Results 41–60 of 915 for speaker:Mr Fred Blackburn

Sittings of the House (12 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: Both the hon. Gentleman and his right hon. Friend the Member for Kingston-upon-Thames have a misunderstanding about the reference to 12 o'clock. The Motion begins, a motion may be made after ten of the clock "— and the reference to midnight comes only because one has then to think in terms of the same day and not the following morning.

Sittings of the House (12 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: The hon. Gentleman could not have listened to my speech. I wonder whether he remains very often at the all-night ordeals.

Standing Order No. 2 (Exempted business) (12 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: Was it not 1951 and not 1954?

Standing Order No. 2 (Exempted business) (12 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: Everyone must recognise that the hon. Member for Crosby (Mr. Graham Page) is an expert on the question of Orders, but I do not think that he has made a very convincing case for the rejection of this Motion. I do not think that my right hon. Friend the First Secretary need worry particularly about debates on many Orders which could not be completed, even on affirmative Orders, in an hour and a...

Standing Order No. 2 (Exempted business) (12 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: I remind the right hon. and learned Gentleman that a Standing Committee would be formed by Members of Parliament.

Procedure: Standing Order No. 30 (Counting) (12 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: I beg to move, at the end add: Line 14, at end add:(3) The House shall not be counted during the proceedings on any Consolidated Fund Bill or Appropriation Bill, or during proceedings in the course of which Mr. Speaker is directed to put forthwith any question.(4) If at any time after four of the clock on the House being counted it shall appear that 40 Members are not present, the business...

Procedure: Standing Order No. 30 (Counting) (12 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: In the case of the Consolidated Fund Bill, surely the right hon. Gentleman would agree that it is only towards the end of the proceedings that there is likely to be less than a quorum, and, therefore, in the case of this Bill, and also the Appropriation Bills, the conditions may be different from those on other occasions?

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: I find that there is general agreement among hon. Members that we need some measure of reform. However, as soon as one makes specific proposals for reform, the opposition starts. There is no point in reforming the procedure of the House unless that reform means that we will conduct our business either more expeditiously or more efficiently. It is because I believe that by sending the Finance...

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: Yes. It reads: Any such change would admittedly give rise to a number of practical difficulties. Is that the passage the right hon. and learned Gentleman wanted?

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: That reads: It is virtually certain that a single Standing Committee will not be able to deal adequately with the Bill in the relatively short period available. Is that the part the right hon. and learned Gentleman wanted me to read?

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: I was calling attention to the paragraph I read only because of the sypathetic consideration the Leader of the House had given to my Amendment in the debate in 1959. I disagree with that part which the right hon. and learned Gentleman the Member for Wirral (Mr. Selwyn Lloyd) just now asked me to read. It was, I think, in 1965 that particular attention was once again called to the question...

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: Well, some hon. Members' health—there are only some hon. Members who make a point of staying when the House sits late. As one who sat until the early hours of this morning I have very much sympathy with another Motion, which will be discussed later. My hon. Friend the Member for South Ayrshire (Mr. Emrys Hughes), in his book "Parliament and Mumbo-Jumbo", has some very useful quotations on...

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: I heard the right hon. Gentleman, and the last thing I would do would be to call him a liar. But it is very relevant to know that when he occupied the important position of Leader of the House, and had to get Government business through, he was strongly in favour of sending the Bill to a Standing Committee. I would add—

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: I certainly withdraw anything I can withdraw, but what can I withdraw? I read out the fact that in 1962 the right hon. Gentleman was in favour of the Finance Bill going to a Standing Committee. I would add something more. I was a member of the Select Committee on Procedure, of which the right hon. Gentleman was Chairman. When I brought forward the suggestion of sending the Finance Bill to a...

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: I am afraid that the hon. Lady the Member for Hamilton (Mrs. Ewing) starts under a very severe misapprehension. She wants home rule for Scotland, but what she does not understand is that it is Scotland that has taken over England. It has been said that my right hon. Friend the Leader of the House is cracked. If he is cracked he is not the only Member—and I will not mention any names. When...

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: I do not know what the hon. Gentleman's definition of a threat is. To say that he intends to vote against the suspension of the rule if he does not get his own way seems to me to be very like a threat. Their speeches had little relevance to their Amendment. It seemed that the right hon. Member for Orkney and Shetland (Mr. Grimond) since a certain event took place in Hamilton has become more...

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: If I may interrupt my right hon. Friend, I remember one occasion when I was Chairman of a Standing Committee and the Committee was angry because the Home Secretary was not present and was not a member of the Committee. I had to rule that if the Committee wanted him to attend I would have to say that he could not come because he was not a Member of that Committee. This proposal would make it...

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: I do not know whether it is a case of chickens coming home to roost or, "If at first you don't succeed.…" But there are so many matters which we are discussing today which I have been advocating for many years. I raised the question of a timetable for Bills in the Select Committee on procedure in the 1955–59 Parliament. Hon. Members will find it on pages liv and lv. I am referring to it...

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: From the attitude of the right hon. Gentleman today, however, one wonders whether he even considers that to be a possibility. He must agree that the Amendment to line 6 is nonsense. Why place more responsibility on Mr. Speaker, who already has more than enough to do, by leaving it to him to decide if an agreement is working ineffectively? Mr. Speaker does not even sit in Committees upstairs....

Procedure: Standing Order No. 40 (Committal of Bills) (6 Dec 1967)

Mr Fred Blackburn: It depends on the man. The answer is "Yes" if it is a Labour Minister. He would be an impartial judge. The right hon. Gentleman wants to alter paragraph 1(b) to read: … any general agreement of which Mr. Speaker has been informed is, in the opinion of Mr. Speaker, working ineffectively. As Mr. Speaker is not sitting in the Committee, he is not likely to know. Although the right hon....


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