Results 161–180 of 228 for speaker:Hon. Harold Nicolson

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Information.: Empire News (Censorship). (11 Jun 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Certain passages from a speech by Mr. Jack Tanner were inserted in the General News Service issue of the 30th May. They appeared to have been inserted in their context by the editor of the service for the sole purpose of casting disrepute upon the war effort of this country, and were cut accordingly. The answer to the second part of the Question is in the negative.

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Information.: Empire News (Censorship). (11 Jun 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: The censorship of matter transmitted by mail abroad is exercised by virtue of warrants granted by the Crown which authorise the censorship of postal material. The principles on which censorship is exercised in such matters are settled by administrative decision, which, in the case of Press matter, is taken by my right hon. Friend.

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army.: Local Defence Volunteers. (4 Jun 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: The preparation of both the types of film suggested was considered several weeks ago, but, after careful examination, it was decided that the necessary instructions would be better conveyed by other means.

Oral Answers to Questions — British Army.: Local Defence Volunteers. (4 Jun 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: It is at present contemplated to do it by means of pamphlets which will be circulated to every household, and they will provide full instructions.

Oral Answers to Questions — Military Service.: Propaganda Films. (30 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: The answer to the first part of the Question is in the affirmative. Before the recent intensification of hostilities, the Ministry of Information had commissioned 60 films of various kinds and were helping a number of film production companies by the grant of facilities and official approval. Some of the films commissioned were inappropriate to the present crisis and have been temporarily...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: It is an outside organisation.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Yes, Sir, under the supervision of the head of the Mission.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: No, it is through the Foreign Office to the head of the Mission. Reports come to us, and there is a sort of dual liaison.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I am sure my right hon. Friend would agree with the hon. Member for Romford (Mr. Parker) that this Debate has served a useful purpose. We are very grateful to hon. Members not only for the brevity of their speeches, which has enabled the Committee to get through such variety of discussion in so short a time, but for the many suggestions on many topics that have been made to us, and the...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: They are increasing all the time. I cannot give the exact number now, but I will let the hon. Member know. Not only in times of danger should there be somebody to guide local opinion, but in the event of any dislocation of information taking place, such as a momentary stoppage of the wireless, there should be recognised people in every street, if possible, whose information is taken as...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: They get it from the regional office. All regional offices have their central office where the news is received and they have branch offices where it is disseminated. My hon. Friend the Member for Norwich (Mr. H. Strauss) launched an attack—I do not think a deserved attack—upon the British Broadcasting Corporation and especially upon their choice of Mr. Middleton Murry, I would not have...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: In any case I do not admit the principle that you must refuse to use the services of a person because that person has in the past been completely opposed to war.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: He gave six talks and I cannot pretend to have listened to more than one or two of them but he is an extremely cultured critic with a very sensitive mind and great knowledge and is very competent to deal with any literary or critical subject. A great deal has been said in this Debate about the proportions between entertainment and talks in the B.B.C. programme, and the Minister's...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: It is a great question whether Germans should be used for this purpose or not. As the hon. Gentleman knows, there has always been great controversy about whether it causes more annoyance than pleasure in these cases to hear Germans speaking on the wireless. My personal opinion is that you should always use a purely sectional German representing a definite class or interest and that it is a...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: There certainly is a distinction. The hon. Lady the Member for the English Universities (Miss Rathbone) was the first to touch upon the question of what I may call Anglo-French propaganda, and she drew a rather gloomy picture of the doubts that were being expressed in France about our war effort. I went to France about two months ago and lectured in about 12 different places. The people whom...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Yes, that is what we are doing at this moment. It is all very difficult, but what we have been trying to arrangements been, not to hear from French people over here about France's war effort or to send English people to France to talk to the French people about this country's war effort, but to get English speakers to tell our country about the French war effort and French speakers to tell...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Well, what am I to do? Would it be more effective if I tried to talk as the Minister of Labour does, than if the Minister of Labour tried to talk as I do? It is a question of how one talks. If it is intensely irritating for the hon. Member for Burslem to listen to me, he has only to do one little thing—that is, to turn off. I am certainly not going to adopt a sham attitude on the wireless...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Yes, Sir. That is realised. The second question that the hon. Member for East Wolverhampton asked was about a panel of speakers. We are getting a great many non-political, or non-House of Commons people, such as Professor Jones and that type.

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Perhaps the hon. Member will let me know what he has in mind. He spoke a great deal of propaganda in the Balkans, and I can tell him that this is also being organised. The suggestion is being made, and, in fact, is urgently being considered, to send out a sort of supervisor, a man of experience and position, to supervise the whole question of public relations with the Balkans. He will have a...

Orders of the Day — Supply.: Civil Estimates, 1940. (28 May 1940)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Then the discourtesy, such as it was, was indirect.


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