Results 1–20 of 1776 for speaker:Mr Herbert Samuel

International Situation. (24 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: From the Abyssinians?

Unemployment. (24 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: The hon. Baronet has omitted my introductory words. I was not referring to the situation at this moment. I said: How long that resistance will endure we cannot tell, but we must contemplate the fact that the war is going on, that thousands and thousands of Abyssinians are being killed and that more and more of the territory of Abyssinia is actually being occupied by Italian armies, and that...

Unemployment. (24 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: I gather that in the circumstances that I envisage the hon. and gallant Gentleman would do nothing?

Unemployment. (24 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: Again, the hon. and gallant Member has left out the salient passage of the part of my speech which he is criticising. It is the second time he has done that, and I am afraid that it is becoming a habit with him. Had he quoted the parts which are definitely relevant it would have precluded him from making the observations which he has just made. I will only read a sentence or two: I do not...

Unemployment. (24 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: It was in order to base an economic argument upon it.

Prorogation and Dissolution of Parliament. (23 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: What in practice is the actual commitment?

Prorogation and Dissolution of Parliament. (23 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: What we want to understand is what form does the application of that Article to this country take in present circumstances?

Oral Answers to Questions — Italy and Abyssinia. (22 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: (by Private Notice) asked the Prime Minister what powers are vested in the Executive to stop importations into this country from Italy, or to apply other sanctions in accordance with the resolutions adopted by the League of Nations?

Business of the House. (22 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: Does the Prime Minister realise that if matters are left as they are the Debate to-day will be thrown into confusion? Is the Debate to be limited to foreign affairs, or will it range over matters of domestic interest? Will the Opposition be expected to confine their speeches to foreign affairs, or will they be justified in dealing with such matters as unemployment and other questions of much...

Business of the House. (22 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: The Prime Minister proposes to speak to-morrow on the Dissolution and the reasons for it. Will not other hon. Members who may speak to-day be entitled to speak to-morrow on the same subject?

Admiral Sir Colin Keppel (Retirement). (22 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: Those who sit in this part of the House desire to associate themselves with what has been said by the Leader of the House and by the Leader of the Opposition. Sir Colin Keppel was marked by great dignity and courtesy and he was the most popular official of the House. We must all have viewed with sympathy, as the Leader of the Opposition has said, his fate in being required to listen to our...

International Situation. (22 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: As was suggested during the brief Question Time to-day, some of us think that it is embarrassing for the House not to know whether this Debate is to be the only Debate to take place before the Dissolution. It is the tradition of the House of Commons that when questions of foreign policy are before it, every step is taken to secure some unanimity of tone and of effort and that highly...

International Situation. (22 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: I am glad to have elicited that explanation, which is completely satisfactory. But we have to contemplate the possibility, and it is a possibility, that economic sanctions will not be effective. Any country which is at war is able in a most remarkable fashion to continue the war in disregard of all sorts of extreme economic difficulties and even without any visible financial resources, and it...

International Situation. (22 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: Take the same lead at Geneva for enforcing further sanctions as the right hon. Gentleman has for enforcing economic sanctions. Let the League decide whether it would prefer to see the whole of this great effort to maintain the peace of the world collapse ignominiously or prefer to put the situation clearly before the Italians, who have far more to lose than anyone else. They have 200,000 men...

International Situation. (22 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: No one wishes to use force of arms; everyone hopes that other methods will be effective. I was putting the other consideration, that if it became clear to the whole world that they are wholly ineffective and a failure, what then? I was endeavouring to say what action we should take, and I regret that by the interruption I have been led into a disquisition on these matters which I certainly...

International Situation. (22 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: The right hon. and gallant Member says it is a good thing they are excluded, I presume because they are militaristic countries?

International Situation. (22 Oct 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: The right hon. Gentleman means well, but he is very often irrelevant. I take it his argument is that because these countries are militarist the rest of the world should do nothing to increase their economic prosperity. In effect, he says that unless they guarantee us peace we shall not help them to prosperity; and they reply, "Unless you help us to be prosperous we shall not guarantee peace."...

Oral Answers to Questions — Transport.: Trunk Roads Improvements (Grants). (1 Aug 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: Can the right hon. Gentleman say whether the cost of these improvements comes out of the growing produce of the Road Fund?

Orders of the Day — International Situation. (1 Aug 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: It is usual at this period of the year, when the House of Commons is about to adjourn for a long recess, for a survey to be taken of the international situation, and we are grateful to the Opposition for having inaugurated this discussion today. The right hon. Member for Bow and Bromley (Mr. Lansbury) has dealt with a broad range of topics. He began by asking the Government what was their...

Orders of the Day — Consolidated Fund (Appropriation) Bill.: Agriculture. (31 Jul 1935)

Mr Herbert Samuel: I said it in my last speech on this subject.


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