Results 21–40 of 228 for speaker:Hon. Harold Nicolson

Orders of the Day — Foreign Affairs (24 May 1944)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: The Committee will, I feel sure, be united in congratulating the Prime Minister upon the speech that he has just made. Vast as was the canvas which he had chosen he has managed to display a power of composition which only a practised painter can achieve. By his examination of several obscure problems he was able to illuminate many dark corners and to dispel many misty doubts. I think the...

War Situation and Foreign Affairs (15 Dec 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I wish I could follow the hon. Member for North Lambeth (Mr. G. Strauss) the whole length of his speech, but I cannot do that. I wish I could really feel that by abolishing big business and the 200 families of France we should secure peace and prosperity in Europe. I do not feel that the future of Europe can be solved solely on sociological grounds, and though I most warmly endorse some of...

War Situation and Foreign Affairs (15 Dec 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: They had no right to do it. They only did it under pressure. We insisted that they should do it. It was the right thing to do, but we should have realised that our, position is not a very logical one; and we should at least have adopted this time the admirable procedure that we followed when the original promise was made. When the Catroux pronouncement was made we were not there. It was made...

Greece and Belgium (Food and Medical Supplies) (10 Nov 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I am glad to have an opportunity to take part in this Debate, since it deals with a subject of very serious importance—one in fact which involves a grave question of national responsibility—and since I think it is right that such matters should be discussed in every part of the House by people who in other ways may not always take the same point of view. I am not a sentimentalist. I do...

Greece and Belgium (Food and Medical Supplies) (10 Nov 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Does the hon. Gentleman know what children of school age receive?

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service Bill (22 Jun 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I should not have intervened in this Debate had I not been stung to intervention by the remarks not only of the hon. Member for Keighley (Mr. Ivor Thomas) but of my hon. and gallant Friend the Member for Falmouth (Major Petherick) in connection with Clause 2. The hon. Member for Keighley considered it unfortunate that inefficient officers should be retired at a certain age and feared that the...

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service Bill (22 Jun 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I am glad that my hon. and gallant Friend has modified what struck me as an extreme statement into a statement which is not so extreme. But the fact remains that it is not a good system in the Civil Service to ask one Department to receive the discards of another. There is one point on which I should like my right hon. Friend to give us some assurance. He is quite rightly, and with great...

Oral Answers to Questions — Multilateral Disarmament (2 Jun 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Is it not clear that the best way to prevent war is the retention of strong forces by those nations that have a vested interest in peace?

British Broadcasting Corporation (Propaganda) (8 Apr 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: In war-time.

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I am sure that the House has listened with interest and considerable sympathy to the very general review of the problem of the entry of women into the Diplomatic Service which the noble Lady has just made. I agree that there are many occasions when it would be very much in the public interest to appoint some well-known woman—known for her probity, intelligence, ability and balance—to some...

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: It will take many generations before that is altered.

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: There are posts and there always will be posts, at least for three generations, at least for go years, to which women could not be appointed and for which they would not be qualified. To put them on a footing of absolute equality would be to put them in a position not only of equality but actually of privilege. The places where they would function most usefully would be the more agreeable,...

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Women missionaries are sent out with the intention of living abroad in certain countries, whereas women in the Foreign Service would be sent with the intention of being moved from one place to another. The Noble Lady said, and it is a contention of many people, that women have never been given a chance hitherto. I think it may be correct that they have never been given a chance; but from the...

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I think not for the reasons which the Noble Lady adduces, but for a much more serious and important reason, namely, that the special virtues of women—and the Noble Lady did indicate that women possessed certain virtues and talents to a degree greater than men—are singularly ill-adapted to diplomatic life. These virtues, I should say, were, first, intuition and, secondly, sympathy....

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I did not mean my observation to imply softness or hardness; but to indicate the tendency of women to identify themselves with parties, personalities and controversies in the countries to which they would be accredited. I pass from that question. After all, in the White Paper the question of women is reserved for future consideration in terms which repudiate all ancient prejudice. There is...

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: That was the impression I got.

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I should very much regret it if it went out abroad that the general opinion of this House was one of anything but appreciation of the extraordinary ability shown by the officials of our Diplomatic Service during the present war. I do not wish to particularise—that might be invidious—but the work, for instance, done by Sir Archibald Clark Kerr in Chungking and the relations he managed to...

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: Does my hon. Friend really think the Minister of Agriculture owes his position and influence to the old school tie?

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: I would refer to the admirable work done by the Service as it now stands. I trust that the reforms indicated in this Report will not destroy the traditions and continuity of the Service as it existed before. I would be the very first to admit that in this modern age it would be quite impossible to work our foreign policy with the more specialised machine such as we had up to the outbreak of...

Orders of the Day — Foreign Service (Reform) (18 Mar 1943)

Hon. Harold Nicolson: No. I beg them not to carry out the rule regarding retirement at 60. One of the most incredible things which have happened has been the way in which we have got rid of some of our ambassadors at the very moment when the whole weight of their experience was most essential for the public good. Diplomatists are like wine, they improve with age. To get rid of a man like Sir Horace Rumboldt at the...


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