Results 1–20 of 2921 for speaker:Mr Russell Johnston

Oral Answers to Questions — Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs: Hong Kong (12 Mar 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: Did the Foreign Secretary have an amicable meeting? If he were an independent-minded journalist in Hong Kong, would he feel confident after that meeting that he would be able to pursue his trade unfettered after the handover?

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Public Responsibility For Social Justice (10 Mar 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: The hon. Gentleman is being very kind, but he is speaking as if I was about to be borne out of here and buried.

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Public Responsibility For Social Justice (10 Mar 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: I welcome the way in which the hon. Member for Moray (Mrs. Ewing) introduced the debate. I shall try to follow the path that she set. Social justice and the problem of poverty are proper subjects for serious debate, focusing attention not only on specific policies, but, as she tried to do, on the principles and attitudes that animate the main political forces in Scotland and Wales, throughout...

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Public Responsibility For Social Justice (10 Mar 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: One moment. I should like to finish this point, then I shall give way. The social protection that led those countries to devise the social chapter of the Maastricht treaty is openly rejected by Conservatives. The Secretary of State did so this afternoon. I find that the most bizarre political stance that I have ever witnessed from a party.

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Public Responsibility For Social Justice (10 Mar 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: I can see the hon. Gentleman. He does not need to flap his hands all the time. I shall give way to him in a minute. It seems odd for a party that has had responsibility for government for 18 years to try to get votes by going around saying, "The great thing about us is that we are going to reduce social protection for you."

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Public Responsibility For Social Justice (10 Mar 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: With great respect to the hon. Gentleman—with effort—I do not accept what he says. That factor has been taken into account. I find it a matter for shame to be told that my country is the most unequal in the west. It should be a matter for shame for the Government that their 18 years of uninterrupted, unfettered power have produced such inequality. One of the affirmations of the 1947...

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Public Responsibility For Social Justice (10 Mar 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: I am grateful to my hon. and learned Friend, whose sharp legal brain seizes the right words so solicitously. Professor Galbraith said: There is a further matter on which liberals take an adverse view of current ideological fashion"— it is still current for the Secretary of State— As always, we seek an economic world in which all can participate and from which all have a decent return. We...

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Public Responsibility For Social Justice (10 Mar 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: The hon. Gentleman is skirting around my point. I said that it was unfair of the Secretary of State for Scotland—it is not unusual for him to be unfair—to compare our employment position with that of Germany, given that Germany had just managed to absorb into its economy 17 million people who are economically backward. I said that we could not have done that, and that is perfectly true....

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Public Responsibility For Social Justice (10 Mar 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: The right hon. Gentleman has referred to German unemployment. How does he think this country would have managed if it had had to absorb a country of 17 million people with a rotten economic system?

Orders of the Day — Opposition Day: Public Responsibility For Social Justice (10 Mar 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: I am not trying to argue with the hon. Lady, but she said that there were 75,000 homeless in Scotland. I thought that the Shelter figure for last year was 31,000. Whom does her figure cover?

Jurisdiction (Conspiracy and Incitement) Bill: Conspiracy to Commit Offences Outside the United Kingdom (14 Feb 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: I had not intended to speak in the debate, but feel that I should make a brief contribution. It seems clear that the general intention of the Bill is laudable, certainly within the area of criminality—the area of political activism is much more problematic. What I have heard loud and clear, however, is that the Bill is cast in an unsatisfactory way. The amendments proposed by the hon....

Jurisdiction (Conspiracy and Incitement) Bill: Conspiracy to Commit Offences Outside the United Kingdom (14 Feb 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: I agree with everything that the hon. Member for Cardiff, South and Penarth (Mr. Michael) has said. However, in my long years in the House, one thing that I have learnt is that Ministers' assurances that Parliament's intentions are this, that or the other become worthless after a Bill becomes law.

Jurisdiction (Conspiracy and Incitement) Bill: Conspiracy to Commit Offences Outside the United Kingdom (14 Feb 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: I have been following the hon. Gentleman's speech with great interest as I am not really conversant with the Bill, but he has now said, "The amendment does not go far enough" four times. I get the feeling that no amendment would go far enough.

Jurisdiction (Conspiracy and Incitement) Bill: Conspiracy to Commit Offences Outside the United Kingdom (14 Feb 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: I was not intending to make a joke. It simply seemed to me that the hon. Gentleman was advancing arguments that in substance are against the whole idea of having such a Bill at all.

St. Helena (22 Jan 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: I shall follow up some of the points that the hon. Member for North-West Hampshire (Sir D. Mitchell) made, in a constructive speech. It was a pleasure to listen to the speech of the hon. Member for Sevenoaks (Mr. Wolfson). I congratulate him, as others have done, on raising the situation in St. Helena. His descriptions were as fascinating as his arguments were persuasive. Unlike him, I have...

St. Helena (22 Jan 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: That is a fair point. Of course, if resources are limited and the number of people using the transport mode is limited, one may have to decide between one and the other. I agree with the hon. Gentleman. Certainly, everyone seems to be saying that the improvement of landing facilities is of pre-eminent importance. It was bad to hear the hon. Member for North-West Hampshire say that five cruise...

St. Helena (22 Jan 1997)

Mr Russell Johnston: How big is the ship, how many passengers can it accommodate and what contribution would it make to the development of tourism?

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Homelessness (18 Dec 1996)

Mr Russell Johnston: To ask the Secretary of State for Scotland what progress is being made in introducing a rough sleepers initiative in Scotland; and if he will make a statement. [8141]

Oral Answers to Questions — Scotland: Homelessness (18 Dec 1996)

Mr Russell Johnston: The Minister knows that my question was tabled before the statement was made. Following the variety of questions on housing, has the Minister seen the latest Shelter estimate that the housing waiting list in Scotland is now longer, at 194,579, than it has ever been? Is that not a dreadful comment at the end of 17 years of Tory government?

Unfunded Pension Liabilities (European Union) (11 Dec 1996)

Mr Russell Johnston: In a way, the only surprising aspect of the Select Committee's report, which caused a considerable stooshie, is that it has come late to the subject. The hon. Member for Dover (Mr. Shaw) remarked in his speech that he raised the matter in 1991 and my noble friend Lord Taverne was the rapporteur for the Federal Trust on a pamphlet entitled "The Pension Time Bomb in Europe" two years ago. So...


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