Results 1–20 of 1284 for speaker:Mr Aubrey Jones

Bill Presented: Defence (3 Mar 1965)

Mr Aubrey Jones: It would be indelicate of me, at the beginning of my speech, to add to the discord which exists between the hon. and learned Member for Northampton (Mr. Paget) and his Front Bench on the nuclear question. I will give later my reasons for the apparent similarity between the posture adopted by the present Government and that adopted by their predecessors. They are more subtle and intractable...

Bill Presented: Defence (3 Mar 1965)

Mr Aubrey Jones: I regard the defence of the West as a worldwide problem. What I am suggesting is that in attempting to discharge our responsibilities east of Suez we must strengthen our European base. Unless we do that, we shall be less able to discharge our east of Suez responsibilities. So much for the conventional side. I should now like to come to the question of the deterrent. As I see it, as a result...

Bill Presented: Defence (3 Mar 1965)

Mr Aubrey Jones: We have, of course, an obligation to defend Malaysia. All I say is that that is an interest not only of this country but of the United States and indeed of the whole of N.A.T.O. A question which the hon. and learned Member for Northampton did not answer, but which my right hon. Friend the Member for Monmouth (Mr. Thorneycroft) touched upon, and one to which the House should address itself,...

Orders of the Day — Schedule. — (Acts Continued.) (17 Nov 1964)

Mr Aubrey Jones: The hon. Member for Barons Court (Mr. Richard) will be the first to recognise that the maiden speech which he has just given was unconventionally vigorous and controversial. I should like to say that it was none the worse for that. While I envy him his boldness—I could never have done it myself—I congratulate him on his effort. I am sure that the whole Committee will look forward, if I...

Defence (26 Feb 1964)

Mr Aubrey Jones: Both the hon. Member for Leeds, East (Mr. Healey) and my right hon. Friend the Minister of Defence have covered a very wide canvas. They have dealt, in descending order of reality, with limited wars overseas, which I believe are likely to grow in seriousness rather than diminish, with large-scale conventional war in Europe, which I believe is a much more remote contingency, and, lastly, with...

Orders of the Day — Defence Transfer of Functions) Bill (21 Nov 1963)

Mr Aubrey Jones: In his opening speech my right hon. Friend said that there was a broad consensus of opinion to the effect that the arrangements in the Bill and accompanying the Bill were necessary and well contrived. I do not think that the debate has controverted that statement. The right hon. Member for Easington (Mr. Shinwell) expressed reservations, and doubts and criticisms have been put from both...

Science (15 Jul 1963)

Mr Aubrey Jones: The hon. Member for Coventry, East (Mr. Crossman) towards the end of his speech saw some correspondence between the speech I made in the science debate two years ago and the recent report published by the F.B.I. He went so far as to suggest that I might possibly have been the author of the F.B.I. report. Any influence that I have exercised on the F.B.I, report is extremely indirect. I gave...

Science (15 Jul 1963)

Mr Aubrey Jones: I never anticipate difficult decisions.

Foreign Affairs (2 Jul 1963)

Mr Aubrey Jones: In such a debate as this it is inevitable that the opening speakers should cover a wide range that a mere backbencher cannot hope to follow, but it is fair to say that from the two speeches we have heard two main subjects have emerged: first, the prospect of a détente with the Soviet Union, beginning with the test ban talks, and, secondly, and related to it, the difficult question of the...

Foreign Affairs (2 Jul 1963)

Mr Aubrey Jones: I think that this is the wrong occasion to go into the details of the scheme. I am confining myself to the essentials of the problem and I am trying to put to the House that the Americans put forward what is in many ways the heart of the question. Unacceptable though the details may be, they are trying to produce a trans-Atlantic unit.

Foreign Affairs (2 Jul 1963)

Mr Aubrey Jones: I am prepared to come to that if the hon. Member will allow me to get on. This has been described as a gimmick. If it were a. mere gimmick it would be right for this country to have nothing to do with it. I believe it to be more than a gimmick and that the forces which have given rise to this gimmickry—if gimmickry it be—will go on. In other words, I believe that the pressure to convert...

Foreign Affairs (2 Jul 1963)

Mr Aubrey Jones: I do not really dissent from that. My point is that de Gaulle differed from us in wanting to see Europe organised in terms of ultimate power apart from the United States. We took a different view, rightly, I think, and it was this difference which prompted the collapse of the talks. As I see it, the problem is to define the trans-Atlantic unit as a new centre of power, and in a way which,...

Orders of the Day — Nuclear Tests (19 Nov 1962)

Mr Aubrey Jones: There are two questions under discussion in this debate. First, the prospects for a ban on nuclear tests. Are the prospects better now than they were? Secondly, whether or not the Government's decision to undertake this test in Nevada jeopardises those prospects. I should like to address myself to the questions in that order. First, the prospect for the nuclear test ban talks. I do not think...

Orders of the Day — Nuclear Tests (19 Nov 1962)

Mr Aubrey Jones: Certainly it could constitute an excuse, but that is not jeopardising the prospects. That is not making the Russians determined to do something which otherwise they were not going to do. That seems to me the essential point. I thought that the case put forward by the right hon. Member for Belper was a little lopsided. He was saying that this test might jeopardise the prospects of a nuclear...

Orders of the Day — Nuclear Tests (19 Nov 1962)

Mr Aubrey Jones: We are talking about the prospects of nuclear test talks. I am not one to disregard the effects of neutral opinion, but what matters for these talks is what the great Powers think.

Orders of the Day — Nuclear Tests (19 Nov 1962)

Mr Aubrey Jones: Certainly. Indeed, I was about to say that. It was lopsided. I regret that both the right hon. Member for Belper and my right hon. Friend the Minister of Defence exaggerated our position. The position of my right hon. Friend is that the test has absolutely no effect on opinion in Moscow or Washington. On the other hand, he says that this test is one of military importance. He went on to add...

Orders of the Day — Nuclear Tests (19 Nov 1962)

Mr Aubrey Jones: I do not wish to interrupt the hon. Member, but he has misrepresented me. I did not say that this country could have no influence on world affairs. My contention is that there was a chance of this country having a proper influence on world affairs if it gauged its power realistically, but that if it gauged its power unrealistically its influence would be less than it otherwise would be.

Civil Estimates, 1962–63: European Economic Community (6 Jun 1962)

Mr Aubrey Jones: The basic position underlying the speech just made by the right hon. Gentleman the Leader of the Opposition is, I think, substantially the same as the position underlying the speech of my right hon. Friend the Lord Privy Seal. In other words, the right hon. Gentleman favours an application for entry into the European Community, subject to certain conditions being met. By conditions I think he...

Civil Estimates, 1962–63: European Economic Community (6 Jun 1962)

Mr Aubrey Jones: With respect, I think the hon. Gentleman is going too far. The constitutional position, as I understand it, is that an independent body takes the initiative in proposing action, but action does not follow unless the proposal secures a weighted majority. This is not the exercise of authority. It is a delicate balancing of relations. I do not deny, of course, that this kind of constitution...

Defence (5 Mar 1962)

Mr Aubrey Jones: The right hon. Member for Smethwick (Mr. Gordon Walker) has the advantage over some of us that he speaks on an unchanged subject with a fresh voice. Others of us run the risk of repeating ourselves, but I shall try to avoid that danger as best I can. I find myself in substantial agreement with his broad conclusions, but there are one or two in which I differ from him. I also differ from him...


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