Results 261–280 of 3294 for speaker:Mr William Bridgeman

Orders of the Day — Supply.: MR. Bridgeman's Statement. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: It is not intended to build them this year. I cannot pledge myself for the future, but it means that out of this programme, spread over so many years, we have cut one year's building out.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: MR. Bridgeman's Statement. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: They would have the same burden as I have now; that is, the burden of five cruisers which the Labour Government. laid down. When they come in, if ever they do, they will settle themselves what the necessities demand. I am not going to pledge myself that we shall not build any more cruisers, but as far as the programme of 1925 goes the effect is to cut out of the two years, 1927 and 1928, one...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: MR. Bridgeman's Statement. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: That is provided for under the Washington Conference and we cannot reopen that until the period has expired. I have no doubt the hon. Member would be very glad to have one on the Clyde. I have said a good deal about disarmament and the Conference at Geneva because of the words of the Amendment which is to he moved from the Opposition side. I want to show that although we do not go quite as...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: MR. Bridgeman's Statement. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: She was there before.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: MR. Bridgeman's Statement. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: She is kept by the New Zealand Government; and I said that they were going to maintain another cruiser in the same way as they are now maintaining the "Diomede."

Orders of the Day — Supply.: MR. Bridgeman's Statement. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: I did not admit it.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: MR. Bridgeman's Statement. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: I remember the hon. Gentleman saying that at the time, but I did not admit it then, and I do not admit it now.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: MR. Bridgeman's Statement. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: Long before the Americans raised the question of the 25 large cruisers, I had, in my first speech, actually proposed to limit the number of these large cruisers.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: That is not a quotation from my speech.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: Does the hon. Member want more?

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: The hon Member who moved the Amendment, and who has not been here since, would have heard several compliments paid to him had he remained. The hon. Member who seconded the Amendment is not in his place. The Debate began on a very mild, reasonable and unprovocative note, and it ended by the most gross exaggeration and absurd distortion that we have heard in any Debate of this kind, so far. The...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: It could be very quickly done, and nobody would be any the worse. The hon. Member then dealt with a theme which we have heard so often in this House. He referred to the bureaucrats. He said that the bureaucrats spoiled the Geneva Conference. It used to be said that it was the Admirals who spoiled the Conference, now it is the bureaucrats. The only alternative to that and the only change that...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: That it was not spoiled? Those were the three cardinal principles.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: Of course I did. Then why am I to blame for the Conference breaking down upon something to which I agreed? The hon. Member also ridiculed the idea that we asked for only 70 cruisers. On the other hand, the hon. Member for North Cornwall (Mr. A. M. Williams) said quite rightly that it was better to have some than none at all. The Mover of the Amendment also proceeded to discuss the great...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: I do not know; I was not at Washington. I believe that the British representative there accepted that, because it appeared then that there was a danger of losing the whole of the agreement on battleships if settlement was not arrived at on cruisers. Therefore the Conference accepted that, really without very much consideration. But I am not blaming him or the Americans or anyone else for not...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: I do not know the exact date, but certainly authority was given by other Governments to lay down these large cruisers before we began. Anyhow, hon. Gentlemen opposite cannot get out of the fact that they were the first people to do it.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: It may be quite right to blame the Government that preceded that of the right hon. Gentleman, but the fact remains that the Labour Government were responsible and accepted five-eighths of the programme of the previous Government. It is no use trying to avoid that fact. I do not want to make any undue capital out of it, but hon. Gentlemen opposite must abide by the decisions that they took,...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: Five minutes before the right hon. Gentleman had told us that the world was full of immoral Governments and panic-stricken people. Those are the words he used; I took them down. If that be true, surely there is something of which to be afraid: But let us for one moment consider this Amendment carefully. It says: International peace can only be assured by international agreements for a...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: If other people are going to do it, I am prepared, as I said at Geneva, to do it.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Disarmament. (15 Mar 1928)

Mr William Bridgeman: What I am pointing out is that the Amendment is practically what I proposed at Geneva, and hon. Members opposite are blaming me for its not having been accepted by someone else. Then we are to abolish submarines. I said at Geneva, and the British representative said it also at Washington, that we were perfectly ready to agree to the abolition of submarines if other nations would agree. There,...


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