing the country once more into export and home supply areas, with financial responsibility accordingly, which would also involve wages that follow the export drive, and the same old troubles?

Orders of the Day — Coal (24 Jun 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: Is not there a danger that that would precipitate a repetition of the old wages troubles that we had in the industry before the war?

Foreign Affairs (22 Jan 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: I have heard several speeches by my hon. Friend the Member for Gateshead (Mr. Zilliacus) in this House, and I have read several of his speeches. I am a political neighbour of his, a member of the same party and one who respects him very much. However, like my colleagues from the North, I have been very reluctant to take part in a Debate in which the differences would appear to be so pointed,...

Foreign Affairs (22 Jan 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: It may be that he speaks for some others in the party, but he does not speak for the majority of his party, nor does he speak for the working classes of this country.

Foreign Affairs (22 Jan 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: I think I know what the working class think as well as any man in this House.

Foreign Affairs (22 Jan 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: As a matter of fact, now that the question has been put, I lived among the working classes when I worked in the pits.

Foreign Affairs (22 Jan 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: I live in the same kind of house, in the same kind of street and among the same kind of people as when I worked in the pit, so I ought to know what they say. There are evidences in the North of England that there is not only dissatisfaction, but something amounting to indignation because the views put by the hon. Member for Gateshead are being interpreted as being something which represents...

Foreign Affairs (22 Jan 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: I knew my hon. Friend was going to put that point and he did get a vote of his divisional party

Foreign Affairs (22 Jan 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: However, I would remind him that since that time a very important miners' lodge has expressed indignation publicly about his views, and passed a resolution. I want to make quite clear the facts upon which the people base their views on Russia When this war ended I suppose none of the Allies was more popular than the Russians were with the great mass of our men, who saw them as very gallant...

Foreign Affairs (22 Jan 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: So it was. What are our people saying? Right and left, this is what they are saying. They are not super-intellectual in splitting hairs, but they see and hear what is taking place, and they are asking, "What do the Russians want?" My hon. Friend the Member for Gateshead has told us many things this evening, but he has not yet told us what they want.

Foreign Affairs (22 Jan 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: We should be very interested to hear it. The British worker and people do not understand what the Russians want, but what they do understand is that freedom is being killed in those States that border the Soviet Union.

Foreign Affairs (22 Jan 1948)

Mr Jack Lawson: They understand that, in those States, a Prime Minister can threaten with death those who oppose him. I am very pleased to have heard the statement made by the Foreign Secretary on behalf of the Government. I am glad that the Government are going to do their very best to build up an organisation. I am pleased that my right hon. Friend said kindly words about the Americans. In spite of their...

Services Personnel (Marriage Ban Removal) (1 Aug 1946)

Mr Jack Lawson: Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That gets me out of a difficulty. With the permission of the House I should like to make a short statement about the ban on marriages between British Servicemen and women of ex-enemy countries. I had arranged with the Speaker to make the statement yesterday, but, unfortunately, when the time came, I did not manage to catch his eye. After careful consideration the...


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>

Create an alert

Advanced search

Find this exact word or phrase

You can also do this from the main search box by putting exact words in quotes: like "cycling" or "hutton report"

By default, we show words related to your search term, like “cycle” and “cycles” in a search for cycling. Putting the word in quotes, like "cycling", will stop this.

Excluding these words

You can also do this from the main search box by putting a minus sign before words you don’t want: like hunting -fox

We also support a bunch of boolean search modifiers, like AND and NEAR, for precise searching.

Date range

to

You can give a start date, an end date, or both to restrict results to a particular date range. A missing end date implies the current date, and a missing start date implies the oldest date we have in the system. Dates can be entered in any format you wish, e.g. 3rd March 2007 or 17/10/1989

Person

Enter a name here to restrict results to contributions only by that person.

Section

Restrict results to a particular parliament or assembly that we cover (e.g. the Scottish Parliament), or a particular type of data within an institution, such as Commons Written Answers.

Column

If you know the actual Hansard column number of the information you are interested in (perhaps you’re looking up a paper reference), you can restrict results to that; you can also use column:123 in the main search box.