Results 81–100 of 228 for speaker:Hon. Harold Nicolson

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Information. (27 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: No, abroad. In any case it is perfectly possible to say, if one can define what a publicity expert is—and that would be a very difficult definition—that the officials in charge of the main departments of the Ministry are not necessarily expert in the purely publicity side of propaganda. It might also be mentioned, however, that each one has attained, at an early age, a leading position in...

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Information. (27 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: We have a great deal to answer for, and we are very proud of it. In spite of the fact that the Germans possessed armoured divisions on the various frontiers of the countries they threatened and intimidated, so excellent was the presentation of our case, so great a conviction did we win of our eventual victory and the righteousness of our cause, that Greece and Yugoslavia came on to our side....

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Information. (27 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: A further point upon which the hon. and gallant Member rightly laid stress was the question of America. He has been in America more recently than I have, and his visits to that country, although not as frequent as my own, have been more extensive. Whereas I did not go beyond California, such was his interest in American social reform and in grasping the meaning of the American idea, that he...

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Information. (27 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I think it was something to do with child welfare.

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Information. (27 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I was reminding the House that the hon. and gallant Gentleman has a more recent and wider experience of American conditions than I have. I agree with a good deal of what the hon. and gallant Member said. It is true, and I think that anyone of any experience of the United State will agree, that in the early stages of the war it was absolutely essential that His Majesty's Government should...

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Information. (27 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I was just coming to that. We are also hoping before long to provide American newspaper men in London, to whom, incidentally, we owe a very great debt, not only with greater facilities for getting information, not only with greater background stuff, but also, I hope, with the assistance of Mr. Speaker and the willing co-operation of the Press Gallery, with greater facilities in this House,...

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Information. (27 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: If it is a Government official statement it is immediately referred to the Department concerned. If it is a matter dealing with Admiralty affairs, it is "O.K'd" by the Admiralty; if a statement on' home security, by the Department of Home Security. It is the Department actually concerned which passes any official communiqué But where we come in, as we do after the event, is to indicate...

Orders of the Day — Ministry of Information. (27 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: That is an important question. My right hon. Friend has had reason to speak about the paucity and thinness of the Parliamentary reports and about the enormous and disproportionate length given to Government statements compared with statements by ordinary private Members. He has taken that very much to heart. I hope that, after the Recess, there will be a regular weekly Parliamentary report...

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Information (Broadcasts to Switzerland). (22 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: These broadcasts were started as an experiment, and it was represented to us both officially by the Swiss Government and otherwise that the reaction to them in Switzerland was unfavourable. In these circumstances, and for the reasons stated by my right hon. Friend in his reply of the 14th May to the hon. Baronet the Member for the City of London (Sir G. Broadbridge), the broadcasts were...

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Information (Broadcasts to Switzerland). (22 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: That is not the fact. It was not due to Nazi terrorism. The information we got from all sources was that these broadcasts were not really welcome to the Swiss people, who did not wish to start a broadcast war over their area.

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Information.: Broadcast Postscripts. (21 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: My hon. and gallant Friend will have observed that during recent weeks all subjects likely to provoke political controversy have been avoided in Sunday evening postscripts.

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Information.: News (Release). (21 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: News put out by the enemy is in many cases not "confirmed" news but news which the enemy are only too anxious for us either to confirm or to deny. Apart from this, my right hon. Friend knows of no reasons, other than security reasons, which prevent the immediate release of news.

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Information.: News (Release). (21 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: That is a point to which my right hon. Friend is giving very constant attention.

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Information.: House of Commons and Westminster Abbey (Bombing). (21 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: The damage inflicted on Westminster Abbey and the House of Commons was the subject of a special communiqué on the day after the event, and the incident has already received the fullest publicity. While my right hon. Friend does not think that the world stands in need of any further evidence of deliberate vandalism on the part of Germany, he is grateful for this opportunity of calling...

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Information.: Queen's University, Belfast (Examination Scripts, Censorship). (21 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: My right hon. Friend regrets that it is not legally possible for him to issue the instructions proposed by the hon. Member. If, however, the appropriate authority in Queen's University, Belfast, will communicate with the Chief Postal Censor, steps will be taken to facilitate the grant of the necessary permits.

Oral Answers to Questions — Damaged Historical Buildings, London (Information). (20 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Reference to any individual site recently injured by air bombardment is forbidden on security grounds. It is the practice to relax this rule in the case of some buildings of historic or national importance within a short time of the event.

Oral Answers to Questions — Damaged Historical Buildings, London (Information). (20 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Certainly, Sir.

Oral Answers to Questions — Damaged Historical Buildings, London (Information). (20 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: It is not a question of policy; it is a question of common sense. We wish to give just as much information as we possibly can without giving information to the enemy.

Oral Answers to Questions — Ministry of Information.: Battle of the Atlantic (Losses). (8 May 1941)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: My right hon. Friend is well aware of the considerations to which the hon. Member refers, and he is anxious to release as much information as possible on this and other aspects of the Battle of the Atlantic. It must however be borne in mind that information which is of interest to our friends in America may be of assistance to our enemies in Europe.


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