Results 1–20 of 3503 for speaker:Mr Eric Lubbock

Oral Answers to Questions — Power Stations (Fuelling) (27 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: Would not the right hon. Gentleman agree that where he has refused consent to the C.E.G.B. to convert from solid fuel firing to oil or natural gas, additional costs are imposed on electricity consumers? Bearing this in mind, does not the right hon. Gentleman think that the Coal Industry Act, 1967, and its successor, which is now in course of consideration, should be extended to enable him to...

Questions to Ministers (27 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: Further to that point of order, Mr. Speaker. Is it not clear that you are being put into a very difficult position indeed in that hon. Members are addressing points of order to you on something over which you have no jurisdiction? You have explained to the House on a number of occasions that you have no say in the selection of Questions to be grouped. Nevertheless, at least a dozen hon....

Clause 3: Evidence of Capacity, Consent etc., to Be Produced (24 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: It is amazing how little attention was given by the Standing Committee to any of the points raised on Second Reading. The Standing Committee proceedings occupied only six columns, only six of the hon. Members who were appointed to the Committee bothered to turn up, and the only hon. Member who spoke was the promoter of the Bill. I think that the Standing Committee is to be criticised for not...

Clause 3: Evidence of Capacity, Consent etc., to Be Produced (24 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: Certainly, Mr. Speaker, and I have done that on past occasions, but one has to approach somebody on the Committee, explain the meaning of the Amendment, get him to raise it, and so on. It involves a great deal of work in putting the case to the hon. Member who is to raise it. It is bad enough being on a Committee and trying to do it at first hand.

Clause 3: Evidence of Capacity, Consent etc., to Be Produced (24 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: I accept that, Mr. Speaker. I am only saying that it is far more difficult for an hon. Member to do it that way than it is if he is on the Committee himself. When he has explained it to the hon. Member who is to raise it there may be a misunderstanding, and the sense of the Amendment may not altogether fulfill his objectives. Because of the way the Bill is phrased, it is almost certain that...

Clause 3: Evidence of Capacity, Consent etc., to Be Produced (24 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: It is a question of who has to provide the evidence. If the patient had to say, " I am seriously ill and do not expect to recover ", or if the patient's assent had to be obtained to a statement of that kind, all the facts would be known to both parties entering into the marriage. The patient would be fully aware that he was suffering from a mortal illness. That was my point. If the evidence...

Clause 3: Evidence of Capacity, Consent etc., to Be Produced (24 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: I accept that. That is why I made my criticisms about the Standing Committee at the beginning. I regard this as a serious flaw in the Bill and think that it should have received adequate consideration upstairs. It is too late now, and we are having to do the best we can. Perhaps the noble Lords in another place will pay more attention to what was said in the Second Reading debate in this...

Clause 3: Evidence of Capacity, Consent etc., to Be Produced (24 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: I can certainly think of circumstances in which the well party would wish to have the marriage solemnised—for instance, to legitimise children—and would be able to persuade the patient in hospital not to defer the marriage until that patient was well, the patient assuming that he or she would recover but the well party knowing that the illness was a fatal one. That is possible; people...

Clause 3: Evidence of Capacity, Consent etc., to Be Produced (24 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: If we knew what was in the hon. and learned Member's mind about penalties it might help us to come to a decision about the offences that he suggests should be written into the Bill. I cannot argue with him about the logic of his case; it is just that I do not believe that we should create new offences and impose vast penalties in respect of them without careful thought.

Education Bill (22 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: On a point of order. I want to refer to a remark made by the hon. Member for Yeovil (Mr. Peyton). He maintained that members of the Government had been able to go to the Clerks for advice about the terms of the Motion, but that hon. Members on this side of the House had been denied like facilities. [HON. MEMBERS: " He did not say that"]. That was the implication of the hon. Member —[HON....

Oral Answers to Questions — Posts and Telecommunications: Rhodesian Postage Stamps (20 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: Has the right hon. Gentleman given consideration to the point that I raised with him in correspondence, namely, that the illegal regime is now getting round this ban by marking correspondence and propaganda sent to hon. Members—and no doubt many other citizens in the United Kingdom—" Official Paid "? What steps is the right hon. Gentleman taking to prevent this practice spreading?

Future of the Sixpence (20 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: Does not the right hon. Gentleman agree that the report was a complete waste of time and energy? How much did it cost? Every argument that he has put forward in his statement today would have been equally valid without the report. Why did the Government not take the advice given by hon. Members at the time of the passage of the Decimal Currency Act and thus save a great deal of anxiety?

Business of the House (16 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: Does the right hon. Gentleman recall that last week when I asked him about the Report from the Select Committee on the Declaration of Members' Interests he gave me a very sympathetic reply and said that the matter could be debated in the near future? Has he come to any conclusion? Will he at least give us an assurance that it will be debated before the Whitsun Recess?

Business of the House (9 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: Would the right hon. Gentleman remind the House how long it is since the report of the Select Committee dealing with the declaration of Members' interests was published, and say how much longer we are to wait for a debate?

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry Bill (9 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: If the right hon. Gentleman has refused consent to the C.E.G.B. to permit the conversion of Tilbury "B" power station or any other power station from coal to oil, will they qualify for assistance given for the burning of coal under the Bill or not?

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry Bill (9 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: It may even be more than that.

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry Bill (9 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: Is the hon. and gallant Gentleman telling the House that in the period covered by the Bill the National Coal Board told his Committee that it expected a reduction of 10 per cent. in its labour force in each of those years?

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry Bill (9 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: Why did not the hon. Gentleman take the matter up with the Press Council?

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry Bill (9 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: I begin by adding my congratulations to those which have been expressed to the hon. Member for South Ayrshire (Mr. Sillar), who made an extremely good maiden speech. It was a pleasure to listen to him, because, clearly, he is extremely knowledgeable about the coal industry. I say genuinely what people often say as a matter of form: we shall look forward eagerly to hearing him in future...

Orders of the Day — Coal Industry Bill (9 Apr 1970)

Mr Eric Lubbock: As the right hon. Gentleman says, he can get enormous grants on his capital equipment. So the inducements are there, but, unfortunately, industry is not always ready to take advantage of them. In some development areas where mining is declining, there are advance factories which have been empty for up to 18 months or two years. I hope that the Ministry will give some thought to my...


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