Results 1–20 of 1177 for speaker:Lord Robert Cecil

Oral Answers to Questions — Naval and Military Pensions and Grants.: League of Nations. (24 Jul 1923)

Lord Robert Cecil: The hon. and gallant Member will recognise that it does not rest with me to say when any special business shall be taken in this House. A report on the last meeting of the Council was laid on the Table of the House yesterday. The Secretary-General of the League is still responsible, as heretofore, for collecting information on conditions in the Saar territory for the use of the Council.

Oral Answers to Questions — Naval and Military Pensions and Grants.: League of Nations. (24 Jul 1923)

Lord Robert Cecil: There is nothing to prevent his going into the Saar Valley, and, in fact, an official of the League does go into the Saar Valley from time to time.

Oral Answers to Questions — Naval and Military Pensions and Grants.: League of Nations. (24 Jul 1923)

Lord Robert Cecil: It will certainly be circulated.

Civil Services and Revenue Departments Estimates, 1923–24.: Saar Valley and Ruhr District. (10 May 1923)

Lord Robert Cecil: The right hon. Gentleman has condemned the terms of this Decree. I shall not make any attempt whatever to defend what appears to me to be an outrage on the part of the Governing Commission of the Saar and a gross misuse of their powers. There is a little exaggeration in some of the right hon. Gentleman's observations. I mention that not because it invalidates the general line of his argument,...

Civil Services and Revenue Departments Estimates, 1923–24.: Saar Valley and Ruhr District. (10 May 1923)

Lord Robert Cecil: This Decree was, I understand, submitted to the League immediately. I understand they sent it to the Secretary-General immediately, two days afterwards and before it had come into force. I do not quarrel with that. I hope the Government will consider carefully whether they ought not to take advantage of any general settlement which may have to be arrived at about the general matter arising...

Civil Services and Revenue Departments Estimates, 1923–24.: Saar Valley and Ruhr District. (10 May 1923)

Lord Robert Cecil: I would answer that question if this were a public meeting in favour of the League of Nations, but I do not see that it has anything to do with this particular question as to the action in the Saar, which is totally apart from the question of military action. This question has an importance beyond its actual character, although its character is very bad. I agree with a great deal that has...

Civil Services and Revenue Departments Estimates, 1923–24.: Saar Valley and Ruhr District. (10 May 1923)

Lord Robert Cecil: When we are discussing those Notes, no doubt it will be proper for me to deal with them; but I am dealing with a different subject now. I particularly regret, not, perhaps, the adherence to that particular Note of Belgium, but generally the adherence of Belgium to the attitude which the French have taken up. I have noted that attitude with great surprise. The Belgian people owe a great deal...

Civil Services and Revenue Departments Estimates, 1923–24.: Saar Valley and Ruhr District. (10 May 1923)

Lord Robert Cecil: I did not suggest that there should be a special meeting for that purpose. What I suggested was that a meeting should be called for another purpose, which, I said, might also consider the Saar question.

Oral Answers to Questions — Education.: Eastern Galicia. (14 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: Can the hon. Gentleman indicate when the Allied Powers are likely to arrive at a decision in this matter, which has been under consideration, not only for many months, but for years?

Oral Answers to Questions — Peace Treaties.: League of Nations (Registration of Conventions). (14 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: Is there any real doubt as to the interpretation of Article 18? Has the Assembly not settled the meaning?

Reparations and Inter-Allied Debts.: Deut to United) States. (14 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: We have listened to a speech of an interesting character and of very varied temper. The end of it was an appeal, not perhaps altogether founded on tact, to America and to ourselves to arrive at a settlement of the Reparations question. I am one of those who profoundly agree that there is no greater interest for this country, for Europe or for the world than the settlement of that question. I...

Reparations and Inter-Allied Debts.: Deut to United) States. (14 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: There are two ways of doing things. [An HON. MEMBER: "A tricky way and a straight way!"] You may call it a straight way. There is also a provocative way; such a way as to create a violent sentiment in the French people that they are not being judged fairly and are being held up to obliquy and scorn on the part of a friendly nation. By that you are not doing anything to bring the nations of...

Reparations and Inter-Allied Debts.: Deut to United) States. (14 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: The Navy is not capable of being used for aggressive purposes in the way that the German army was capable of being used. The hon. Member for Dundee will forgive me if I say that I regret those passages in his speech, because there was a great deal in that speech with which I was quite in agreement—when he said he felt that the French seeking after security by military measures and military...

Reparations and Inter-Allied Debts.: Deut to United) States. (14 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: I think it was a very fair estimate of what we might expect to get two or three years ago, but I doubt whether you can get as much as that now. I do not want to be led away by that figure. What we have to consider is the difference as to the amount which can be paid by Germany, and that is the only point we have to consider. The controversy as to what the late Prime Minister did or did not...

Reparations and Inter-Allied Debts.: Deut to United) States. (14 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: That is not a question I wish to enter into at the present moment. My point is, why should we not ask the French to refer this matter to the League of Nations? Let us agree upon a tribunal to be appointed by the League of Nations to settle this question. And why not? If we can agree on that, if we can agree upon a fair method of ascertaining the amount Germany is able to pay, our difficulties...

Orders of the Day — Importation of Animals Bill: Clause 3. — Meaning of "imported animals" and provision-as to landing of animals from Ireland. (11 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: If we discuss the general position now, will we in any way restrict or preclude discussion on the particular Amendment which the right hon. Gentlemen have indicated, and which it is proposed to move when we reach Clause 9? May I suggest, that the proposed Amendment goes much further than the Amendment we are now on? It makes a much larger alteration in the Bill. Would it not be rather...

Orders of the Day — Trade Facilities and Loans Guarantee Bill. (6 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: The hon. Member who has just sat down says he is against Government interference with private business. No one agrees with him more heartily than I do on that, but I am not sure that his allegation w*as very well based on this particular Bill, because nobody is bound to take the advantages offered under this Bill unless they choose. Therefore, there is no need for any Government interference...

Orders of the Day — Irish Free State (Consequential Provisions) Bill.: Agriculture. (5 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: The hon. Member who has just sat down began by complaining, and perhaps his complaint was justified, that the right hon. Member for Carnarvon Boroughs (Mr. Lloyd George) had made an interesting speech, but had not furnished any suggestion as to what was to be the conclusion of the arrangement. That was true. It was a tantalising speech. It seemed as if he was going to tell us something, but...

Orders of the Day — Irish Free State (Consequential Provisions) Bill.: Agriculture. (5 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: There is no good in talking that way in the House of Commons. You have got to define what you propose. I have listened to many speeches from the Labour Benches, and I have heard nothing but mere meaningless objurgations. Supposing you take the land for nothing, you are not going to give it to the farmers. You are going to make them pay rent.

Orders of the Day — Irish Free State (Consequential Provisions) Bill.: Agriculture. (5 Dec 1922)

Lord Robert Cecil: Observations of the kind made by the hon. Member for Stirling (Mr. Johnston) do not do the party opposite the slightest good. Hon. Members opposite know very well that—


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