Results 1–20 of 879 for speaker:Sir Robert Thomas

Oral Answers to Questions — Housing (Rural Workers) Act. (6 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: Is the right hon. Gentleman aware that the best county in this respect is the county which I represent?

Oral Answers to Questions — Housing (Rural Workers) Act. (6 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: Is the right hon. Gentleman also aware that the greatest urgency in this matter is to return a Liberal Government at the next Election?

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Board of Trade. (6 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: You can have propaganda in foreign countries as well.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Board of Trade. (6 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: I would like to congratulate the President of the Board of Trade upon what I would term a most businesslike speech, and upon his incorrigible optimism, which seems to have been augmented considerably since he has been joined by his very able Parliamentary Secretary, who happens to be a fellow-countryman of mine. Welshmen are famous for their optimism and hope- fulness. The right hon....

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Board of Trade. (6 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: My authority is the fact that on the Continent, when necessary longer hours will be worked and the wages will be lowered when necessity requires it. I do not ask any favour from the ship repairer, or the ship builder, but I do ask trade unionism to shape its policy in order to suit competition abroad. Surely that is not an unfair request.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Board of Trade. (6 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: I cannot say that I have read it word for word. I am afraid I could not stand an examination on it, but I have dipped into it. I am speaking now, however, as a man engaged in this trade. We are calling for peace in industry. Let us also have a little common sense in industry.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Board of Trade. (6 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: I entirely agree—on the part of the employers, and also on the part of the trade unionists. I ask it not for the sake of the employers but for the sake of all the workers engaged in the industry. I submit to trade unionists that they ought to study more closely conditions abroad in the interests of their own people at home. I should like to ask the right hon. Gentleman one further question....

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Board of Trade. (6 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: Yes, certainly, and every Service. For instance, many of our representatives abroad—our Consuls—are not British. I had that statement in reply to a question which I put in the House of Commons. Is it wise to have foreigners acting as British Consuls? Blood is thicker than water, and I think British commercial interests abroad should be represented by those who have a keen concern in the...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Board of Trade. (6 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: I understood the hon. Member to say that there had been no improvement in exports where Safeguarding had been applied, and I interjected that there had been such an improvement in the motor car industry. I understood the hon. Member to object to that statement, but we must admit it. Of course there has been an improvement in that case but my point is that that trade, and other particular...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Board of Trade. (6 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: Of course, Mr. Morris is a Conservative. I am prepared to give Safeguarding credit for the fact that it has not killed trade. What I do say is that it has done no good to trade. In fact, without it, trade would have increased still further. In conclusion, may I say that I am very delighted to have had this opportunity of intervening in this Debate, which will be my last in this House, on the...

Oral Answers to Questions — Ex-Service Men (Hospital Treatment). (2 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: 1. asked the Minister of Pensions the number of ex-service men who are still receiving hospital treatment for wounds or other disabilities arising out of War service, giving the separate figures for in-door and out-door patients; and what has been the decrease in numbers owing to deaths and on account of cures, respectively, since 1st January, 1928?

Oral Answers to Questions — Motor Traffic Noises (Prosecutions). (2 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: 3. asked the Home Secretary the number of motorists who have been prosecuted for causing undue noise since 1st January; and how many of these were motor-cyclists?

Oral Answers to Questions — Motor Traffic Noises (Prosecutions). (2 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: Has anything transpired out of the consultations which the right hon. Gentleman has had with his right hon. and gallant Friend the Minister of Transport about street noises?

Oral Answers to Questions — Motor Traffic Noises (Prosecutions). (2 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: Will the right hon. Gentleman be in a position to make a statement to the House on this important subject before he runs the risk of losing his office?

Oral Answers to Questions — Whist Drives and Lotteries. (2 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: If the right hon. Gentleman is returned to the next Parliament, will he then tackle the law on this question?

Oral Answers to Questions — Education.: Talking Films. (2 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: Will the Noble Lady consider whether the Board of Film Censors are worth consulting; would it not be better to change them completely, seeing that they have failed to stop these horrible films being exhibited?

Oral Answers to Questions — Unemployment.: Foreign Musicians. (2 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: 33. asked the Minister of Labour how many foreign orchestras and bands have been admitted into this country since 1st January, 1928, with the number of persons comprising them; and whether, in view of the unemployment existing among British musicians, he will consider means to discourage foreign orchestras from visiting this country professionally for long periods?

Oral Answers to Questions — Unemployment.: Foreign Musicians. (2 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: What does the hon. Gentleman mean by giving permission for a short period?

Oral Answers to Questions — Unemployment.: Foreign Musicians. (2 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: Is the hon. Gentleman not assuming in his answer that there are no British musicians out of employment, and is he aware that a large number of British musicians are out of work?

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries. (2 May 1929)

Sir Robert Thomas: Can the right hon. Gentleman give any figures as to the exports?


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